Check Maat


Maat

In Egypt, two Coptic churches suffered suicide attacks during Palm Sunday in April 2017. This Christian feast, a week before Easter, recalls the day when Jesus, riding on a donkey, entered Jerusalem, welcomed by jubilant inhabitants, brandishing branches and palms as a sign of enthusiasm. Jesus was arrested shortly afterwards and crucified.

Jihadists came to Tanta and Alexandria. They blew themselves up in the midst of the crowd of the faithful. The globalized jihad preferably chooses weak targets, and seeks to provoke hatred and rage, to inflame resentment between peoples, to set religions against each other.

The policies of Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, who had just been re-elected, undoubtedly had something to do with Daech’s radicalisation in that country. But many other, more distant, deeper causes contributed to this umpteenth attack.

The New York Times wrote an ambiguous and somewhat hypocritical editorial after the attack, an excerpt of which reads as follows: « The struggle against terrorism is not a ‘war’ that can be won if only the right strategy is found. It is an ongoing struggle against enormously complex and shifting forces that feed on despair, resentment and hatred, and have the means in a connected world to spread their venom far and wide.”i

For the columnist of the New York Times, « jihad » is not a « war » that could be won, for example, with a « good strategy ». It is not a « war », it is a continuous « struggle » against forces of « enormous complexity » that are constantly shifting and feeding on « despair, resentment and hatred ».

Not a word in the article, however, to attempt to shed light on this ‘complexity’ or to delve deeper into the origin of this ‘despair’, ‘resentment’ and ‘hatred’. The New York Times merely warns readers not to give in to despair, panic or hatred themselves. Not a word about the policies of the Western powers in this part of the world for more than a century. Not a word about the responsibility of countries like England or France for sharing the spoils of the Ottoman Empire after the First World War.

Not a word about decolonization, after the Second World War, or the consequences of the Cold War. The self-serving involvement of powers such as the United States and the USSR is not analyzed.

Nor, of course, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The collapse of Libya, facilitated by a coalition of Western countries, does not lend itself to any analysis either.

The New York Times cannot give a history lesson, and recapitulate all the woes of the world in each of its editorials. But the focus of this particular article on the « despair », « hatred » and « resentment » of the jihadists deserves at least the beginnings of an explanation.

Writing about these subjects is difficult, but it is not « extraordinarily complex ». Even a Donald Trump, in the midst of an election campaign, and with known success, was able to address some aspects of it through tweets, and to point to the direct responsibility of the Bushes, father and son, in this never-ending « fight ».

The White House spokesman had to apologize publicly for stating that even Hitler did not use chemical weapons during the Second World War. This statement, both fanciful and outrageous, was supposed to underline the seriousness of Assad’s crimes and to justify an increase in the bombing of Syria by the United States, increasing the general confusion and making it even more difficult to perceive a possible political outcome in that part of the world.

In a few centuries, perhaps, the distant descendants of the Western voters in whose name these policies were implemented will analyze the responsibilities and judge the strategies deployed in the Middle East throughout the last century, after the launch of the « Great Game » deployed for the greater good of the British Empire.

Today, this Empire is no more. The few crumbs that remain, like Gibraltar, could prove embarrassing to the British ultra-nationalists who dream of Brexit, and who are trying to regain the glory of yesteryear in splendid independence.

Let us try a little utopia. Tomorrow, or in a few centuries’ time, people may decide to put an end to the « long » history and its heavy consequences. All we have to do is look back to the depths of the past, to see the layering of plans, the differentiation of ages. Tomorrow, the entire modern era will be nothing more than an outdated and abolished moment of a bygone past, and an exorbitant testimony to the folly of mankind.

Islam has only thirteen centuries of existence, Christianity twenty centuries and Mosaic Judaism about thirty-two centuries.

Egypt, by contrast, is not lacking in memory. From the top of the pyramids, well over forty centuries contemplate the suburbs of Cairo. Two thousand years before the appearance of Judaism, Ancient Egypt already possessed a very elaborate religion, in which the essential question was not that of « monotheism » and « polytheism », but rather the profound dialectic of the One (the Creator, the original God), and the Multiple (the myriad of His manifestations, of His names).

In the Texts of the sarcophagi, which are among the oldest written texts of humanity, we read that the Creator God declared: « I have not commanded (humanity) to do evil (jzft); their hearts have disobeyed my words.”ii

The Egyptologist Erik Hornung gives this interpretation: Human beings are responsible for this evil. They are also responsible for their birth, and for the darkness that allows evil to enter their hearts.

The gods of Egypt can be terrifying, unpredictable, but unlike men, they do not want evil. Even Set, the murderer of Osiris, was not the symbol of absolute evil, but only the necessary executor of the world order.

« The battle, the constant confrontation, the confusion, and the questioning of the established order, actions in which Set engaged, are necessary characteristics of the existing world and of the limited disorder that is essential to a living order. Gods and men must, however, see to it that disorder never comes to overthrow justice and order; this is the meaning of their common obligation towards Maatiii

The concept of Maat in ancient Egypt represents the order of the world, the right measure of things. It is the initial and final harmony, the fundamental state willed by the Creator God. « Like the wounded and perpetually healed ‘eye of Horus’, Maat symbolizes this primary state of the world.”iv

The Egyptians considered Maat to be a substance that makes the whole world « live », that makes the living and the dead, gods and men « live ». The Texts of the Sarcophagi say that the gods « live on Maat« .

The idea of Maat is symbolized by a seated goddess wearing the hieroglyph of an ostrich feather on her head. Pharaoh Ramses II is represented offering this symbolic image of Maat to the God Ptah.

Maat‘s offering has a strong charge of meaning. What the God Ptah wants is to be known in the hearts of men, because it is there that the divine work of creation can acquire its true meaning.

Maat emanated from the Creator God at the time of creation. But it is through men that Maat must return to God. In the Egyptian religion, Maat represents the original « link » or « covenant » between God and man. It is this « link », this « covenant », that must be made to live with Maat.

If men turn away from this « covenant », if men remain silent, if they show indifference towards Maat, then they fall into the « non-existent », – according to the ancient Egyptian religion. This silence, this indifference, only testifies to their nothingness.

The Coptic bodies horribly torn apart by the explosions in Alexandria and Tanta are like the dismembered body of Osiris.

By the strength of her spirit, by the power of her « magic », Isis allowed the resurrection of Osiris. Similarly, the Palms announce Easter and the resurrection of God.

What could be the current global metaphor that would be equivalent to the « resurrection » of Osiris or the « resurrection » celebrated at Easter?

What current word could fill the absence of meaning, the abysmal absurdity, the violence of hatred, in this world?

Egyptian blood flowed again in the Nile Delta, and bodies were violently dismembered.

Where is the Isis who will come to resurrect them?

Where is hiding the Spirit of Maat?

iNew York Times, April 12th, 2017

iiErik Hornung. Les Dieux de l’Égypte. 1971

iiiIbid.

ivIbid.

L’Esprit, la Vérité et la Justice – de l’Égypte à l’Inde


L’islam a treize siècles d’existence. Le christianisme est né il y a vingt siècles. Le judaïsme mosaïque est apparu il y a environ trois mille ans. L’origine de la religion du Véda remonte à plus de quatre mille deux cent ans. Il y a cinquante cinq siècles, soit plus de deux mille ans avant l’apparition du judaïsme, la religion de l’Égypte pré-dynastique vénérait déjà un Dieu unique, créateur, ainsi que les myriades de ses manifestations divines, la multitude de ses Noms. Elle célébrait la divinité, en tant qu’Une et Multiple, à la fois.

Des chercheurs ont consacré leur vie à l’étude de la représentation du divin telle qu’elle se laisse percevoir à travers les textes égyptiens les plus originels, et ils sont arrivés à des conclusions ébouriffantes. Par exemple, il semble qu’il faille renoncer à l’opposition, toute artificielle, entre « monothéisme » et « polythéisme », qui n’est vraiment pas applicable à l’Égypte ancienne, laquelle conjugue les deux systèmes sans contradictions.

En 1857, dans un Mémoire adressé à l’Académie, Emmanuel de Rougé a compilé les principales qualifications du Dieu suprême qu’il a trouvées dans les textes égyptiens les plus anciens. Elles sont indubitablement monothéistes : « Dieu UN, vivant en vérité, qui a fait les choses qui sont, a créé les choses existantes. – Générateur, existant SEUL, qui a fait le ciel, créé la terre. – SEULE substance éternelle, CRÉATEUR qui a engendré les dieux. – UNIQUE générateur dans le ciel et sur la terre, non engendré. – Dieu qui s’engendre lui-même. »i

En 1851, il avait déjà noté que « Neith, la grande Mère génératrice d’un Dieu, qui est un premier-né, et qui n’est pas engendré, mais enfanté, sans génération paternelle ou masculine. Ce Dieu est appelé le ‘Seigneur des siècles’. C’est le seul Dieu vivant en vérité… Le générateur des autres dieux… Celui qui s’engendre lui-même… Celui qui existe dans le commencement… ‘Les dieux de la demeure céleste n’ont point eux-mêmes engendré leurs membres, c’est Toi qui les a enfantés dans leur ensemble’ »ii

Dans sa Conférence sur la religion des anciens Égyptiens, Emmanuel de Rougé synthétise tout ce qu’il a appris après avoir exploré les textes sacrés, les hymnes et les prières funéraires les plus anciennes.

« Aujourd’hui, [ces textes] sont devenus classiques et personne n’a contredit le sens fondamental des principaux passages à l’aide desquels nous pouvons établir ce que l’Égypte antique a enseigné sur Dieu, sur le monde et sur l’homme. J’ai dit Dieu et non les dieux. Premier caractère ; c’est l’unité la plus énergiquement exprimée : Dieu un, seul, unique, pas d’autres avec lui. – Il est le seul être vivant en vérité. – Tu es un, et des millions d’êtres sortent de toi. – Il a tout fait et seul il n’a pas été fait. Notion la plus claire, la plus simple, la plus précise. Mais comment concilier l’unité de Dieu avec le polythéisme égyptien ? Peut-être l’histoire et la géographie éclaireront-elles la question. La religion égyptienne comprend une quantité de cultes locaux. L’Égypte, que Ménès réunit tout entière sous son sceptre, était divisée en nomes ayant chacun une ville capitale : chacune de ces régions avait son Dieu principal désigné par un nom spécial, mais c’est toujours la même doctrine qui revient sous des noms différents. Une idée y domine : celle d’un Dieu un et primordial : c’est toujours et partout une substance qui existe par elle-même et un Dieu inaccessible. (…) Toujours à Thèbes on adorera Ammon, dieu caché, père des dieux et des hommes, avec Ammon-Ra (dieu soleil), première forme où apparaît la matérialisation de l’idée divine. »iii

Pour quiconque est un peu familiarisé avec les concepts chrétiens, il est pour le moins extraordinaire de découvrir que les Égyptiens réfléchissaient, plus de trois mille ans av. J.-C., à des questions théologiques traitant de Dieu le Père et de Dieu le Fils, que E. de Rougé résume de la façon suivante:

« Dieu existe par lui-même, c’est le seul être qui n’ait pas été engendré. [Les Égyptiens] conçoivent Dieu comme la cause active, la source perpétuelle de sa propre existence ; il s’engendre lui-même perpétuellement. Dieu se faisant Dieu et s’engendrant perpétuellement lui-même, de là l’idée d’avoir considéré Dieu sous deux faces : le père et le fils. (…) Jamblique nous disait bien que le Dieu des Égyptiens était Πρῶτος τού πρωτοῦ, « Premier de premier ». Un hymne du musée de Leyde dit plus encore : il l’appelle le Un de un, pour attester l’Unité qui persiste malgré la notion de génération, d’où résultait une dualité apparente. »iv

La représentation du Dieu Un sous forme ‘trinitaire’ est aussi évoquée dans les anciens textes égyptiens. A Hiéropolis, E. de Rougé voit la même figure divine prendre trois formes différentes, celle du Dieu inaccessible, Atoum, celle du Père divin, Choper, représenté par l’image du dieu-scarabée, s’engendrant lui-même, et le Dieu Ra, qui en est la manifestation visible, solaire.

S’appuyant sur les idées de E. de Rougé et sur ses propres recherches, Peter le Page Renouf écrit un peu plus tard: « Dans l’ensemble de la littérature égyptienne (ancienne), nuls faits ne paraissent mieux établis que les deux points suivants : 1° la doctrine du Dieu unique et celle des dieux multiples étaient enseignées par les mêmes hommes ; 2° on ne percevait aucune incohérence entre ces deux doctrines. Il va de soi que rien n’aurait été plus absurde si les Égyptiens avaient attaché la même signification que nous au mot Dieu. Mais il existait peut-être un sens du mot qui permettait son usage tant pour la multitude que pour l’unique. Nous ne pouvons mieux faire pour commencer que de nous efforcer de préciser la signification exacte qu’avait pour les Égyptiens le mot nutar (nr)v que nous traduisons par ‘dieu’ »vi.

Plus récemment, analysant les Textes des sarcophages, qui sont parmi les plus anciens documents écrits de l’humanité, l’égyptologue Erik Hornung montre qu’on y voit mis en scène le Dieu créateur, lequel déclare : « Je n’ai pas ordonné que (l’humanité) fasse le mal (jzft) ; leurs cœurs ont désobéi à mes propos. »vii Une interprétation immédiate en découle: ce sont les êtres humains qui sont responsables du mal, non les Dieux. Leur naissance dans l’obscurité a permis au mal de s’insérer dans leurs cœurs.

Les Dieux de l’Égypte peuvent se montrer terrifiants, imprévisibles, mais contrairement aux hommes, ils ne font pas le mal, ils ne sont pas le Mal. Même Seth, le meurtrier d’Osiris, n’est pas un Dieu du Mal, il n’incarne pas le Mal absolu. Seth joue seulement sa partition dans l’ordre du monde vivant, et il contribue par ses actions à soutenir cet ordre du monde. « La bataille, la confrontation constante, la confusion, et la remise en question de l’ordre établi, actions dans lesquelles s’engagea Seth, sont des caractéristiques nécessaires du monde existant et du désordre limité qui est essentiel à un ordre vivant. Les dieux et les hommes doivent cependant veiller à ce que le désordre n’en arrive jamais à renverser la justice et l’ordre ; telle est la signification de leur obligation commune à l’égard de maât. »viii

Le concept de maât dans l’Égypte ancienne est d’une très grande importance et d’une grande complexité. Erik Hornung explique: « maât est l’ordre, la juste mesure des choses, qui sous-tend le monde ; c’est l’état parfait vers lequel nous devons tendre et qui est en harmonie avec les intentions du Dieu créateur (…) Tel l’ « œil d’Horus » blessé et perpétuellement soigné, maât symbolise cet état premier du monde. »ix

Maât, cette idée fondamentale d’un ordre du monde, d’une juste mesure à l’échelle universelle, évoque irrésistiblement, me semble-t-il, l’idée de ṛta dans le Véda et celle d’arta dans l’Avesta.

Dans le Véda, ṛta (ऋत ) signifie « loi divine, ordre cosmique » ou encore « vérité suprême ».

Dans l’Avesta, et en particulier dans les Gâthâs, on trouve le même concept sous un nom presque identique : arta.

« ta est le Kosmos, c’est l’ordre éternel de la nature et l’ordre établi par le culte des dieux et dans le sacrifice, parce que le culte pratiqué selon les prescriptions rituelles est un élément de première importance dans l’ordre universel ; c’est enfin la bonne conduite dictée par les bons sentiments, et le bon ordre moral, la vérité, le droit. »x

Selon Jacques Duchesne-Guillemin, l’ancienneté de la notion de ṛta est attestée par la présence de ce terme dans des noms propres de chefs aryens en Mitanni, en Syrie et en Palestine, connus dès 1400 av. J.-C., par l’intermédiaire des tablettes d’El Amarna, ainsi que dans des noms propres de l’Iran historique. Chez les Mèdes des textes cunéiformes parlent d’un Artasari et d’un Artasiraru. En Perse, Artaxerxès s’appelait plus exactement Arta-Khshathra.

La notion de ṛta a une triple valeur de sens: l’« ordre naturel », l’« ordre rituel », et la « vérité ».

Dans le Ṛg Veda et dans les Gâthâs, le ṛta s’applique au retour des saisons, à la succession des jours, aux déplacements réguliers des corps célestes :

« Qui a été, à l’origine, le père premier d’Arta ? Qui a assigné leur chemin au soleil et aux étoiles ? »xi

Mais le ṛta est aussi associé aux rites du Sacrifice :

« Quiconque, ô Agni, honore avec vénération ton sacrifice, celui-là garde le ta. »xii.

Le troisième sens de ṛta, « vérité », est sans doute le plus fondamental et le plus abstrait. « Dire le ta », tam vad, c’est « dire la vérité ». « Aller au ta », tam i, c’est « aller à la vérité » c’est-à-dire « faire le bien ».

Duchesne-Guillemin note à ce propos : « La religion indo-iranienne se rencontre ici avec l’Ancien Testament, en particulier avec les Psaumes, qui parlent du ‘chemin de la Justice’xiii. L’image devait se présenter naturellement. Elle figure aussi en Égypte, chez Pétosiris. »xiv

L’image est si ‘naturelle’, si ‘universelle’, qu’elle figure aussi, et c’est essentiel de le noter, dans le Nouveau Testament, – seulement enrichie d’un troisième terme, celui de ‘vie’ : « Je suis la Voie, la Vérité et la Vie »xv.

L’idée sous-jacente, étonnamment précoce et féconde au regard des cinquante-cinq siècles qui devaient suivre, est que la bonne conduite de l’homme, suivant la ‘voie de la vérité’, renforce l’ordre cosmique, universel, et in fine, l’ordre divin.

Les Dieux comme les hommes doivent ‘garder le ta’. Mitra et Varuna « gardent le ta par le ta »xvi  dit le Ṛg Veda à plusieurs reprises.

Un traducteur allemand utilise, pour rendre ta dans ce verset, le mot Gesetz, « loi ».

Un autre traducteur, persan et zoroastrien, rend le mot avestique arta par « justesse ». Mais dans les Gâthâs le mot arta n’est plus simplement un concept abstrait, c’est une personne divine, à laquelle le Dieu suprême (Ahura) s’adresse et auprès de qui il prend conseil :

« Ahura demande conseil à la Justesse : « Connais-tu un sauveur capable de mener la terre opprimée vers le bonheur ? »xvii

La ‘Justesse’ est souvent associée à une autre abstraction personnalisée, la ‘Sagesse’ :

« Que mon admiration s’adresse à Ahura et à la Pensée juste, ainsi qu’à la Sagesse et à la Justesse. »xviii

Le mot ta (ou Arta) est donc riche d’une vaste palette de sens : ordre, rite, vérité, loi, justesse.

Il me paraît que ce mot, appartenant à la civilisation indo-aryenne (védique, avestique, indo-iranienne), peut donc fort bien soutenir la comparaison avec le maât de l’Égypte antique.

Les Égyptiens considéraient que le maât était une substance par laquelle vivait le monde entier, les vivants et les morts, les dieux et les hommes. Dans les Textes des Sarcophages on trouve cette expression : les dieux « vivent sur maât »xix.

Concept abstrait, le maât disposait aussi d’une représentation symbolique, sous la forme d’une déesse assise portant sur la tête le hiéroglyphe d’une plume d’autruche. Le pharaon Ramsès II est représenté offrant cette image de maât au Dieu Ptah.

L’offrande de maât a une forte charge de sens, même si les dieux n’ont pas besoin des dons des hommes. Ce que les dieux veulent c’est être ressentis dans le cœur des hommes, car c’est ainsi que leur œuvre de création peut acquérir sa véritable signification.

Le maât émane du Dieu créateur lors de la création, et c’est par l’intermédiaire des hommes que maât peut et doit revenir à la divinité. C’est ainsi que maât représente, dans la religion égyptienne, l’association, ou « l’alliance » originaire de Dieu et de l’homme.xx

Le maât : une « Alliance entre Dieu et l’homme » , inventée sur les bords du Nil, il y a plus de cinq mille ans? Sans doute, le mot, et le concept, apparaissent chargés de résonances…

Franchissons un nouveau pas.

La symbolique la plus profonde de l’Égypte ancienne rejoint, on le voit, les croyances védiques, avestiques et gâthiques, et elle préfigure, on le pressent, les croyances juives et chrétiennes.

Maât, ta, Arta, sont, on peut le concevoir, des sortes de préfigurations (avec un ou deux millénaires d’avance) de la « Loi » et de l’« Alliance » que Moïse rapporta à son peuple du sommet de la montagne.

Aujourd’hui encore, pour des raisons auxquelles contribuent des croyances diverses et variées au sujet du Dieu Un, des flots de sang coulent des bords du Nil à ceux de l’Euphrate, et du bassin de l’Oxus (l’Amou-Daria) à celui du Gange.

Aujourd’hui, plus que jamais, il est temps de revenir à ce que les sages et les génies anciens d’Égypte, de Chaldée, d’Assur, d’Elam, de Trans-Oxiane, de Perse et d’Inde surent discerner, il y a de nombreux millénaires : l’Esprit de Maât, la Vérité de ta, la Justice d’Arta.

iCité par A. Bonnetty in Annales de philosophie chrétienne, t. XV, p.112 (4ème série). Bibliothèque égyptologique contenant les œuvres des égyptologues français, Tome XXVI. Emmanuel de Rougé. Œuvres diverses, publiées sous la direction de G. Maspéro et Ed. Naville. 1907-1918. Tome sixième, p. 226-227

iiEmmanuel de Rougé. Mémoire sur la Statuette naophore du Musée grégorien du Vatican. Œuvres diverses, t. II, pp.364, 358, 366

iiiEmmanuel de Rougé. Œuvres diverses, publiées sous la direction de G. Maspéro et Ed. Naville. Bibliothèque égyptologique contenant les œuvres des égyptologues français, Tome XXVI. 1907-1918. Tome sixième, p.232

ivIbid. p. 232

vErik Hornung note que les égyptologues contemporains donnent aujourd’hui la prononciation ‘netjer’ pour le hiéroglyphe nr.

viPeter le Page Renouf. Lectures on the Origin and Growth of Religion as Illustrated by the Religion of Ancient Egypt delivered in May and June 1879. London, Williams and Norgate, 2nd Edition, 1884, p. 94

viiErik Hornung. Der Eine und die Vielen. 1971. Trad. Paul Couturiau. Les Dieux de l’Égypte. L’Un et le multiple. Flammarion 1992, p195

viiiIbid. p.195

ixIbid. p.195

xArthur Christensen, Acta Orientalia, article cité par G. Dumézil, Naissances d’archanges, p.317, et également cité par Jacques Duchesne-Guillemin, Zoroastre, Robert Laffont, 1975, p. 57

xiYasna 44, 3 sq. Cité par J. Duchesne-Guillemin, op.cit. p. 58

xii Ṛg Veda V,12, 6

xiiiPs. 85,14. צֶדֶק, לְפָנָיו יְהַלֵּךְ; וְיָשֵׂם לְדֶרֶךְ פְּעָמָיו. « La justice marche au-devant de lui, et trace la route devant ses pas ».

xivJacques Duchesne-Guillemin, Zoroastre, Robert Laffont, 1975, p. 59, n.1.

xvJn, 14, 6

xviṚg Veda V, 62, 1 et 68, 4

xviiLes Gâthâs. Yasna hat 29. Trad. Khosro Khazaï Pardis. Albin Michel, 2011, p.122

xviiiLes Gâthâs. Yasna hat 30. Trad. Khosro Khazaï Pardis. Albin Michel, 2011, p.127

xixErik Hornung. Der Eine und die Vielen. 1971. Trad. Paul Couturiau. Les Dieux de l’Égypte. L’Un et le multiple. Flammarion 1992, p.195

xx Erik Hornung. Der Eine und die Vielen. 1971. Trad. Paul Couturiau. Les Dieux de l’Égypte. L’Un et le multiple. Flammarion 1992, p.196

Échec à Maât


Il y a un an déjà, dans l’Égypte de Sissi, deux églises coptes ont subi des attaques-suicides, pendant le dimanche des Rameaux, au mois d’avril 2017. Cette fête chrétienne, une semaine avant Pâques, rappelle le jour où Jésus, monté sur un âne, fit son entrée à Jérusalem, accueilli par des habitants en liesse, brandissant des rameaux et des palmes en signe d’enthousiasme. Jésus fut arrêté peu après, et crucifié.

Les djihadistes sont venus à Tanta et à Alexandrie. Ils se sont fait exploser au milieu de la foule des fidèles. Le djihad mondialisé choisit de préférence des cibles faibles, et cherche à provoquer la haine et la rage, à envenimer le ressentiment entre les peuples, à dresser les religions les unes contre les autres.

La politique du président égyptien Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, qui vient d’être réélu, est sans doute pour quelque chose dans la radicalisation de Daech dans ce pays. Mais beaucoup d’autres causes, plus lointaines, plus profondes, ont contribué à ce énième attentat.

Le New York Timesi a écrit après l’attentat un éditorial ambigu et quelque peu hypocrite, dont voici un extrait : « The struggle against terrorism is not a « war » that can be won if only the right strategy is found. It is an ongoing struggle against enormously complex and shifting forces that feed on despair, resentment and hatred, and have the means in a connected world to spread their venom far and wide. »

Pour les éditorialistes du New York Times, le « djihad » n’est pas une « guerre» qui pourrait être gagnée, par exemple grâce à une « bonne stratégie ». Ce n’est pas une « guerre », c’est un « combat » continuel, contre des forces d’une « énorme complexité », qui se déplacent sans cesse, et se nourrissent du « désespoir, du ressentiment et de la haine ».

Pas un mot cependant dans l’article pour tenter d’éclairer cette « complexité » ou pour approfondir l’origine de ce « désespoir », de ce « ressentiment » et de cette « haine ». Le New York Times se contente de recommander au lecteur de ne pas céder lui-même au désespoir, à la panique ou à la haine. Pas un mot sur la politique des puissances occidentales dans cette région du monde depuis plus d’un siècle. Pas un mot sur la responsabilité qui incombe à des pays comme l’Angleterre ou comme la France, pour s’être partagé les dépouilles de l’Empire Ottoman après la 1ère guerre mondiale.

Pas un mot sur la décolonisation, après la 2ème guerre mondiale, ou les conséquences de la guerre froide. L’implication intéressée de puissances comme les États-Unis et l’URSS n’est pas analysée.

Ni bien sûr le conflit israélo-palestinien. L’effondrement de la Libye facilité par une coalition de pays occidentaux, et prôné par un président français aujourd’hui accusé de corruption, ne prête pas non plus à quelque analyse.

Le New York Times ne peut pas faire un cours d’histoire, et récapituler tous les malheurs du monde dans chacun de ses éditoriaux. Mais la focalisation de cet article particulier sur le « désespoir », la « haine » et le « ressentiment » des djihadistes mériterait au moins un début d’explication.

Écrire sur ces sujets est difficile, mais ce n’est pas « extraordinairement complexe ». Même un Donald Trump, en pleine campagne électorale, et avec le succès que l’on sait, a été capable d’en traiter certains aspects à coup de tweets, et de désigner la responsabilité directe des Bush, père et fils, dans ce « combat » sans fin.

Le porte-parole de la Maison Blanche a dû s’excuser publiquement pour avoir affirmé que même Hitler n’avait pas utilisé d’armes chimiques pendant la 2ème guerre mondiale. Cette affirmation, à la fois fantaisiste et scandaleuse, était censée permettre de souligner la gravité des crimes d’Assad, et de justifier une aggravation des bombardements en Syrie, par les États-Unis, accentuant la confusion générale, et rendant plus difficile encore la perception d’une possible issue politique das cette partie du monde.

Dans quelques siècles, peut-être, les lointains descendants des électeurs occidentaux au nom desquels ces politiques ont été mises en œuvre, analyseront les responsabilités et jugeront les stratégies déployées au Moyen Orient tout au long du dernier siècle, après le lancement du « Grand jeu » (Great Game) déployé pour le plus grand bien de l’Empire britannique.

Aujourd’hui, l’Empire est mort. Les quelques miettes qui en restent, comme Gibraltar, pourraient se révéler gênantes pour les ultranationalistes britanniques qui rêvent de Brexit, et qui tentent de renouer avec la gloire de jadis, dans une splendide indépendance.

Essayons un peu d’utopie. Demain, ou dans quelques siècles, les peuples pourraient décider d’en finir avec l’Histoire « longue », et ses lourdes conséquences. Il suffit de se retourner vers les profondeurs du passé, pour voir s’étager les plans, se différencier les âges. Demain, l’époque moderne tout entière ne sera plus qu’un moment, démodé et aboli, d’un passé révolu, et un témoignage exorbitant de la folie des hommes.

L’islam n’a que treize siècles d’existence, le christianisme vingt siècles et le judaïsme mosaïque environ trente deux siècles.

L’Égypte, par contraste, ne manque pas de mémoire. Du haut des pyramides, bien plus de quarante siècles contemplent les banlieues du Caire. Deux mille ans avant l’apparition du judaïsme, l’Égypte ancienne possédait déjà une religion fort élaborée, dans laquelle la question essentielle n’était pas celle du « monothéisme » et du « polythéisme », mais plutôt la dialectique profonde de l’Un (le Dieu créateur, originaire), et du Multiple (la myriade de Ses manifestations, de Ses noms).

Dans les Textes des sarcophages, qui font partie des plus anciens textes écrits de l’humanité, on lit que le Dieu créateur a déclaré : « Je n’ai pas ordonné que (l’humanité) fasse le mal (jzft) ; leurs cœurs ont désobéi à mes propos. »ii

L’égyptologue Erik Hornung en donne cette interprétation: les êtres humains sont responsables de ce mal. Ils sont aussi responsables de leur naissance, et de l’obscurité qui permet au mal de s’insérer dans leurs cœurs.

Les Dieux de l’Égypte peuvent se montrer terrifiants, imprévisibles, mais contrairement aux hommes, ils ne veulent pas le Mal. Même Seth, le meurtrier d’Osiris, n’était pas le symbole du Mal absolu, mais seulement l’exécutant nécessaire au développement de l’ordre du monde.

« La bataille, la confrontation constante, la confusion, et la remise en question de l’ordre établi, actions dans lesquelles s’engagea Seth, sont des caractéristiques nécessaires du monde existant et du désordre limité qui est essentiel à un ordre vivant. Les dieux et les hommes doivent cependant veiller à ce que le désordre n’en arrive jamais à renverser la justice et l’ordre ; telle est la signification de leur obligation commune à l’égard de maât. »iii

Le concept de Maât dans l’Égypte ancienne représente l’ordre du monde, la juste mesure des choses. C’est l’harmonie initiale et finale, l’état fondamental voulu par le Dieu créateur. « Tel l’« œil d’Horus » blessé et perpétuellement soigné, Maât symbolise cet état premier du monde. »iv

Les Égyptiens considéraient que le Maât était une substance qui fait « vivre » le monde entier, qui fait « vivre » les vivants et les morts, les dieux et les hommes. Les Textes des Sarcophages disent que les dieux « vivent sur Maât».

L’idée du Maât est symbolisée par une déesse assisen portant sur la tête le hiéroglyphe d’une plume d’autruche. Le pharaon Ramsès II est représenté offrant cette image symbolique de Maât au Dieu Ptah.

L’offrande de Maât a une forte charge de sens. Ce que le Dieu Ptah veut c’est être connu dans le cœur des hommes, car c’est là que l’œuvre divine de création peut acquérir sa véritable signification.

Maât a émané du Dieu créateur lors de la création. Mais c’est par l’intermédiaire des hommes que Maât doit revenir à Dieu. Maât représente donc, dans la religion égyptienne, le « lien » ou « l’alliance » originaire, entre Dieu et l’homme. C’est ce « lien », cette « alliance », qu’il faut faire vivre avec Maât.

Si les hommes se détournent de cette « alliance », si les hommes gardent le silence, s’ils font preuve d’indifférence à l’égard de Maât, alors ils tombent dans le « non-existant », –selon l’ancienne religion égyptienne. Ce silence, cette indifférence, témoignent seulement de leur néant.

Les corps coptes horriblement déchiquetés par les explosions à Alexandrie et Tanta sont à l’image du corps démembré d’Osiris. Par la force de son esprit, par la puissance de sa « magie », Isis permit la résurrection d’Osiris. De façon analogue, les Rameaux annoncent Pâques et la résurrection du Dieu.

Quelle pourrait être la métaphore mondiale, actuelle, qui serait l’équivalent de la « résurrection » d’Osiris ou de la « résurrection » de Pâques?

Quelle parole actuelle pourrait-elle combler l’absence de sens, l’abyssale absurdité, la violence de la haine, dans le monde ?

Du sang égyptien coule à nouveau dans le Delta du Nil, des corps y sont violemment démembrés.

Où est l’Isis qui viendra les ressusciter ?

Où est l’Esprit de Maât ?

iÉdition du 12 avril 2017

iiErik Hornung. Les Dieux de l’Égypte. 1971

iiiIbid.

ivIbid.