The Master of Fear — or, God’s Fragrance


In the archaic period of ancient Egypt, bodies were not mummified. The body was torn to pieces, the flesh was cut into small parts, the skeleton was dislocated. Once the skeleton was dismembered, the fragments were then gathered together to reconstitute it again, and given the position of an embryo – as evidenced by the bodies found in necropolises.

An inscription from Pepi the 1st, who ruled from 2289 to 2255 B.C., says: « Mout gives you your head, it gives you the gift of your bones, it assembles your flesh, it brings your heart into your belly. (…) Horus’ eye has set the bones of God in order and gathered his flesh. We offer God his head, his bones, we establish his head on his bones in front of Seb. »

It is a description of the reconstruction of the body of the God Osiris, dismembered by his murderer, Set. It is the son of Osiris, Horus, the Hawk God, who realizes it. Meanwhile, Osiris’ soul is taking refuge in Horus’ eye.

The Abydos ritual, in its 12th section, gives even more details. « Horus came full of his humors to kiss his father Osiris; he found him in his place, in the land of gazelles, and Osiris filled himself with the eye he had given birth to. Ammon-Ra, I have come to you; be stable; fill yourself with blush from the eye of Horus, fill yourself with it: he brings together your bones, he gathers your limbs, he assembles your flesh, he lets go all your bad humors on the ground. You have taken his perfume, and sweet his perfume for you, as Ra when he comes out of the horizon (…) Ammon-Ra, the perfume of Horus’ eye is for you, so the companion gods of Osiris are gracious to you. You have taken the crown, you are given the appearance of Osiris, you are brighter there than the bright ones, according to the order of Horus himself, the Lord of generations – Oh! this oil of Horus, Oh! this oil of Set! Horus offered his eye which he took from his ennemies, Set did not hide in him, Horus filled himself with it, and given his divine appearance. Horus’ eye unites his perfume to you. »

Thoth goes in search of Horus’ eye. He finds it, and brings it back to him. Horus, given back in possession of his eye, can present it to his father Osiris, and give him back his soul, which had been hidden in the eye all that time. Then Horus embraces the God Osiris and anoints him as king of Heaven.

What does all that mean?

At the death of the God Osiris, as at the death of every other god and every man, the soul flees and takes residence in the solar eye, the eye of Horus. After the ceremonies and mummification, comes the time to give the soul back to the body. To do this, one must find the soul that is in the vanished eye and return it to Horus.

Most of the time Thoth is in charge of this task. It is at the moment when Horus and Thoth embrace God, that his soul is returned to him.

None of this is mechanical, automatic. Let us not forget that the dismembered bodies are generally in the process of advanced decomposition. We are at the limits of what is bearable. It is in this stench, however, that the divine is revealed. « The God comes, with his limbs that he had hidden in the eye of his body. The resins of God come out of him to perfume the humors coming out of his divine flesh, the secretions that have fallen to the ground. All the gods have given him this, that you surrender yourself among them as a master of fear. »

The smell of this body, which is no longer rotting because it has been mummified, attests to the divinity of the process, of the miracle that takes place, through the respect of rites.

We must return to the most down-to-earth phenomena of the death process. Here is a corpse; it exhales liquids, and oozes juices, « resins ». The Egyptian genius sees a divine presence at work here.

« The fragrance of the resin and the resin itself are gods who, confused with the divinity, also resided in the eye of Horus. »

In the Arabic language, the word « eye » is the same as the word « source ». In desert culture, the vitreous humor contained in the eyeball is assimilated to pure water, a water that allows you to see. The water in the eye is the source of vision.

What matters to the ancient Egyptians goes far beyond water, the eye and vision. The « resin » exhaled by the dead, its perfume, the smoothness of this « juice », this humor, and its smell, are themselves « gods ». We deduce that it is the very action of divine transcendence that is approached by these metaphors.

The breath, the smell, the odour of the secretion, the perfume have nothing visible. They belong to the invisible, the intangible. The eye does not see the breath, it does not see the invisible, it doesn’t see what’s hidden, let alone what it’s itself hiding.

« Horus’ eye hid you in his tears. »

This image transcends eras, ages, civilizations, religions.

« Horus’ eye hid you in his tears, and his incense comes to you, Ammon-Ra, Lord of Karnak, it rises to you among the Gods. Divine fragrance, twice good, rise up like a God. »

The most sublime vision is only a brief foretaste. It is not the end of the journey. Rather a beginning. The taste of tears still hides the God. Much further away, beyond the visible, beyond the bitter or sweet flavor, the perfume of God rises in silence.

And the fragrance of the soul is also ‘like a God’, — rising to announce the coming of the hidden, supreme, God, — Ammon.

A Jewish Osiris


The God Osiris was murdered by his brother Seth, who then cut him into pieces, which he distributed throughout Egypt. The papyrus Jumilhac says that the head was in Abydos, the jaws in Upper Egypt, the intestines in Pithom, the lungs in Behemet Delta, the phallus in Mendes, both legs in Iakémet, the fingers in the 13th and 14th nomes, an arm in the 20th nome and the heart in Athribis Delta.

Plutarch, who later told the story of Osiris, gave a different distribution. The important thing is that Osiris, a God who died and rose again, embodies the heart of the ancient Egyptians’ belief in the resurrection of the dead and in eternal life.

The idea of a dead and risen God is a paradigm, whose analogy with the figure of Jesus Christ, crucified and risen, cannot be overlooked.

Several precious papyrus tell the story of the God Osiris, his many adventures. Murders, tricks, betrayals, magical transformations abound. To read them today, in an era both disenchanted and eager for misguided religious passions, can be conceived as a dive back several millennia, a dive into the dawn of an emerging, deeply religious feeling, in all the meanings of this ambiguous term.

The papyrus Jumilhac, kept in Paris, tells the story of the revenge of Osiris’ son, Anubis, who went after Seth, his father’s killer. Knowing that he was threatened, Seth took the form of Anubis himself, to try to cover his tracks, before taking many other forms.

« Then Imakhumankh walked at the head of the gods who watch over Osiris; he found Demib and cut off his head, so that he was anointed with his [blood]. [Seth] came looking for him, after he had turned into an Anubis (…) Then Isis dismembered Seth with her own teeth, biting him in his back, and Thoth pronounced his spells against him. Re then said: ‘Let this seat be attributed to the « Tired »; look as he regenerated himself! How beautiful it is! And that let Seth be placed under him as a seat. That’s right, because of the harm he did to all the members of Osiris.’ (…)

But Seth fled into the wilderness and made his transformation into the panther of this nome. Anubis, however, seized him, and Thoth said his magic spells against him again. So he fell to the ground in front of him. Anubis bound him by his arms and legs and Seth was consumed in the flame, from head to toe, throughout his body, east of the august room. The smell of his fat having reached the heaven, it spread in this magnificent place, and Re and the gods held it for pleasant. Then Anubis split Seth’s skin, and tore it off, and put his fur on him. (…)

And Seth made his transformation into Anubis, so that the gate-keepers should not be able to recognize him (…) Anubis pursued him with the gods of his retinue, and joined him. But Set, taking on the appearance of a bull, made his form unrecognizable. But Anubis bound him by his arms and legs, and cut off his phallus and testicles. (…)

After that Anubis entered the Ouâbet to check the condition of his father, Osiris, and he found him safe and sound, with firm and fresh flesh. He turned into a falcon, opened his wings behind his father Osiris, and behind the vase that contained the aqueous humors of this God (…) he spread the wings as a falcon to fly, in search of his own eye, and brought it back intact to his master. »

As we see, Seth is constantly transforming himself into anubis, then into a panther, finally into a bull. But Anubis always follows him, with Thot’s help. Then Seth is transformed into Osiris’ « seat » or Anubis’ « fur ». But it is the final transformation that is most pleasing to the supreme God, Re. Seth is consumed in flames and in the smell of fat, and he spreads himself into the magnificent Heaven.

It is interesting to compare the final transformation of Seth into flames and odours with that of Anubis, who takes the form of the falcon. This falcon, Horus, is one of the oldest, most archaic deities in the Egyptian pantheon. In the Osirian context, Horus represents the posthumous son of Osiris and Isis, who flies over his dead father in search of his eye and helps to restore his life.

The papyrus Jumilhac evokes the legend of Horus in chapter XXI, and compares it to a vine.

« As for the vineyard, it is the frame that surrounds the two eyes to protect them; as for the grape, it is the pupil of Horus’ eye; as for the wine that is made, it is Horus’ tears. »i

Wine stands for the tears of the son of the God Osiris, himself likened to a « vine ». How can we not think of this other ‘wine’, the blood of Christ, the sacrificed son of the living God?

iPapyrus Jumilhac. XIV,14,15, Paris. Copy consulted in Bibliothèque Ste Geneviève. Paris. Translation Jacques Vandier.

The Land of Death and Resurrection


In ancient Egypt, Death was the key moment, – the moment when took place the transformation of the soul of the dead into the “Ba”, the divine principle of Re.

Neferubenef’s Papyrus identifies the « Ba » with the « divine ram of Mendes, the city where the mystical union of the two souls of Re and Osiris is made, »i according to Si Ratié, who translated it.

The religion of ancient Egypt used to bring hope to everyone. The hope for eternal salvation. Every human soul was given the possibility of carrying out an ultimate, divine and royal ‘mutation’ at the moment of death, – under certain conditions. The soul had the power to transform herself into a « Horus of gold », whose flesh is of gold, and the bones of silver, to speak metaphorically.

The origin of this belief goes back to the dawn of time. Archaeological evidence of a funeral cult in Upper Egypt dating back to before the first dynasty, around 3500 BC, has been found.

Today, Neferoubenef’s Papyrus makes us hear the voice of the faithful as they prepared for this decisive test.

« Hail to you who is in the holy necropolis of Rosetau; I know you, I know your name. Deliver me from these snakes that are in Rosetau, that live from the flesh of humans, that swallow their blood, for I know them, I know their names. May the first order of Osiris, Lord of the Universe, mysterious in what he does, be to give me the breath in this fear that is in the midst of the West; may he never cease to order the directives according to what has existed, he who is mysterious within the darkness. May glory be given to him in Rosetau! Master of the darkness, who descends and orders food in the West! We hear his voice, we don’t see him, the great God who is in Busiris! (…)

I come as a messenger from the Lord of the Universe. Horus, his throne has been given to him. His father gives him all the praise, as well as those in the boat. Lord of fear in Nut and in the Douat! I am Horus. I have come to be in charge of the sentence. Let me come in, let me say what I saw. »ii

These ancient words strike us by their mysterious echoes, later reverberating in other, subsequent, religions, such as Judaism or Christianity.

Several millennia before Abraham left Ur and gave tribute to Melchisedech, some high priests in Egypt used to sing psalms such as :

« We hear His voice, we don’t see him, the great God. »

« I come as a messenger from the Lord of the Universe. Horus, His throne has been given to Him. His father gives Him all the praise, as well as those in the boat. »

And there is this even stranger, prophetic, formula:

« The fear that is in the middle of the West ».

The West has always been for the Semites, as evidenced today by the Arabic language, which calls it « Maghreb », literally the “place of exile”, a “place of danger”.

For the ancient Egyptians, the West was indeed the place associated with “death”. But it was also the place of “resurrection”.

The deep, collective, memory, embodied in minds and in the unconscious for thousands of years, has undoubtedly cultivated this fear. Maybe it still exists in a latent form. That could explain a hidden connection between the ancient myth of the Golden Horus, the revelation of the great God who is in Busiris, and the fear many people of the ‘Esat’ resent about the ‘West’ today?

« The fear that is in the middle of the West » is several thousand years old.

It is a strange paradox, completely devoid of any “modern” rationality, but still worth considering, with all its overtones: for the oldest religion ever appeared in the “East”, the “West” is the « Land of Death », but also as the unique place for “Resurrection”.

If there are still ears to hear, there is an interesting lesson to be learned here.

i Si Ratié, Le Papyrus de Naferoubenef, 1968

iiIbid.

L’avenir prometteur de l’esprit « barbare »


 

L’idée d’une religion « universelle » est tôt apparue dans l’histoire, en dépit de tous les obstacles dressés par les traditions, les prêtres et les princes.

Les religions tribales ou nationales, les sectes exclusives, réservées à des initiés, n’avaient aucun penchant pour un divin sans frontière. Mais, le divin étant une fois posé dans la conscience des hommes, comment lui assigner quelque limite que ce soit?

Le prophète persan Mani affirmait, cinq siècles avant le prophète Muhammad, qu’il était le « sceau des prophètes ». Deux siècles après Jésus, il voulut le dépasser en « universalité », par un syncrétisme de gréco-bouddhisme et de zoroastrisme. Le manichéisme eut son heure de gloire, et se répandit jusqu’en Chine. Augustin, qui l’embrassa un temps, témoigne de son expansion géographique, et de son emprise sur les esprits. Aujourd’hui encore, le manichéisme, axé sur le grand combat du Bien et du Mal, a sans doute une influence certaine, quoique sous d’autres appellations.

Les premiers Chrétiens ne se percevaient plus comme Juifs ou Gentils. Ils se voyaient comme une « troisième sorte » d’hommes (« triton genos », « tertium genus »), des « trans-humains » en quelque sorte, dirait-on aujourd’hui. Ils promouvaient une nouvelle « sagesse barbare », tant du point de vue des Juifs que de celui des Grecs, une « sagesse » au-delà de la Loi juive et de la philosophie grecque. On ne peut nier qu’ils apportaient un souffle nouveau. Pour la première fois dans l’histoire du monde, les Chrétiens n’étaient pas un peuple parmi les peuples, une nation parmi les nations, mais « une nation issue des nations », ainsi que le formula Aphrahat, au 4ème siècle.

Les Juifs se séparaient des Goyim. Les Grecs s’opposaient aux Barbares. Les Chrétiens sortaient du champ. Ils se voulaient une « nation » non terrestre mais spirituelle, comme une « âme » dans le corps du monde.

A la même époque, des mouvements religieux contraires, et même antagonistes au dernier degré, voyaient le jour. Les Esséniens, par exemple, allaient dans un sens opposé à cette aspiration à l’universalisme religieux. Un texte trouvé à Qumran, près de la mer Morte, prône la haine contre tous ceux qui ne sont pas membres de la secte essénienne, insistant d’ailleurs sur l’importance de garder secrète cette « haine ». Le membre de la secte essénienne « doit cacher l’enseignement de la Loi aux hommes de fausseté (anshei ha-’arel), mais il doit annoncer la vraie connaissance et le jugement droit à ceux qui ont choisi la voie. (…) Haine éternelle dans un esprit de secret pour les hommes de perdition ! (sin’at ‘olam ‘im anshei shahat be-ruah hasher) »i .

G. Stroumsa commente : « La conduite pacifique des Esséniens vis-à-vis du monde environnant apparaît maintenant n’avoir été qu’un masque cachant une théologie belliqueuse. »

Cette attitude silencieusement aggressive est fort répandue dans le monde religieux. On la retrouve par exemple, aujourd’hui encore, dans la « taqqiya » des Shi’ites.

L’idée de « guerre sainte » faisait aussi partie de l’eschatologie essénienne, comme en témoigne le « rouleau de la guerre » (War Scroll, 1QM), conservé à Jérusalem, qui est aussi connu comme le rouleau de « la Guerre des Fils de la Lumière contre les Fils de l’Obscur ».

Philon d’Alexandrie, pétrie de culture grecque, considérait que les Esséniens avaient une « philosophie barbare », mais « qu’ils étaient en un sens, les Brahmanes des Juifs, une élite parmi l’élite. »

Cléarque de Soles, philosophe péripatéticien du 4ème siècle av. J.-C., disciple d’Aristote, avait déjà émis l’opinion que les Juifs descendaient des Brahmanes, et que leur sagesse était un « héritage légitime » de l’Inde. Cette idée se répandit largement, et fut apparemment acceptée par les Juifs de cette époque, ainsi qu’en témoigne le fait que Philon d’Alexandrieii et Flavius Josèpheiii y font référence, comme une idée allant de soi.

La « philosophie barbare » des Esséniens, et la « sagesse barbare » des premiers Chrétiens ont un point commun. Dans les deux cas, elles signalent l’influence d’idées émanant de la Perse, de l’Oxus ou de l’Indus.

Parmi ces idées très « orientales », l’une est particulièrement puissante, celle du double de l’âme, ou de l’âme double, – suivant les points de vue.

Le texte de la Règle de la communauté, trouvé à Qumran, donne une indication : « Il a créé l’homme pour régner sur le monde, et lui a attribué deux esprits avec lesquels il doit marcher jusqu’au temps où Il reviendra : l’esprit de vérité et l’esprit de mensonge (ruah ha-emet ve ruah ha-avel). »iv

Il y a un large accord parmi les chercheurs pour déceler dans cette vision anthropologique une influence iranienne. Shaul Shaked écrit à ce sujet: « On peut concevoir que des contacts entre Juifs et Iraniens ont permis de formuler une théologie juive, qui, tout en suivant des motifs traditionnels du judaïsme, en vint à ressembler de façon étroite à la vision iranienne du monde. »v

G. Stroumsa note pour sa part que cette idée d’une dualité dans l’âme est fort similaire à l’idée rabbinique des deux instincts de base du bien et du mal présents dans l’âme humaine (yetser ha-ra’, yetser ha-tov)vi.

Cette conception dualiste semble avoir été, dès une haute époque, largement disséminée. Loin d’être réservée aux seuls gnostiques ou aux manichéens, qui ont sans doute trouvé dans l’ancienne Perse leurs sources les plus anciennes, elle avait, on le voit, pénétré par plusieurs voies la pensée juive.

En revanche, les premiers Chrétiens avaient une vue différente quant à la réalité de ce dualisme, ou de ce manichéisme.

Augustin, après avoir été un temps manichéen lui-même, finit par affirmer qu’il ne peut y avoir un « esprit du mal », puisque toutes les âmes viennent de Dieu.vii Dans son Contre Faustus, il argumente : « Comme ils disent que tout être vivant a deux âmes, l’une issue de la lumière, l’autre issue des ténèbres, n’est-il pas clair alors que l’âme bonne s’en va au moment de la mort, tandis que l’âme mauvaise reste ? »viii

Origène a une autre interprétation. Toute âme est assistée par deux anges, un ange de justice et un ange d’iniquitéix. Il n’y a pas deux âmes opposées, mais plutôt une âme supérieure et une autre en position inférieure.

Le manichéisme lui-même variait sur cette question. Il présentait deux conceptions différentes du dualisme inhérent à l’âme. La conception horizontale mettait les deux âmes, l’une bonne, l’autre mauvaise, en conflit direct. L’autre conception, verticale, mettait en relation l’âme avec sa contrepartie céleste, son « ange gardien ». L’ange gardien de Mani, le Paraclet (« l’ange intercesseur »), le Saint Esprit sont autant de figures possible de cette âme jumelle, divine.

La conception d’un Esprit céleste formant un « couple » (suzugia) avec chaque âme, avait été théorisée par Tatien le Syrien, au 2ème siècle ap. J.-C., comme l’a rappelé Erik Peterson.

Stroumsa fait remarquer que « cette conception, qui était déjà répandue en Iran, reflète clairement des formes de pensée shamanistes, selon lesquelles l’âme peut aller et venir en dehors de l’individu sous certaines conditions. »x

Il est tentant, dès lors, de penser que l’idée d’âme « double » ou « couplée » avec le monde des esprits fait partie du bagage anthropologique depuis l’aube de l’humanité.

L’âme d’Horus flottant au-dessus du corps du Dieu mort, les anges de la tradition juive, le « daimon » des Grecs, les âmes dédoublées des gnostiques, des manichéens, ou des Iraniens, ou, plus anciennement encore, les expériences des shamans, témoignent d’ une profonde analogie, indépendamment des époques, des cultures, des religions.

Il ressort de toutes ces traditions, si diverses, une leçon unique. L’âme n’est pas seulement un principe de vie, attaché à un corps terrestre, destiné à disparaître après la mort. Elle est aussi attachée à un principe supérieur, spirituel, qui la garde et la guide.

La science moderne a fait récemment un pas dans cette direction de pensée, en postulant l’hypothèse que « l’esprit » de l’homme n’était pas localisé seulement dans le cerveau proprement dit, mais qu’il se diffusait dans l’affectif, le symbolique, l’imaginaire et le social, selon des modalités aussi diverses que difficiles à objectiver.

Il y a là un champ de recherche d’une fécondité inimaginable. L’on pourra peut-être un jour caractériser de manière tangible la variété des imprégnations de « l’esprit » dans le monde.

iQumran P. IX. I. Cité in Guy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

iiPhilon d’Alexandrie. Cf. Quod omnis probus liber sit. 72-94 et Vita Mosis 2. 19-20

iiiFlavius Josèphe. Contre Apion. 1. 176-182

ivQumran. Règle de la communauté. III, 18

vShaul Shaked. Qumran and Iran : Further considerations. 1972, in G. Stroumsa. op. cit

viB.Yoma 69b, Baba Bathra 16a, Gen Rabba 9.9)

viiAugustin. De duabus animabus.

viiiAugustin. Contra faustum. 6,8

ixOrigène. Homélies sur saint Luc.

xGuy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

Échec à Maât


Il y a un an déjà, dans l’Égypte de Sissi, deux églises coptes ont subi des attaques-suicides, pendant le dimanche des Rameaux, au mois d’avril 2017. Cette fête chrétienne, une semaine avant Pâques, rappelle le jour où Jésus, monté sur un âne, fit son entrée à Jérusalem, accueilli par des habitants en liesse, brandissant des rameaux et des palmes en signe d’enthousiasme. Jésus fut arrêté peu après, et crucifié.

Les djihadistes sont venus à Tanta et à Alexandrie. Ils se sont fait exploser au milieu de la foule des fidèles. Le djihad mondialisé choisit de préférence des cibles faibles, et cherche à provoquer la haine et la rage, à envenimer le ressentiment entre les peuples, à dresser les religions les unes contre les autres.

La politique du président égyptien Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, qui vient d’être réélu, est sans doute pour quelque chose dans la radicalisation de Daech dans ce pays. Mais beaucoup d’autres causes, plus lointaines, plus profondes, ont contribué à ce énième attentat.

Le New York Timesi a écrit après l’attentat un éditorial ambigu et quelque peu hypocrite, dont voici un extrait : « The struggle against terrorism is not a « war » that can be won if only the right strategy is found. It is an ongoing struggle against enormously complex and shifting forces that feed on despair, resentment and hatred, and have the means in a connected world to spread their venom far and wide. »

Pour les éditorialistes du New York Times, le « djihad » n’est pas une « guerre» qui pourrait être gagnée, par exemple grâce à une « bonne stratégie ». Ce n’est pas une « guerre », c’est un « combat » continuel, contre des forces d’une « énorme complexité », qui se déplacent sans cesse, et se nourrissent du « désespoir, du ressentiment et de la haine ».

Pas un mot cependant dans l’article pour tenter d’éclairer cette « complexité » ou pour approfondir l’origine de ce « désespoir », de ce « ressentiment » et de cette « haine ». Le New York Times se contente de recommander au lecteur de ne pas céder lui-même au désespoir, à la panique ou à la haine. Pas un mot sur la politique des puissances occidentales dans cette région du monde depuis plus d’un siècle. Pas un mot sur la responsabilité qui incombe à des pays comme l’Angleterre ou comme la France, pour s’être partagé les dépouilles de l’Empire Ottoman après la 1ère guerre mondiale.

Pas un mot sur la décolonisation, après la 2ème guerre mondiale, ou les conséquences de la guerre froide. L’implication intéressée de puissances comme les États-Unis et l’URSS n’est pas analysée.

Ni bien sûr le conflit israélo-palestinien. L’effondrement de la Libye facilité par une coalition de pays occidentaux, et prôné par un président français aujourd’hui accusé de corruption, ne prête pas non plus à quelque analyse.

Le New York Times ne peut pas faire un cours d’histoire, et récapituler tous les malheurs du monde dans chacun de ses éditoriaux. Mais la focalisation de cet article particulier sur le « désespoir », la « haine » et le « ressentiment » des djihadistes mériterait au moins un début d’explication.

Écrire sur ces sujets est difficile, mais ce n’est pas « extraordinairement complexe ». Même un Donald Trump, en pleine campagne électorale, et avec le succès que l’on sait, a été capable d’en traiter certains aspects à coup de tweets, et de désigner la responsabilité directe des Bush, père et fils, dans ce « combat » sans fin.

Le porte-parole de la Maison Blanche a dû s’excuser publiquement pour avoir affirmé que même Hitler n’avait pas utilisé d’armes chimiques pendant la 2ème guerre mondiale. Cette affirmation, à la fois fantaisiste et scandaleuse, était censée permettre de souligner la gravité des crimes d’Assad, et de justifier une aggravation des bombardements en Syrie, par les États-Unis, accentuant la confusion générale, et rendant plus difficile encore la perception d’une possible issue politique das cette partie du monde.

Dans quelques siècles, peut-être, les lointains descendants des électeurs occidentaux au nom desquels ces politiques ont été mises en œuvre, analyseront les responsabilités et jugeront les stratégies déployées au Moyen Orient tout au long du dernier siècle, après le lancement du « Grand jeu » (Great Game) déployé pour le plus grand bien de l’Empire britannique.

Aujourd’hui, l’Empire est mort. Les quelques miettes qui en restent, comme Gibraltar, pourraient se révéler gênantes pour les ultranationalistes britanniques qui rêvent de Brexit, et qui tentent de renouer avec la gloire de jadis, dans une splendide indépendance.

Essayons un peu d’utopie. Demain, ou dans quelques siècles, les peuples pourraient décider d’en finir avec l’Histoire « longue », et ses lourdes conséquences. Il suffit de se retourner vers les profondeurs du passé, pour voir s’étager les plans, se différencier les âges. Demain, l’époque moderne tout entière ne sera plus qu’un moment, démodé et aboli, d’un passé révolu, et un témoignage exorbitant de la folie des hommes.

L’islam n’a que treize siècles d’existence, le christianisme vingt siècles et le judaïsme mosaïque environ trente deux siècles.

L’Égypte, par contraste, ne manque pas de mémoire. Du haut des pyramides, bien plus de quarante siècles contemplent les banlieues du Caire. Deux mille ans avant l’apparition du judaïsme, l’Égypte ancienne possédait déjà une religion fort élaborée, dans laquelle la question essentielle n’était pas celle du « monothéisme » et du « polythéisme », mais plutôt la dialectique profonde de l’Un (le Dieu créateur, originaire), et du Multiple (la myriade de Ses manifestations, de Ses noms).

Dans les Textes des sarcophages, qui font partie des plus anciens textes écrits de l’humanité, on lit que le Dieu créateur a déclaré : « Je n’ai pas ordonné que (l’humanité) fasse le mal (jzft) ; leurs cœurs ont désobéi à mes propos. »ii

L’égyptologue Erik Hornung en donne cette interprétation: les êtres humains sont responsables de ce mal. Ils sont aussi responsables de leur naissance, et de l’obscurité qui permet au mal de s’insérer dans leurs cœurs.

Les Dieux de l’Égypte peuvent se montrer terrifiants, imprévisibles, mais contrairement aux hommes, ils ne veulent pas le Mal. Même Seth, le meurtrier d’Osiris, n’était pas le symbole du Mal absolu, mais seulement l’exécutant nécessaire au développement de l’ordre du monde.

« La bataille, la confrontation constante, la confusion, et la remise en question de l’ordre établi, actions dans lesquelles s’engagea Seth, sont des caractéristiques nécessaires du monde existant et du désordre limité qui est essentiel à un ordre vivant. Les dieux et les hommes doivent cependant veiller à ce que le désordre n’en arrive jamais à renverser la justice et l’ordre ; telle est la signification de leur obligation commune à l’égard de maât. »iii

Le concept de Maât dans l’Égypte ancienne représente l’ordre du monde, la juste mesure des choses. C’est l’harmonie initiale et finale, l’état fondamental voulu par le Dieu créateur. « Tel l’« œil d’Horus » blessé et perpétuellement soigné, Maât symbolise cet état premier du monde. »iv

Les Égyptiens considéraient que le Maât était une substance qui fait « vivre » le monde entier, qui fait « vivre » les vivants et les morts, les dieux et les hommes. Les Textes des Sarcophages disent que les dieux « vivent sur Maât».

L’idée du Maât est symbolisée par une déesse assisen portant sur la tête le hiéroglyphe d’une plume d’autruche. Le pharaon Ramsès II est représenté offrant cette image symbolique de Maât au Dieu Ptah.

L’offrande de Maât a une forte charge de sens. Ce que le Dieu Ptah veut c’est être connu dans le cœur des hommes, car c’est là que l’œuvre divine de création peut acquérir sa véritable signification.

Maât a émané du Dieu créateur lors de la création. Mais c’est par l’intermédiaire des hommes que Maât doit revenir à Dieu. Maât représente donc, dans la religion égyptienne, le « lien » ou « l’alliance » originaire, entre Dieu et l’homme. C’est ce « lien », cette « alliance », qu’il faut faire vivre avec Maât.

Si les hommes se détournent de cette « alliance », si les hommes gardent le silence, s’ils font preuve d’indifférence à l’égard de Maât, alors ils tombent dans le « non-existant », –selon l’ancienne religion égyptienne. Ce silence, cette indifférence, témoignent seulement de leur néant.

Les corps coptes horriblement déchiquetés par les explosions à Alexandrie et Tanta sont à l’image du corps démembré d’Osiris. Par la force de son esprit, par la puissance de sa « magie », Isis permit la résurrection d’Osiris. De façon analogue, les Rameaux annoncent Pâques et la résurrection du Dieu.

Quelle pourrait être la métaphore mondiale, actuelle, qui serait l’équivalent de la « résurrection » d’Osiris ou de la « résurrection » de Pâques?

Quelle parole actuelle pourrait-elle combler l’absence de sens, l’abyssale absurdité, la violence de la haine, dans le monde ?

Du sang égyptien coule à nouveau dans le Delta du Nil, des corps y sont violemment démembrés.

Où est l’Isis qui viendra les ressusciter ?

Où est l’Esprit de Maât ?

iÉdition du 12 avril 2017

iiErik Hornung. Les Dieux de l’Égypte. 1971

iiiIbid.

ivIbid.

La philosophie barbare des Esséniens, « Brahmanes des Juifs »


Tôt dans l’histoire apparaît l’idée d’une religion universelle – malgré les obstacles posés par les traditions et l’intérêt des prêtres et des princes.

Cette idée n’entrait pas aisément dans les cadres de pensée, ni dans les représentations du monde bâties par des religions tribales, nationales, ou, a fortiori, par des sectes exclusives, élitistes, réservées à des initiés privilégiés ou à quelques élus.

Mais cinq siècles avant le prophète Muhammad, le prophète persan Mani affirmait déjà qu’il était le « sceau des prophètes ». Il lui revenait en conséquence de fonder une religion universelle. Le manichéisme eut d’ailleurs son heure de gloire. Augustin, qui l’embrassa un temps, témoigne de son expansion et de son succès d’alors dans les territoires contrôlés par Rome, et de son emprise durable sur les esprits.

Le manichéisme promeut un système dualiste de pensée, axé sur le combat éternel du Bien et du Mal ; il n’est pas certain que ces idées aient disparu, de nos jours.

Avant Mani, les premiers Chrétiens se voyaient aussi porteurs d’un message universel. Ils ne se percevaient déjà plus comme Juifs — ou Gentils. Ils se pensaient comme une troisième sorte d’hommes (« triton genos », « tertium genus »), des trans-humains avant la lettre. Ils se voyaient comme les promoteurs d’une nouvelle sagesse, « barbare » du point de vue des Grecs, « scandaleuse » pour les Juifs, – transcendant la prégnance de la Loi et celle de la Raison.

Les Chrétiens n’étaient pas une nation parmi les nations, mais « une nation issue des nations » selon la formule d’Aphrahat, sage persan du 4ème siècle.

Aux dichotomies habituelles, celle des Grecs les opposant aux Barbares, ou celle des Juifs, les opposant aux Goyim, les Chrétiens incarnaient donc une « nation » d’un nouveau type, une « nation » non « nationale », mais purement spirituelle, une « nation » qui serait comme une âme dans le corps du monde (ou suivant une autre image, le « sel de la terre »i).

L’idée d’une religion universelle côtoyait alors, il importe de le dire, des positions absolument contraires, exclusives, et même antagonistes au dernier degré, comme celles des Esséniens.

Un texte trouvé à Qumran, près de la mer Morte, prône la haine contre tous ceux qui ne sont pas membres de la secte, tout en insistant sur l’importance que cette « haine » doit rester secrète. Le membre de la secte essénienne « doit cacher l’enseignement de la Loi aux hommes de fausseté (anshei ha-’arel), mais il doit annoncer la vraie connaissance et le jugement droit à ceux qui ont choisi la voie. (…) Haine éternelle dans un esprit de secret pour les hommes de perdition ! (sin’at ‘olam ‘im anshei shahat be-ruah hasher !) »ii .

G. Stroumsa commente : « La conduite pacifique des Esséniens vis-à-vis du monde environnant apparaît maintenant n’avoir été qu’un masque cachant une théologie belliqueuse. » Cette attitude se retrouve aujourd’hui encore dans la « taqqiya » des Shi’ites, par exemple.

Ajoutons que l’idée de « guerre sainte » faisait aussi partie de l’eschatologie essénienne, comme en témoigne le « rouleau de la guerre » (War Scroll, 1QM), conservé à Jérusalem, qui est aussi connu comme le rouleau de « la Guerre des Fils de la Lumière contre les Fils de l’Obscur ».

Philon d’Alexandrie, pétri de culture grecque, considérait que les Esséniens avaient une « philosophie barbare », et « qu’ils étaient en un sens, les Brahmanes des Juifs, une élite parmi l’élite. »

Cléarque de Soles, philosophe péripatéticien du 4ème siècle av. J.-C., disciple d’Aristote, avait aussi considéré que les Juifs descendaient des Brahmanes, et que leur sagesse était un « héritage légitime » de l’Inde. Cette idée se répandit largement, et fut apparemment acceptée par les Juifs de cette époque, ainsi qu’en témoigne le fait que Philon d’Alexandrieiii et Flavius Josèpheiv y font naturellement référence.

La « philosophie barbare » des Esséniens, et la « sagesse barbare » des premiers Chrétiens ont un point commun : elles pointent l’une et l’autre vers des idées émanant d’un Orient plus lointain, celui de la Perse, de l’Oxus et même, in fine, de l’Indus.

Parmi les idées orientales, l’une est particulièrement puissante. Celle du double de l’âme, ou encore de l’âme double, suivant les points de vue.

Le texte de la Règle de la communauté, trouvé à Qumran, donne une indication : « Il a créé l’homme pour régner sur le monde, et lui a attribué deux esprits avec lesquels il doit marcher jusqu’au temps où Il reviendra : l’esprit de vérité et l’esprit de mensonge (ruah ha-emet ve ruah ha-avel). »v

Il y a un large accord parmi les chercheurs pour déceler dans cette anthropologie une influence iranienne. Shaul Shaked écrit à ce sujet: « On peut concevoir que des contacts entre Juifs et Iraniens ont permis de formuler une théologie juive, qui, tout en suivant des motifs traditionnels du judaïsme, en vint à ressembler de façon étroite à la vision iranienne du monde. »vi

G. Stroumsa note en complément qu’une telle dualité dans l’âme se retrouve dans l’idée rabbinique des deux instincts de base du bien et du mal présents dans l’âme humaine (yetser ha-ra’, yetser ha-tov)vii.

Cette conception a été, dès une haute époque, largement disséminée. Loin d’être réservée aux gnostiques et aux manichéens, qui semblent avoir trouvé dans l’ancienne Perse leurs sources les plus anciennes, elle avait, on le voit, pénétré par plusieurs voies la pensée juive.

Mais elle suscitait aussi de fortes oppositions. Les Chrétiens, notamment, défendaient des vues différentes.

Augustin affirme qu’il ne peut y avoir un « esprit du mal », puisque toutes les âmes viennent de Dieu.viii Dans son Contre Faustus, il argumente : « Comme ils disent que tout être vivant a deux âmes, l’une issue de la lumière, l’autre issue des ténèbres, n’est-il pas clair alors que l’âme bonne s’en va au moment de la mort, tandis que l’âme mauvaise reste ? »ix

Origène a une autre interprétation encore : toute âme est assistée par deux anges, un ange de justice et un ange d’iniquitéx. Il n’y a pas deux âmes opposées, mais plutôt une âme supérieure et une autre en position inférieure.

Le manichéisme lui-même variait sur ce délicat problème. Il présentait deux conceptions différentes du dualisme inhérent à l’âme. La conception horizontale mettait les deux âmes, l’une bonne, l’autre mauvaise, en conflit. L’autre conception, verticale, mettait en relation l’âme avec sa contrepartie céleste, son « ange gardien ». L’ange gardien de Mani, le Paraclet (« l’ange intercesseur »), le Saint Esprit sont autant de figures possible de cette âme jumelle, divine.

Cette conception d’un Esprit céleste formant un « couple » (suzugia) avec chaque âme, avait été théorisée par Tatien le Syrien, au 2ème siècle ap. J.-C., ainsi que le note Erik Peterson.

Stroumsa fait remarquer que « cette conception, qui était déjà répandue en Iran, reflète clairement des formes de pensée shamanistes, selon lesquelles l’âme peut aller et venir en dehors de l’individu sous certaines conditions. »xi

L’idée de l’âme d’Osiris ou d’Horus flottant au-dessus du corps du Dieu mort, les anges de la tradition juive, le « daimon » grec, les âmes dédoublées des gnostiques, des manichéens, ou des Iraniens, ou, plus anciennement encore, les expériences des shamans, par leur profondes analogies, témoignent de l’existence de « constantes anthropologiques », dont l’étude comparée des religions anciennes donne un aperçu.

Toutes ces traditions convergent en ceci : l’âme n’est pas seulement un principe de vie, attaché à un corps terrestre, qui serait destiné à disparaître après la mort.

Elle est aussi rattachée à un principe supérieur, spirituel, qui la garde et la guide.

La science a fait récemment un pas dans cette direction, pressentie depuis plusieurs millénaires, en démontrant que « l’esprit » de l’homme n’était pas localisé seulement dans le cerveau proprement dit, mais qu’il se diffusait tout autour de lui, dans l’affectif, le symbolique, l’imaginaire et le social.

L’on pourra peut-être un jour objectiver de manière tangible cette intuition si ancienne, si universelle. En attendant, concluons qu’il est difficile de se contenter d’une description étroitement matérialiste, mécanique, du monde.

iMt, 5,13

iiQumran P. IX. I. Cité in Guy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

iiiPhilon d’Alexandrie. Cf. Quod omnis probus liber sit. 72-94 et Vita Mosis 2. 19-20

ivFlavius Josèphe. Contre Apion. 1. 176-182

vQumran. Règle de la communauté. III, 18

viShaul Shaked. Qumran and Iran : Further considerations. 1972, in G. Stroumsa. op. cit

viiB.Yoma 69b, Baba Bathra 16a, Gen Rabba 9.9)

viiiAugustin. De duabus animabus.

ixAugustin. Contra faustum. 6,8

xOrigène. Homélies sur saint Luc.

xiGuy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

Le jus des morts et le parfum du Dieu


Dans la période archaïque de l’Égypte ancienne, on ne momifiait pas les corps. On dépeçait les chairs, on mettait le cadavre en morceaux, on disloquait le squelette. Un fois le squelette désarticulé on en rassemblait les fragments pour le reconstituer, et lui donner la position d’un embryon – comme l’attestent les cadavres retrouvés dans les nécropoles archaïques.

Une inscription datant de Pépi 1er, qui régna de -2289 à -2255 av. J.-C., dit ceci : « Mout te donne ta tête, elle te fait cadeau de tes os, elle assemble tes chairs, elle t’apporte ton cœur dans ton ventre. (…) L’œil d’Horus a mis en ordre les os du Dieu et rassemblé ses chairs. On offre au Dieu sa tête, ses os, on établit sa tête sur ses os par-devant Seb. »

Il s’agit de la reconstitution du corps du Dieu Osiris, démembré par son meurtrier, Seth. C’est le fils d’Osiris, Horus, le Dieu épervier, qui la réalise. Pendant ce temps, l’âme d’Osiris est réfugiée dans l’œil d’Horus.

Le rituel d’Abydos, dans son 12ème tableau, donne plus de détails encore. « Horus est venu plein de ses humeurs pour embrasser son père Osiris ; il l’a trouvé à sa place, au pays des gazelles, et Osiris s’est empli de l’œil qu’il a enfanté. Ah ! Ammon-Râ, je suis venu vers toi ; sois stable ; emplis-toi de fard sorti de l’œil d’Horus, emplis-toi de lui : il ordonne tes os, il réunit tes membres, il assemble tes chairs, il laisse aller toutes tes humeurs mauvaises à terre. Tu as pris son parfum, il est doux son parfum pour toi, comme Râ quand il sort de l’horizon (…) Ammon-Râ, le parfum de l’œil d’Horus est pour toi, aussi les dieux suivants d’Osiris sont-ils gracieux pour toi. Tu as pris la couronne, tu es muni des formes d’Osiris, tu es lumineux là-bas plus que les lumineux, d’après l’ordre d’Horus lui-même, le seigneur des générations – Ô cette huile d’Horus, ô cette huile de Seth ! Horus a offert son œil qu’il a enlevé à ses adversaires, Seth ne s’est point caché en lui, Horus s’en emplit, muni de ses formes divines ; l’œil d’Horus unit son parfum à toi. »

Thoth est parti à la recherche de l’œil d’Horus. Il le trouve, et le lui rapporte. Horus, remis en possession de son œil, peut le présenter à son père Osiris, et lui rendre son âme, qui était restée cachée tout ce temps dans cet œil.

Horus embrasse le Dieu Osiris et le couronne roi du Ciel.

Qu’est-ce que cela signifie ?

A la mort du Dieu Osiris, comme à la mort de tout autre dieu et de tout homme, l’âme s’enfuit et prend résidence dans l’œil solaire, l’œil d’Horus. Après les cérémonies et la momification, vient le moment de rendre l’âme au corps. Pour cela, il faut retrouver l’âme qui est dans l’œil envolé et la rendre à Horus.

La plupart du temps c’est Thoth qui est chargé de cette tâche. C’est au moment où Horus et Thoth embrassent le Dieu, que son âme lui est rendue.

Rien de tout cela n’est mécanique, automatique. On a affaire à des corps démembrés et en voie de décomposition avancée, ne l’oublions pas. Nous sommes aux limites du supportable. C’est dans cette puanteur, pourtant, que le divin se révèle. « Le Dieu vient, muni de ses membres qu’il avait cachés dans l’œil de son corps. Les résines du Dieu sortent de lui pour parfumer les humeurs sorties de ses chairs divines, les sécrétions tombées à terre. Tous les dieux lui ont donné ceci, que tu te livres parmi eux comme un maître de la crainte. »

L’odeur de ce corps, qui n’est plus en putréfaction, parce qu’il a été momifié, atteste de la divinité du processus, du miracle qui se déroule, de par le respect des rites.

Il faut revenir aux phénomènes les plus terre-à-terre du processus de la mort. Voici un cadavre ; s’en exhalent des humeurs, et en suintent des jus, des « résines ». Le génie égyptien voit là à l’œuvre une présence divine.

« Le parfum de la résine et la résine elle-même sont des dieux qui, confondus avec la divinité, résidaient aussi dans l’œil d’Horus. »

Dans la langue arabe, le mot « œil » est le même que le mot « source ». Dans la culture du désert, l’humeur vitrée que contient le globe oculaire est assimilée à une eau pure, une eau qui permet de voir. L’eau de l’œil est la source de la vision.

Ce qui importe aux anciens Égyptiens va bien au-delà de l’eau, de l’œil et de la vision. La « résine » exhalée par le mort, son parfum, l’onctuosité de ce « jus », de cette humeur, et son odeur, sont eux-mêmes des « dieux ». On en déduit que c’est l’action même de la transcendance divine qui est approchée par ces métaphores.

Le souffle, la respiration, l’odeur, la sécrétion, le parfum n’ont rien de visible. Nous sommes dans l’invisible, dans l’impalpable. L’œil ne voit pas le souffle, il voit pas l’invisible. Il ne voit pas ce qui est caché et encore moins ce qu’il cache.

« L’œil d’Horus te cachait dans ses larmes ».

Cette image transcende les époques, les âges, les civilisations, les religions.

« L’œil d’Horus te cachait dans ses larmes, et son parfum vient vers toi, Ammon-Râ, seigneur de Karnak, il s’élève vers toi parmi les Dieux. Parfum divin, deux fois bon, élève-toi comme un Dieu. »

La vision la plus sublime n’est qu’un bref avant-goût. Elle n’est pas la fin du voyage. Le goût des larmes cachent encore le Dieu. Bien plus loin, au-delà des images, au-delà de la saveur amère ou douce, s’élève en silence le parfum du Dieu. Et ce parfum de l’âme est encore un Dieu, qui annonce le Dieu caché, Ammon.

Un Osiris juif


 

Le Dieu Osiris est mort assassiné par son frère Seth, lequel le découpe ensuite en morceaux, qu’il répartit dans toute l’Égypte. Le papyrus Jumilhac dit que la tête était à Abydos, les mâchoires en Haute Égypte, les intestins à Pithom, les poumons à Béhemet du Delta, le phallus à Mendès, les deux jambes à Iakémet, les doigts dans les 13ème et 14ème nomes, un bras dans le 20ème nome et le cœur à Athribis du Delta.

Plutarque, qui raconte plus tardivement l’histoire d’Osiris, donne une répartition différente. L’important c’est qu’Osiris, Dieu mort et ressuscité, incarne le cœur de la croyance des Égyptiens anciens en la résurrection des morts et en la vie éternelle.

L’idée d’un Dieu mort et ressuscité est un paradigme, dont on ne peut s’empêcher d’apprécier l’analogie avec la figure de Jésus Christ, Dieu crucifié et ressuscité.

Plusieurs papyrus précieux racontent la saga du Dieu Osiris, ses nombreuses péripéties. Meurtres, ruses, trahisons, transformations magiques abondent. Les lire aujourd’hui, dans une époque à la fois désenchantée et avide de passions religieuses dévoyées, peut se concevoir comme une plongée plusieurs millénaires en arrière, une plongée dans l’aube d’un sentiment naissant, profondément religieux, dans toutes les acceptions de ce terme ambigu.

Le papyrus Jumilhac, conservé à Paris, raconte la vengeance du fils d’Osiris, Anubis, qui s’est lancé à la poursuite de Seth, l’assassin de son père. Seth, se sachant menacé, prend la forme d’Anubis lui-même, pour tenter de brouiller les pistes, avant de prendre bien d’autres formes encore.

« Alors Imakhouemânkh marcha à la tête des dieux qui veillent sur Osiris ; il trouva Demib et lui coupa la tête, si bien qu’il fut oint de son [sang]. [Seth] vint à sa recherche, après s’être transformé en Anubis (…) Puis Isis dépeça Seth enfonçant ses dents dans son dos, et Thot prononça ses charmes contre lui. Rê dit alors : « Qu’on attribue ce siège au « Fatigué » ; comme il s’est régénéré ! Comme il est beau ! Et que Seth soit placé sous lui en qualité de siège. C’est juste, à cause du mal qu’il a fait à tous les membres d’Osiris. » (…) Mais Seth s’enfuit dans le désert et fit sa transformation en panthère de ce nome. Anubis, cependant, s’empara de lui, et Thot lut ses formules magiques contre lui, de nouveau. Aussi tomba-t-il à terre devant eux. Anubis le lia par les bras et les jambes et Seth fut consumé dans la flamme, de la tête aux pieds, dans tout son corps, à l’Est de la salle auguste. L’odeur de sa graisse ayant atteint le ciel, elle se répandit dans ce lieu magnifique, et Rê et les dieux la tinrent pour agréable. Puis Anubis fendit la peau de Seth, l’arracha et mit sa fourrure sur lui (…)

Seth fit sa transformation en Anubis afin que les portiers ne pussent pas le reconnaître (…) Anubis le poursuivit avec les dieux de sa suite, et le rejoignit. Mais Seth prenant l’aspect d’un taureau rendit sa forme méconnaissable. Anubis cependant le lia par les bras et les jambes, et lui coupa le phallus et les testicules (…)

Après quoi Anubis entra dans la Ouâbet pour vérifier l’état de son père, Osiris, et il le trouva sain et sauf, les chairs fermes et fraîches. Il se transforma en faucon, ouvrit ses ailes derrière son père Osiris, et derrière le vase qui contenait les humeurs de ce Dieu (…) il étendit les ailes en qualité de faucon pour voler grâce à elles, à la recherche de son propre œil, et il le rapporta intact à son maître. »

Seth se transforme sans cesse, en Anubis, puis en panthère, enfin en taureau. Mais Anubis l’emporte toujours, avec l’aide de Thot. Puis Seth est transformé en « siège » d’Osiris ou en « fourrure » d’Anubis. Mais c’est la transformation finale qui est la plus agréable au Dieu suprême, Rê : lorsque Seth est consumé en flammes, et en odeur de graisse, alors il se répand dans le Ciel magnifique.

Il est intéressant de comparer la transformation finale de Seth en flammes et en odeur à celle d’Anubis qui prend la forme du faucon. Ce faucon, Horus, est l’une des divinités les plus anciennes, les plus archaïques du panthéon égyptien. Il représente, dans le cadre osirien, le fils posthume d’Osiris et d’Isis, qui vole au-dessus de son père mort, à la recherche de son œil, et contribue à lui rendre la vie.

Le papyrus Jumilhac évoque la légende d’Horus en son chapitre XXI, et le compare à une vigne. « Quant au vignoble, c’est le cadre qui entoure les deux yeux pour les protéger ; quant au raisin, c’est la pupille de l’œil d’Horus ; quant au vin qu’on en fait, ce sont les larmes d’Horus. » i

Pas de comparaison sans raison ! La métaphore du vin représente les larmes du fils du Dieu Osiris, assimilé à une « vigne ». Comment ne pas penser au vin, symbolisant le sang du Christ, fils sacrifié du Dieu vivant ?

iXIV,14,15, Trad. Jacques Vandier.

Le faucon persan


 

Un ghazal de Rûmî a pour premiers vers :

L’amour du bien-aimé m’a retranché de mon âme.

L’âme au dedans de l’amour s’est retranchée de soi.

Cette traduction de Christian Jambet est fort bonne, naturellement, quoique un peu précieuse, contournée, trop écrite, ‘française’. Le persan est une langue fascinante, indo-européenne dans sa structure profonde, mais aussi fort mâtinée d’arabe, et cela depuis le 7ème siècle. Sa graphie lui a été imposée par les conquérants. Il en résulte une langue qui est une étonnante synthèse de l’Inde, de l’Europe et de l’Arabie, et qui possède une certaine capacité à créer des ponts entre ces mondes qui se côtoient.

Après réflexion et quelques recherches, je préfère pour les vers de Rûmî une traduction presque mot à mot, pour rester plus proche de la pensée initiale.

 

عشق جانان مرا زجان ببريد

[‘ishq jânân marâ z jân bebarîd]

L’amour de mon Aimé m’a mis hors de mon âme – dans le froid.

جان بعشق اندرون زجود برهيد

[jân b ‘ishiq androun z joud berhïd]

L’âme dans l’amour, dans sa profondeur – est hors d’elle, en liberté.

Il s’agit d’un poème d’amour mystique. Des mots comme « retrancher » paraissent loin du sujet.

Le ghazal continue ainsi :

Comme l’âme est nouvelle et l’amour éternel,

Elle reste ici, dans l’existence, mais là-haut est le point suprême.

L’amour de l’Aimé est semblable à l’aimant,

Il attire l’âme tout près de lui.

Il fait s’envoler loin de soi le faucon de l’âme.

L’âme perdue loin d’elle-même se met à vivre.

Après quoi elle revient.

Les liens de l’amour soudain l’enveloppent.

Il lui donne un suc à boire, fait de l’amour vrai.

Et il n’y a plus en elle d’autre foi.

C’est là le signe de l’amour qui commence.

Personne n’atteint le point où il finit.

La métaphore du faucon, faut-il le souligner ?, a été employée depuis longtemps par les anciens Égyptiens pour figurer le Dieu Horus. Le faucon est censé pouvoir regarder le soleil en face.

Le parfum du Dieu caché


Dans la période archaïque de l’Égypte ancienne, on ne momifiait pas les corps. On dépeçait les chairs, on mettait le cadavre en morceaux, on disloquait le squelette. Un fois le squelette désarticulé on en rassemblait les fragments pour le reconstituer, et lui donner la position d’un embryon – comme l’attestent les cadavres retrouvés dans les nécropoles archaïques.

Une inscription datant de Pépi 1er, qui régna de -2289 à -2255 av. J.-C., dit ceci : « Mout te donne ta tête, elle te fait cadeau de tes os, elle assemble tes chairs, elle t’apporte ton cœur dans ton ventre. (…) L’œil d’Horus a mis en ordre les os du Dieu et rassemblé ses chairs. On offre au Dieu sa tête, ses os, on établit sa tête sur ses os par-devant Seb. »

Il s’agit de la reconstitution du corps du Dieu Osiris, démembré par son meurtrier, Seth. C’est le fils d’Osiris, Horus, le Dieu épervier, qui procède à cette reconstitution. Pendant ce temps, l’âme d’Osiris est réfugiée dans l’œil d’Horus.

Le rituel d’Abydos, dans son 12ème tableau, donne plus de détails encore. « Horus est venu plein de ses humeurs pour embrasser son père Osiris ; il l’a trouvé à sa place, au pays des gazelles, et Osiris s’est empli de l’œil qu’il a enfanté. Ah ! Ammon-Râ, je suis venu vers toi ; sois stable ; emplis-toi de fard sorti de l’œil d’Horus, emplis-toi de lui : il ordonne tes os, il réunit tes membres, il assemble tes chairs, il laisse aller toutes tes humeurs mauvaises à terre. Tu as pris son parfum, il est doux son parfum pour toi, comme Râ quand il sort de l’horizon (…) Ammon-Râ, le parfum de l’œil d’Horus est pour toi, aussi les dieux suivants d’Osiris sont-ils gracieux pour toi. Tu as pris la couronne, tu es muni des formes d’Osiris, tu es lumineux là-bas plus que les lumineux, d’après l’ordre d’Horus lui-même, le seigneur des générations – Ô cette huile d’Horus, ô cette huile de Seth ! Horus a offert son œil qu’il a enlevé à ses adversaires, Seth ne s’est point caché en lui, Horus s’en emplit, muni de ses formes divines ; l’œil d’Horus unit son parfum à toi. »

Thoth est parti à la recherche de l’œil d’Horus. Il le trouve, et le lui rapporte. Horus, remis en possession de son œil, peut le présenter à son père Osiris, et lui rendre son âme, restée cachée dans l’œil d’Horus.

Horus embrasse le Dieu Osiris et le couronne roi du Ciel.

Qu’est-ce que cela signifie ?

A la mort du Dieu Osiris, comme à la mort de tout autre dieu et de tout homme, l’âme s’enfuit et prend résidence dans l’œil solaire, l’œil d’Horus. Après les cérémonies et la momification, vient le moment de rendre l’âme au corps. Pour cela, il faut retrouver l’âme qui est dans l’œil envolé et la rendre à Horus.

La plupart du temps c’est Thoth qui est chargé de cette tâche. C’est au moment où Horus et Thoth embrassent le Dieu, que son âme lui est rendue.

Rien de tout cela n’est mécanique, automatique. On a affaire à des corps démembrés et en voie de décomposition avancée, ne l’oublions pas. Nous sommes aux limites du supportable. C’est dans cette puanteur, pourtant, que le divin se révèle. « Le Dieu vient, muni de ses membres qu’il avait cachés dans l’œil de son corps. Les résines du Dieu sortent de lui pour parfumer les humeurs sorties de ses chairs divines, les sécrétions tombées à terre. Tous les dieux lui ont donné ceci, que tu te livres parmi eux comme un maître de la crainte. »

L’odeur de ce corps, qui n’est plus en putréfaction, parce qu’il a été momifié, atteste de la divinité du processus, du miracle qui se déroule, de par le respect des rites.

Il faut revenir aux phénomènes les plus terre-à-terre du processus de la mort. Voici un cadavre ; s’en exhalent des humeurs, et en suintent des jus, des « résines ». Le génie égyptien voit là à l’œuvre une présence divine.

« Le parfum de la résine et la résine elle-même sont des dieux qui, confondus avec la divinité, résidaient aussi dans l’œil d’Horus. »

Dans la langue arabe, le mot « œil » est le même que le mot « source ». Dans la culture du désert, l’humeur vitrée que contient le globe oculaire est assimilée à une eau pure, une eau qui permet de voir. L’eau de l’œil est la source de la vision.

Ce qui importe aux anciens Égyptiens va bien au-delà de l’eau, de l’œil et de la vision. La « résine » exhalée par le mort, son parfum, l’onctuosité de ce « jus », de cette humeur, et son odeur, sont eux-mêmes des « dieux ». On en déduit que c’est l’action même de la transcendance divine qui est approchée par ces métaphores.

Le souffle, la respiration, l’odeur, la sécrétion, le parfum n’ont rien de visible. Nous sommes dans l’invisible, dans l’impalpable. L’œil ne voit pas le souffle, il voit pas l’invisible. Il ne voit pas ce qui est caché et encore moins ce qu’il cache.

« L’œil d’Horus te cachait dans ses larmes ».

Cette image transcende les époques, les âges, les civilisations, les religions.

« L’œil d’Horus te cachait dans ses larmes, et son parfum vient vers toi, Ammon-Râ, seigneur de Karnak, il s’élève vers toi parmi les Dieux. Parfum divin, deux fois bon, élève-toi comme un Dieu. »

La vision la plus sublime n’est qu’un bref avant-goût. Elle n’est pas la fin du voyage. Le goût des larmes cachent encore le Dieu. Bien plus loin, au-delà des images, au-delà de la saveur amère ou douce, s’élève en silence le parfum du Dieu. Et ce parfum de l’âme est encore un Dieu, qui annonce le Dieu caché, Ammon.

Jésus, un Osiris juif ?


Osiris est un Dieu, mort assassiné par son frère Seth, lequel le découpe ensuite en morceaux, qu’il répartit dans toute l’Égypte. Le papyrus Jumilhac dit que la tête était à Abydos, les mâchoires en Haute Égypte, les intestins à Pithom, les poumons à Béhemet du Delta, le phallus à Mendès, les deux jambes à Iakémet, les doigts dans les 13ème et 14ème nomes, un bras dans le 20ème nome et le cœur à Athribis du Delta.

Plutarque, qui raconte plus tardivement l’histoire d’Osiris donne une répartition complètement différente. Mais ce n’est pas un problème. Osiris, Dieu mort et ressuscité, est au cœur de la croyance des Égyptiens anciens en la résurrection des morts et en la vie éternelle.

Il s’agit d’un paradigme fondateur, dont on ne peut s’empêcher d’apprécier l’analogie avec la figure de Jésus Christ, Dieu crucifié et ressuscité.

Des papyrus précieux racontent la saga du Dieu Osiris, ses nombreuses péripéties. Meurtres, ruses, trahisons, transformations magiques abondent. Les lire aujourd’hui, dans une époque à la fois désenchantée et avide de passions religieuses dévoyées, peut se concevoir comme une sorte de plongée plusieurs millénaires en arrière, une plongée dans l’aube d’un sentiment naissant, qu’il serait vain de ne pas reconnaître comme profondément religieux, dans toutes les acceptions de ce terme ambigu.

Le papyrus Jumilhac, conservé à Paris, raconte un épisode intéressant, celui de la vengeance du fils d’Osiris, Anubis, qui s’est lancé à la poursuite de Seth, l’assassin de son père. Seth, se sachant menacé, prend la forme d’Anubis lui-même, pour tenter de brouiller les pistes, puis il est amené à prendre bien d’autres formes encore.

« Alors Imakhouemânkh marcha à la tête des dieux qui veillent sur Osiris ; il trouva Demib et lui coupa la tête, si bien qu’il fut oint de son [sang]. [Seth] vint à sa recherche, après s’être transformé en Anubis (…) Puis Isis dépeça Seth enfonçant ses dents dans son dos, et Thot prononça ses charmes contre lui. Rê dit alors : « Qu’on attribue ce siège au « Fatigué » ; comme il s’est régénéré ! Comme il est beau ! Et que Seth soit placé sous lui en qualité de siège. C’est juste, à cause du mal qu’il a fait à tous les membres d’Osiris. » (…) Mais Seth s’enfuit dans le désert et fit sa transformation en panthère de ce nome. Anubis, cependant, s’empara de lui, et Thot lut ses formules magiques contre lui, de nouveau. Aussi tomba-t-il à terre devant eux. Anubis le lia par les bras et les jambes et Seth fut consumé dans la flamme, de la tête aux pieds, dans tout son corps, à l’Est de la salle auguste. L’odeur de sa graisse ayant atteint le ciel, elle se répandit dans ce lieu magnifique, et Rê et les dieux la tinrent pour agréable. Puis Anubis fendit la peau de Seth, l’arracha et mit sa fourrure sur lui (…)

Seth fit sa transformation en Anubis afin que les portiers ne pussent pas le reconnaître (…) Anubis le poursuivit avec les dieux de sa suite, et le rejoignit. Mais Seth prenant l’aspect d’un taureau rendit sa forme méconnaissable. Anubis cependant le lia par les bras et les jambes, et lui coupa le phallus et les testicules (…)

Après quoi Anubis entra dans la Ouâbet pour vérifier l’état de son père, Osiris, et il le trouva sain et sauf, les chairs fermes et fraîches. Il se transforma en faucon, ouvrit ses ailes derrière son père Osiris, et derrière le vase qui contenait les humeurs de ce Dieu (…) il étendit les ailes en qualité de faucon pour voler grâce à elles, à la recherche de son propre œil, et il le rapporta intact à son maître. »

Seth se transforme sans cesse, en Anubis, puis en panthère, enfin en taureau. Mais Anubis l’emporte toujours, avec l’aide de Thot. Et alors Seth est à nouveau transformé par les dieux, en « siège » d’Osiris ou en « fourrure » d’Anubis. Mais c’est la transformation finale qui est agréable au Dieu suprême, Rê, lorsque Seth fut consumé en flammes, et en odeur de graisse, car alors il se répand dans le Ciel magnifique.

Il est intéressant de comparer la transformation finale de Seth en flammes et en odeur à celle d’Anubis qui prend la forme du faucon. Ce faucon, Horus, est l’une des divinités les plus anciennes, les plus archaïques du panthéon égyptien. Il représente, dans le cadre osirien, le fils posthume d’Osiris et d’Isis, qui vole au-dessus de son père mort, à la recherche de son œil, et contribue à lui rendre la vie.

Le papyrus Jumilhac évoque la légende d’Horus en son chapitre XXI, et le compare à une vigne. « Quant au vignoble, c’est le cadre qui entoure les deux yeux pour les protéger ; quant au raisin, c’est la pupille de l’œil d’Horus ; quant au vin qu’on en fait, ce sont les larmes d’Horus. » i

Pas de comparaison sans quelque raison, mais la métaphore du vin représentant les larmes du fils du Dieu Osiris, assimilé à une « vigne » font penser au vin, symbolisant le sang du Christ, lui aussi fils sacrifié du Dieu vivant.

iXIV,14,15, Trad. Jacques Vandier.

La crainte de l’Occident


L’Égypte ancienne fournit une manne d’idées stimulantes pour qui s’intéresse au fait religieux, dans son universalité.

La mort y est le moment clé, le moment où s’opère la transformation de l’âme du mort en l’âme ba, le principe divin de Rê.

Le Papyrus de Neferoubenef identifie aussi ce principe au « bélier divin de Mendès, ville où se fait l’union mystique des deux âmes de Rê et d’Osiris »i, selon Si Ratié, qui en a fait la traduction.

La religion de l’Égypte ancienne est une religion porteuse d’espoir pour tout un chacun. Il est donné à toute âme humaine la possibilité de réaliser au moment de la mort une mutation divine et royale, sous certaines conditions. L’âme a alors le pouvoir de se transformer en « Horus d’or », cet Horus dont la chair est d’or, et les os d’argent.

L’origine spirituelle de cette croyance remonte la nuit des temps. On a retrouvé des traces archéologiques de culte funéraire en Haute Égypte datant d’avant la première dynastie, aux alentours de 3500 av. J.-C.

Le Papyrus de Neferoubenef fait entendre la voix du fidèle se préparant à cette épreuve décisive.

« Salut à toi qui est dans la nécropole sainte de Rosetau; je te connais, je connais ton nom. Délivre-moi de ces serpents qui sont dans Rosetau, qui vivent de la chair des humains, qui avalent leur sang, car moi je les connais, je connais leurs noms. Que le premier ordre d’Osiris, Seigneur de l’Univers, mystérieux en ce qu’il fait, soit de me donner le souffle dans cette crainte qui est au milieu de l’Occident ; qu’il ne cesse d’ordonner les directives selon ce qui a existé, lui qui est mystérieux au sein des ténèbres. Que la gloire lui soit donnée dans Rosetau ! Maître de l’obscurité, qui descend et qui ordonne les nourritures dans l’Occident ! On entend sa voix, on ne le voit pas, le grand Dieu qui est dans Busiris ! (…)

Je viens en messager du Seigneur de l’Univers. Horus, son trône lui a été donné. Son père lui donne toutes louanges, ainsi que ceux qui sont dans la barque. Seigneur de crainte dans Nout et dans le Douat ! Je suis Horus. Je suis venu chargé de la sentence. Permets que j’entre, que je dise ce que j’ai vu. »ii

A lire ces antiques paroles, on est frappé de certains échos repris plus tard par des religions subséquentes, comme la juive ou la chrétienne :

« On entend sa voix, on ne le voit pas, le grand Dieu. »

« Je viens en messager du Seigneur de l’Univers. Horus, son trône lui a été donné. Son père lui donne toutes louanges, ainsi que ceux qui sont dans la barque. »

Il y a aussi cette formule plus étrange encore qu’elle n’est prophétique: « Cette crainte qui est au milieu de l’Occident ».

L’Occident a toujours été pour les Sémites, la langue arabe en témoigne, le lieu du danger et de l’exil. Pour les anciens Égyptiens c’était aussi le lieu associé à la mort, et partant, à la résurrection.

La mémoire collective, profonde, incarnée dans les gènes depuis des millénaires, a sans doute cultivé cette crainte, qui existe encore sous forme larvée, inconsciente. Elle coïncide aujourd’hui avec un fait géopolitique majeur.

L’Occident est toujours associé pour le meilleur et pour le pire à l’exil.

Les migrations de populations du Sud et de l’Orient fuyant la guerre, la famine ou la pauvreté, ne sont pas près de s’arrêter.

En réaction, l’actualité en témoigne, l’Occident se sent menacé, et entre dans la « crainte ».

Dans ce contexte, pourquoi revisiter l’ancien mythe de l’Horus d’or, et la révélation du grand Dieu qui est dans Busiris ?

Parce que la mémoire plusieurs fois millénaire de «la crainte qui est au milieu de l’Occident » devrait inciter, me semble-t-il, à prendre un peu de distance avec l’actualité immédiate (et avec les effets désespérants et dévastateurs du terrorisme).

L’Occident est vu depuis longtemps comme le « pays de la mort » mais aussi comme le lieu de la résurrection, selon la plus ancienne religion de l’Orient.

Entendons la leçon, s’il y a encore des oreilles pour entendre.

Il faut diminuer la misère du monde, quoi qu’il en coûte, et non l’augmenter.

Le prix à payer pour l’inaction sera terrible.

Plus terrible encore le prix à payer pour la haine, l’isolationnisme, le racisme, l’égoïsme de masse.

Plus terrible encore à l’avenir, sera la crainte éprouvée par l’Occident.

i Si Ratié, Le Papyrus de Naferoubenef, 1968

iiIbid.