A Philosophy of Hatred


Quite early in history, the idea of a « universal religion » appeared in various civilisations – despite the usual obstacles posed by tradition and the vested interests of priests and princes.

This idea did not fit easily into the old frames of thought, nor into the representations of the world built by tribal, national religions, or, a fortiori, by exclusive, elitist sects, reserved for privileged initiates or a chosen few.

But, for example, five centuries before the Prophet Muhammad, the Persian prophet Mani already affirmed out of the blues that he was the « seal of the prophets ». It was therefore up to him to found and preach a new, universal religion. Manichaeism then had its hour of glory. Augustine, who embraced it for a time, testifies to its expansion and success in the territories controlled by Rome at the time, and to its lasting hold on the spirits.

Manichaeism promoted a dualist system of thought, centred on the eternal struggle between Good and Evil; it is not certain that these ideas have disappeared today.

Before Mani, the first Christians also saw themselves as bearers of a really universal message. They no longer saw themselves as Jews — or Gentiles. They thought of themselves as a third kind of man (« triton genos« , « tertium genus« ), « trans-humans » ahead of the times. They saw themselves as the promoters of a new wisdom, « barbaric » from the Greek point of view, « scandalous » for the Jews, – transcending the power of the Law and of Reason.

Christians were not to be a nation among nations, but « a nation built out of nations » according to the formula of Aphrahat, a Persian sage of the 4th century.

Contrary to the usual dichotomies, that of the Greeks against the Barbarians, or that of the Jews against the Goyim, the Christians thus thought that they embodied a new type of « nation », a « nation » that was not « national », but purely spiritual, a « nation » that would be like a soul in the body of the world (or according to another image, the « salt of the earth »i).

The idea of a really « universal » religion then rubbed shoulders, it is important to say, with positions that were absolutely contrary, exclusive, and even antagonistic to the last degree, like those of the Essenes.

A text found in Qumran, near the Dead Sea, advocates hatred against all those who are not members of the sect, while insisting on the importance that this « hatred » must remain secret. The member of the Essene sect « must hide the teaching of the Law from men of falsity (anshei ha-‘arel), but must announce true knowledge and right judgment to those who have chosen the way. (…) Eternal hatred in a spirit of secrecy for men of perdition! (sin’at ‘olam ‘im anshei shahat be-ruah hasher!)ii « .

G. Stroumsa comments: « The peaceful conduct of the Essenes towards the surrounding world now appears to have been nothing more than a mask hiding a bellicose theology. »

This attitude is still found today in the « taqqiya » of the Shi’ites, for example.

It should be added that the idea of « holy war » was also part of Essene eschatology, as can be seen in the « War Scroll » (War Scroll, 1QM), preserved in Jerusalem, which is also known as the scroll of « The War of the Sons of Light against the Sons of Darkness ».

Philo of Alexandria, steeped in Greek culture, considered that the Essenes had a « barbaric philosophy », and « that they were in a sense, the Brahmins of the Jews, an elite among the elite. »

Clearch of Soles, a peripatetic philosopher of the 4th century BC, a disciple of Aristotle, had also seriously considered that the Jews were descended from Brahmins, and that their wisdom was a « legitimate inheritance » from India. This idea spread widely, and was apparently accepted by the Jews of that time, as evidenced by the fact that Philo of Alexandriaiii and Flavius Josephusiv naturally referred to it.

The « barbaric philosophy » of the Essenes and the « barbaric wisdom » of the early Christians have one thing in common: they both point to ideas emanating from a more distant East, that of Persia, Oxus and even, ultimately, the Indus.

Among oriental ideas, one is particularly powerful. That of the double of the soul, or the double soul, depending on the point of view.

The text of the Rule of the Community, found in Qumran, gives an indication: « He created man to rule the world, and assigned to him two spirits with which he must walk until the time when He will return: the spirit of truth and the spirit of lie (ruah ha-emet ve ruah ha-avel).”v

There is broad agreement among researchers to detect an Iranian influence in this anthropology. Shaul Shaked writes: « It is conceivable that contacts between Jews and Iranians led to the formulation of a Jewish theology, which, while following traditional Jewish motifs, came to resemble closely the Iranian worldview. »

G. Stroumsa further notes that such duality in the soul is found in the rabbinic idea of the two basic instincts of good and evil present in the human soul (yetser ha-ra’, yetser ha-tov)vi.

This conception has been widely disseminated since ancient times. Far from being reserved for the Gnostics and Manicheans, who seem to have found their most ancient sources in ancient Persia, it had, as we can see, penetrated Jewish thought in several ways.

But it also aroused strong opposition. Christians, in particular, held different views.

Augustine asserts that there can be no « spirit of evil », since all souls come from God.vii In his Counter Faustus, he argues: « As they say that every living being has two souls, one from the light, the other from the darkness, is it not clear that the good soul leaves at the moment of death, while the evil soul remains?”viii

Origen has yet another interpretation: every soul is assisted by two angels, an angel of righteousness and an angel of iniquityix. There are not two opposing souls, but rather a higher soul and another in a lower position.

Manichaeism itself varied on this delicate issue. It presented two different conceptions of the dualism inherent in the soul. The horizontal conception put the two souls, one good and one bad, in conflict. The other conception, vertical, put the soul in relation to its celestial counterpart, its ‘guardian angel’. The guardian angel of Mani, the Paraclete (« the intercessor angel »), the Holy Spirit are all possible figures of this twin, divine soul.

This conception of a celestial Spirit forming a « couple » (suzugia) with each soul was theorised by Tatian the Syrian in the 2nd century AD, as Erik Peterson notes.

Stroumsa points out that « this conception, which was already widespread in Iran, clearly reflects shamanistic forms of thought, according to which the soul can come and go outside the individual under certain conditions.”x

The idea of the soul of Osiris or Horus floating above the body of the dead God, the angels of the Jewish tradition, the Greek « daimon », the split souls of the Gnostics, the Manicheans, or the Iranians, or, even more ancient, the experiences of the shamans, by their profound analogies, testify to the existence of « anthropological constants », of which the comparative study of ancient religions gives a glimpse.

All these traditions converge in this: the soul is not only a principle of life, attached to an earthly body, which would be destined to disappear after death.

It is also attached to a higher, spiritual principle that guards and guides it.

Science has recently taken a step in this direction, foreseen for several millennia, by demonstrating that man’s « spirit » is not only located in the brain itself, but that it is also « diffused » all around him, in the emotional, symbolic, imaginary and social spheres.

Perhaps one day we will be able to objectify in a tangible way this intuition, so ancient, and so « universal ». In the meantime, let us conclude that it is difficult to be satisfied with a narrowly materialistic, mechanical description of the world.

And even less with a philosophy of hatred.

_______

iMt, 5,13

iiQumran P. IX. I. Quoted in Guy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

iiiPhilo of Alexandria. Cf. Quod omnis probus liber sit. 72-94 et Vita Mosis 2. 19-20

ivFlavius Josephus. Contra Apius.. 1. 176-182

vQumran. The Rule of Community. III, 18

viB.Yoma 69b, Baba Bathra 16a, Gen Rabba 9.9)

viiAugustin. De duabus animabus.

viiiAugustin. Contra faustum. 6,8

ixOrigen. Homelies on St Luke.

xGuy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

L’avenir prometteur de l’esprit « barbare »


 

L’idée d’une religion « universelle » est tôt apparue dans l’histoire, en dépit de tous les obstacles dressés par les traditions, les prêtres et les princes.

Les religions tribales ou nationales, les sectes exclusives, réservées à des initiés, n’avaient aucun penchant pour un divin sans frontière. Mais, le divin étant une fois posé dans la conscience des hommes, comment lui assigner quelque limite que ce soit?

Le prophète persan Mani affirmait, cinq siècles avant le prophète Muhammad, qu’il était le « sceau des prophètes ». Deux siècles après Jésus, il voulut le dépasser en « universalité », par un syncrétisme de gréco-bouddhisme et de zoroastrisme. Le manichéisme eut son heure de gloire, et se répandit jusqu’en Chine. Augustin, qui l’embrassa un temps, témoigne de son expansion géographique, et de son emprise sur les esprits. Aujourd’hui encore, le manichéisme, axé sur le grand combat du Bien et du Mal, a sans doute une influence certaine, quoique sous d’autres appellations.

Les premiers Chrétiens ne se percevaient plus comme Juifs ou Gentils. Ils se voyaient comme une « troisième sorte » d’hommes (« triton genos », « tertium genus »), des « trans-humains » en quelque sorte, dirait-on aujourd’hui. Ils promouvaient une nouvelle « sagesse barbare », tant du point de vue des Juifs que de celui des Grecs, une « sagesse » au-delà de la Loi juive et de la philosophie grecque. On ne peut nier qu’ils apportaient un souffle nouveau. Pour la première fois dans l’histoire du monde, les Chrétiens n’étaient pas un peuple parmi les peuples, une nation parmi les nations, mais « une nation issue des nations », ainsi que le formula Aphrahat, au 4ème siècle.

Les Juifs se séparaient des Goyim. Les Grecs s’opposaient aux Barbares. Les Chrétiens sortaient du champ. Ils se voulaient une « nation » non terrestre mais spirituelle, comme une « âme » dans le corps du monde.

A la même époque, des mouvements religieux contraires, et même antagonistes au dernier degré, voyaient le jour. Les Esséniens, par exemple, allaient dans un sens opposé à cette aspiration à l’universalisme religieux. Un texte trouvé à Qumran, près de la mer Morte, prône la haine contre tous ceux qui ne sont pas membres de la secte essénienne, insistant d’ailleurs sur l’importance de garder secrète cette « haine ». Le membre de la secte essénienne « doit cacher l’enseignement de la Loi aux hommes de fausseté (anshei ha-’arel), mais il doit annoncer la vraie connaissance et le jugement droit à ceux qui ont choisi la voie. (…) Haine éternelle dans un esprit de secret pour les hommes de perdition ! (sin’at ‘olam ‘im anshei shahat be-ruah hasher) »i .

G. Stroumsa commente : « La conduite pacifique des Esséniens vis-à-vis du monde environnant apparaît maintenant n’avoir été qu’un masque cachant une théologie belliqueuse. »

Cette attitude silencieusement aggressive est fort répandue dans le monde religieux. On la retrouve par exemple, aujourd’hui encore, dans la « taqqiya » des Shi’ites.

L’idée de « guerre sainte » faisait aussi partie de l’eschatologie essénienne, comme en témoigne le « rouleau de la guerre » (War Scroll, 1QM), conservé à Jérusalem, qui est aussi connu comme le rouleau de « la Guerre des Fils de la Lumière contre les Fils de l’Obscur ».

Philon d’Alexandrie, pétrie de culture grecque, considérait que les Esséniens avaient une « philosophie barbare », mais « qu’ils étaient en un sens, les Brahmanes des Juifs, une élite parmi l’élite. »

Cléarque de Soles, philosophe péripatéticien du 4ème siècle av. J.-C., disciple d’Aristote, avait déjà émis l’opinion que les Juifs descendaient des Brahmanes, et que leur sagesse était un « héritage légitime » de l’Inde. Cette idée se répandit largement, et fut apparemment acceptée par les Juifs de cette époque, ainsi qu’en témoigne le fait que Philon d’Alexandrieii et Flavius Josèpheiii y font référence, comme une idée allant de soi.

La « philosophie barbare » des Esséniens, et la « sagesse barbare » des premiers Chrétiens ont un point commun. Dans les deux cas, elles signalent l’influence d’idées émanant de la Perse, de l’Oxus ou de l’Indus.

Parmi ces idées très « orientales », l’une est particulièrement puissante, celle du double de l’âme, ou de l’âme double, – suivant les points de vue.

Le texte de la Règle de la communauté, trouvé à Qumran, donne une indication : « Il a créé l’homme pour régner sur le monde, et lui a attribué deux esprits avec lesquels il doit marcher jusqu’au temps où Il reviendra : l’esprit de vérité et l’esprit de mensonge (ruah ha-emet ve ruah ha-avel). »iv

Il y a un large accord parmi les chercheurs pour déceler dans cette vision anthropologique une influence iranienne. Shaul Shaked écrit à ce sujet: « On peut concevoir que des contacts entre Juifs et Iraniens ont permis de formuler une théologie juive, qui, tout en suivant des motifs traditionnels du judaïsme, en vint à ressembler de façon étroite à la vision iranienne du monde. »v

G. Stroumsa note pour sa part que cette idée d’une dualité dans l’âme est fort similaire à l’idée rabbinique des deux instincts de base du bien et du mal présents dans l’âme humaine (yetser ha-ra’, yetser ha-tov)vi.

Cette conception dualiste semble avoir été, dès une haute époque, largement disséminée. Loin d’être réservée aux seuls gnostiques ou aux manichéens, qui ont sans doute trouvé dans l’ancienne Perse leurs sources les plus anciennes, elle avait, on le voit, pénétré par plusieurs voies la pensée juive.

En revanche, les premiers Chrétiens avaient une vue différente quant à la réalité de ce dualisme, ou de ce manichéisme.

Augustin, après avoir été un temps manichéen lui-même, finit par affirmer qu’il ne peut y avoir un « esprit du mal », puisque toutes les âmes viennent de Dieu.vii Dans son Contre Faustus, il argumente : « Comme ils disent que tout être vivant a deux âmes, l’une issue de la lumière, l’autre issue des ténèbres, n’est-il pas clair alors que l’âme bonne s’en va au moment de la mort, tandis que l’âme mauvaise reste ? »viii

Origène a une autre interprétation. Toute âme est assistée par deux anges, un ange de justice et un ange d’iniquitéix. Il n’y a pas deux âmes opposées, mais plutôt une âme supérieure et une autre en position inférieure.

Le manichéisme lui-même variait sur cette question. Il présentait deux conceptions différentes du dualisme inhérent à l’âme. La conception horizontale mettait les deux âmes, l’une bonne, l’autre mauvaise, en conflit direct. L’autre conception, verticale, mettait en relation l’âme avec sa contrepartie céleste, son « ange gardien ». L’ange gardien de Mani, le Paraclet (« l’ange intercesseur »), le Saint Esprit sont autant de figures possible de cette âme jumelle, divine.

La conception d’un Esprit céleste formant un « couple » (suzugia) avec chaque âme, avait été théorisée par Tatien le Syrien, au 2ème siècle ap. J.-C., comme l’a rappelé Erik Peterson.

Stroumsa fait remarquer que « cette conception, qui était déjà répandue en Iran, reflète clairement des formes de pensée shamanistes, selon lesquelles l’âme peut aller et venir en dehors de l’individu sous certaines conditions. »x

Il est tentant, dès lors, de penser que l’idée d’âme « double » ou « couplée » avec le monde des esprits fait partie du bagage anthropologique depuis l’aube de l’humanité.

L’âme d’Horus flottant au-dessus du corps du Dieu mort, les anges de la tradition juive, le « daimon » des Grecs, les âmes dédoublées des gnostiques, des manichéens, ou des Iraniens, ou, plus anciennement encore, les expériences des shamans, témoignent d’ une profonde analogie, indépendamment des époques, des cultures, des religions.

Il ressort de toutes ces traditions, si diverses, une leçon unique. L’âme n’est pas seulement un principe de vie, attaché à un corps terrestre, destiné à disparaître après la mort. Elle est aussi attachée à un principe supérieur, spirituel, qui la garde et la guide.

La science moderne a fait récemment un pas dans cette direction de pensée, en postulant l’hypothèse que « l’esprit » de l’homme n’était pas localisé seulement dans le cerveau proprement dit, mais qu’il se diffusait dans l’affectif, le symbolique, l’imaginaire et le social, selon des modalités aussi diverses que difficiles à objectiver.

Il y a là un champ de recherche d’une fécondité inimaginable. L’on pourra peut-être un jour caractériser de manière tangible la variété des imprégnations de « l’esprit » dans le monde.

iQumran P. IX. I. Cité in Guy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

iiPhilon d’Alexandrie. Cf. Quod omnis probus liber sit. 72-94 et Vita Mosis 2. 19-20

iiiFlavius Josèphe. Contre Apion. 1. 176-182

ivQumran. Règle de la communauté. III, 18

vShaul Shaked. Qumran and Iran : Further considerations. 1972, in G. Stroumsa. op. cit

viB.Yoma 69b, Baba Bathra 16a, Gen Rabba 9.9)

viiAugustin. De duabus animabus.

viiiAugustin. Contra faustum. 6,8

ixOrigène. Homélies sur saint Luc.

xGuy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

La philosophie barbare des Esséniens, « Brahmanes des Juifs »


Tôt dans l’histoire apparaît l’idée d’une religion universelle – malgré les obstacles posés par les traditions et l’intérêt des prêtres et des princes.

Cette idée n’entrait pas aisément dans les cadres de pensée, ni dans les représentations du monde bâties par des religions tribales, nationales, ou, a fortiori, par des sectes exclusives, élitistes, réservées à des initiés privilégiés ou à quelques élus.

Mais cinq siècles avant le prophète Muhammad, le prophète persan Mani affirmait déjà qu’il était le « sceau des prophètes ». Il lui revenait en conséquence de fonder une religion universelle. Le manichéisme eut d’ailleurs son heure de gloire. Augustin, qui l’embrassa un temps, témoigne de son expansion et de son succès d’alors dans les territoires contrôlés par Rome, et de son emprise durable sur les esprits.

Le manichéisme promeut un système dualiste de pensée, axé sur le combat éternel du Bien et du Mal ; il n’est pas certain que ces idées aient disparu, de nos jours.

Avant Mani, les premiers Chrétiens se voyaient aussi porteurs d’un message universel. Ils ne se percevaient déjà plus comme Juifs — ou Gentils. Ils se pensaient comme une troisième sorte d’hommes (« triton genos », « tertium genus »), des trans-humains avant la lettre. Ils se voyaient comme les promoteurs d’une nouvelle sagesse, « barbare » du point de vue des Grecs, « scandaleuse » pour les Juifs, – transcendant la prégnance de la Loi et celle de la Raison.

Les Chrétiens n’étaient pas une nation parmi les nations, mais « une nation issue des nations » selon la formule d’Aphrahat, sage persan du 4ème siècle.

Aux dichotomies habituelles, celle des Grecs les opposant aux Barbares, ou celle des Juifs, les opposant aux Goyim, les Chrétiens incarnaient donc une « nation » d’un nouveau type, une « nation » non « nationale », mais purement spirituelle, une « nation » qui serait comme une âme dans le corps du monde (ou suivant une autre image, le « sel de la terre »i).

L’idée d’une religion universelle côtoyait alors, il importe de le dire, des positions absolument contraires, exclusives, et même antagonistes au dernier degré, comme celles des Esséniens.

Un texte trouvé à Qumran, près de la mer Morte, prône la haine contre tous ceux qui ne sont pas membres de la secte, tout en insistant sur l’importance que cette « haine » doit rester secrète. Le membre de la secte essénienne « doit cacher l’enseignement de la Loi aux hommes de fausseté (anshei ha-’arel), mais il doit annoncer la vraie connaissance et le jugement droit à ceux qui ont choisi la voie. (…) Haine éternelle dans un esprit de secret pour les hommes de perdition ! (sin’at ‘olam ‘im anshei shahat be-ruah hasher !) »ii .

G. Stroumsa commente : « La conduite pacifique des Esséniens vis-à-vis du monde environnant apparaît maintenant n’avoir été qu’un masque cachant une théologie belliqueuse. » Cette attitude se retrouve aujourd’hui encore dans la « taqqiya » des Shi’ites, par exemple.

Ajoutons que l’idée de « guerre sainte » faisait aussi partie de l’eschatologie essénienne, comme en témoigne le « rouleau de la guerre » (War Scroll, 1QM), conservé à Jérusalem, qui est aussi connu comme le rouleau de « la Guerre des Fils de la Lumière contre les Fils de l’Obscur ».

Philon d’Alexandrie, pétri de culture grecque, considérait que les Esséniens avaient une « philosophie barbare », et « qu’ils étaient en un sens, les Brahmanes des Juifs, une élite parmi l’élite. »

Cléarque de Soles, philosophe péripatéticien du 4ème siècle av. J.-C., disciple d’Aristote, avait aussi considéré que les Juifs descendaient des Brahmanes, et que leur sagesse était un « héritage légitime » de l’Inde. Cette idée se répandit largement, et fut apparemment acceptée par les Juifs de cette époque, ainsi qu’en témoigne le fait que Philon d’Alexandrieiii et Flavius Josèpheiv y font naturellement référence.

La « philosophie barbare » des Esséniens, et la « sagesse barbare » des premiers Chrétiens ont un point commun : elles pointent l’une et l’autre vers des idées émanant d’un Orient plus lointain, celui de la Perse, de l’Oxus et même, in fine, de l’Indus.

Parmi les idées orientales, l’une est particulièrement puissante. Celle du double de l’âme, ou encore de l’âme double, suivant les points de vue.

Le texte de la Règle de la communauté, trouvé à Qumran, donne une indication : « Il a créé l’homme pour régner sur le monde, et lui a attribué deux esprits avec lesquels il doit marcher jusqu’au temps où Il reviendra : l’esprit de vérité et l’esprit de mensonge (ruah ha-emet ve ruah ha-avel). »v

Il y a un large accord parmi les chercheurs pour déceler dans cette anthropologie une influence iranienne. Shaul Shaked écrit à ce sujet: « On peut concevoir que des contacts entre Juifs et Iraniens ont permis de formuler une théologie juive, qui, tout en suivant des motifs traditionnels du judaïsme, en vint à ressembler de façon étroite à la vision iranienne du monde. »vi

G. Stroumsa note en complément qu’une telle dualité dans l’âme se retrouve dans l’idée rabbinique des deux instincts de base du bien et du mal présents dans l’âme humaine (yetser ha-ra’, yetser ha-tov)vii.

Cette conception a été, dès une haute époque, largement disséminée. Loin d’être réservée aux gnostiques et aux manichéens, qui semblent avoir trouvé dans l’ancienne Perse leurs sources les plus anciennes, elle avait, on le voit, pénétré par plusieurs voies la pensée juive.

Mais elle suscitait aussi de fortes oppositions. Les Chrétiens, notamment, défendaient des vues différentes.

Augustin affirme qu’il ne peut y avoir un « esprit du mal », puisque toutes les âmes viennent de Dieu.viii Dans son Contre Faustus, il argumente : « Comme ils disent que tout être vivant a deux âmes, l’une issue de la lumière, l’autre issue des ténèbres, n’est-il pas clair alors que l’âme bonne s’en va au moment de la mort, tandis que l’âme mauvaise reste ? »ix

Origène a une autre interprétation encore : toute âme est assistée par deux anges, un ange de justice et un ange d’iniquitéx. Il n’y a pas deux âmes opposées, mais plutôt une âme supérieure et une autre en position inférieure.

Le manichéisme lui-même variait sur ce délicat problème. Il présentait deux conceptions différentes du dualisme inhérent à l’âme. La conception horizontale mettait les deux âmes, l’une bonne, l’autre mauvaise, en conflit. L’autre conception, verticale, mettait en relation l’âme avec sa contrepartie céleste, son « ange gardien ». L’ange gardien de Mani, le Paraclet (« l’ange intercesseur »), le Saint Esprit sont autant de figures possible de cette âme jumelle, divine.

Cette conception d’un Esprit céleste formant un « couple » (suzugia) avec chaque âme, avait été théorisée par Tatien le Syrien, au 2ème siècle ap. J.-C., ainsi que le note Erik Peterson.

Stroumsa fait remarquer que « cette conception, qui était déjà répandue en Iran, reflète clairement des formes de pensée shamanistes, selon lesquelles l’âme peut aller et venir en dehors de l’individu sous certaines conditions. »xi

L’idée de l’âme d’Osiris ou d’Horus flottant au-dessus du corps du Dieu mort, les anges de la tradition juive, le « daimon » grec, les âmes dédoublées des gnostiques, des manichéens, ou des Iraniens, ou, plus anciennement encore, les expériences des shamans, par leur profondes analogies, témoignent de l’existence de « constantes anthropologiques », dont l’étude comparée des religions anciennes donne un aperçu.

Toutes ces traditions convergent en ceci : l’âme n’est pas seulement un principe de vie, attaché à un corps terrestre, qui serait destiné à disparaître après la mort.

Elle est aussi rattachée à un principe supérieur, spirituel, qui la garde et la guide.

La science a fait récemment un pas dans cette direction, pressentie depuis plusieurs millénaires, en démontrant que « l’esprit » de l’homme n’était pas localisé seulement dans le cerveau proprement dit, mais qu’il se diffusait tout autour de lui, dans l’affectif, le symbolique, l’imaginaire et le social.

L’on pourra peut-être un jour objectiver de manière tangible cette intuition si ancienne, si universelle. En attendant, concluons qu’il est difficile de se contenter d’une description étroitement matérialiste, mécanique, du monde.

iMt, 5,13

iiQumran P. IX. I. Cité in Guy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

iiiPhilon d’Alexandrie. Cf. Quod omnis probus liber sit. 72-94 et Vita Mosis 2. 19-20

ivFlavius Josèphe. Contre Apion. 1. 176-182

vQumran. Règle de la communauté. III, 18

viShaul Shaked. Qumran and Iran : Further considerations. 1972, in G. Stroumsa. op. cit

viiB.Yoma 69b, Baba Bathra 16a, Gen Rabba 9.9)

viiiAugustin. De duabus animabus.

ixAugustin. Contra faustum. 6,8

xOrigène. Homélies sur saint Luc.

xiGuy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

De l’importance de la « philosophie barbare » pour le futur de l’humanité


 

L’idée d’une religion universelle est assez tôt apparue dans l’histoire, malgré tous les obstacles posés par les traditions et l’intérêt bien compris des prêtres et des princes.

Cette idée n’entrait pas en général dans les cadres habituels de pensée, ni dans les représentations du monde bâties par des religions tribales, nationales, ou, a fortiori, par des sectes exclusives, élitistes, réservées à des initiés privilégiés ou à quelques élus.

Cinq siècles avant le prophète Muhammad, le prophète persan Mani affirmait déjà qu’il était le « sceau des prophètes », et il s’estimait en mesure de fonder une religion délibérément universelle. Le manichéisme eut d’ailleurs son heure de gloire et Augustin, qui l’embrassa un temps, témoigne de son expansion alors, dans les territoires contrôlés par Rome, et de son emprise sur les esprits.

Il n’est pas certain d’ailleurs que le manichéisme, en tant que système dualiste de pensée, axé sur le grand combat du Bien et du Mal, ne soit pas de nos jours toujours très influent.

Avant Mani, les premiers Chrétiens se voyaient aussi porteur d’un message universel. Ils ne se percevaient déjà plus comme Juifs ou Gentils. Ils se pensaient comme une troisième sorte d’hommes (« triton genos », « tertium genus »), des trans-humains avant la lettre. Ils se voyaient comme les promoteurs d’une nouvelle « sagesse barbare », du point de vue des Grecs, une sagesse « barbare » parce que transcendant autant la prégnance de la Loi juive que l’influence philosophique du monde grec. Les Chrétiens n’étaient pas une nation parmi les nations, mais « une nation issue des nations » comme le formulait Aphrahat, sage persan du 4ème siècle.

Aux dichotomies habituelles, celle des Grecs les opposant aux Barbares, ou celle des Juifs, les opposant aux Goyim, les Chrétiens incarnaient un troisième genre d’hommes, une « nation » d’un nouveau type, une nation non charnelle mais purement spirituelle, comme une âme dans le corps (du monde).

Cette tendance naissante à des formes nouvelles d’universalisme religieux côtoyait alors, il importe de le dire, des positions absolument contraires, et même antagonistes au dernier degré, comme celles des Esséniens.

Un texte trouvé à Qumran, près de la mer Morte, prône la haine contre tous ceux qui ne sont pas membres de la secte, tout en insistant sur l’importance que cette « haine » doit rester secrète. Le membre de la secte essénienne « doit cacher l’enseignement de la Loi aux hommes de fausseté (anshei ha-’arel), mais il doit annoncer la vraie connaissance et le jugement droit à ceux qui ont choisi la voie. (…) Haine éternelle dans un esprit de secret pour les hommes de perdition ! (sin’at ‘olam ‘im anshei shahat be-ruah hasher !) »i .

G. Stroumsa commente : « La conduite pacifique des Esséniens vis-à-vis du monde environnant apparaît maintenant n’avoir été qu’un masque cachant une théologie belliqueuse. » Cette attitude se retrouve aujourd’hui encore dans la « taqqiya » des Shi’ites, par exemple.

Ajoutons encore que l’idée de « guerre sainte » faisait aussi partie de l’eschatologie essénienne, comme en témoigne le « rouleau de la guerre » (War Scroll, 1QM), conservé à Jérusalem, qui est aussi connu comme le rouleau de « la Guerre des Fils de la Lumière contre les Fils de l’Obscur ».

Philon d’Alexandrie, pétrie de culture grecque, considérait que les Esséniens avaient une « philosophie barbare », et « qu’ils étaient en un sens, les Brahmanes des Juifs, une élite parmi l’élite. »

Cléarque de Soles, philosophe péripatéticien du 4ème siècle av. J.-C., disciple d’Aristote, avait aussi considéré que les Juifs descendaient des Brahmanes, et que leur sagesse était un « héritage légitime » de l’Inde. Cette idée se répandit largement, et fut apparemment acceptée par les Juifs de cette époque, ainsi qu’en témoigne le fait que Philon d’Alexandrieii et Flavius Josèpheiii y font naturellement référence.

La « philosophie barbare » des Esséniens, et la « sagesse barbare » des premiers Chrétiens ont un point commun : elles pointent l’une et l’autre vers des idées émanant d’un Orient plus lointain, celui de la Perse, de l’Oxus et même, in fine, de l’Indus.

Parmi les idéesorientales, l’une est particulièrement puissante. Celle du double de l’âme, ou encore de l’âme double, suivant les points de vue.

Le texte de la Règle de la communauté, trouvé à Qumran, donne une indication : « Il a créé l’homme pour régner sur le monde, et lui a attribué deux esprits avec lesquels il doit marcher jusqu’au temps où Il reviendra : l’esprit de vérité et l’esprit de mensonge (ruah ha-emet ve ruah ha-avel). »iv

Il y a un large accord parmi les chercheurs pour déceler dans cette anthropologie une influence iranienne. Shaul Shaked écrit à ce sujet: « On peut concevoir que des contacts entre Juifs et Iraniens ont permis de formuler une théologie juive, qui, tout en suivant des motifs traditionnels du judaïsme, en vint à ressembler de façon étroite à la vision iranienne du monde. »v

Stroumsa note en complément qu’une telle dualité dans l’âme se retrouve dans l’idée rabbinique des deux instincts de base du bien et du mal présents dans l’âme humaine (yetser ha-ra’, yetser ha-tov)vi.

Une telle conception semble avoir été, dès une haute époque, largement disséminée. Loin d’être réservée aux gnostiques et aux manichéens, qui semblent avoir trouvé dans l’ancienne Perse leurs sources les plus anciennes, elle avait, on le voit, pénétré par plusieurs voies la pensée juive.

Mais sur ce point, les Chrétiens avaient une vue différente.

Augustin affirme qu’il ne peut y avoir un « esprit du mal », puisque toutes les âmes viennent de Dieu.vii Dans son Contre Faustus, il argumente : « Comme ils disent que tout être vivant a deux âmes, l’une issue de la lumière, l’autre issue des ténèbres, n’est-il pas clair alors que l’âme bonne s’en va au moment de la mort, tandis que l’âme mauvaise reste ? »viii

Origène a une autre interprétation encore : toute âme est assistée par deux anges, un ange de justice et un ange d’iniquitéix. Il n’y a pas deux âmes opposées, mais plutôt une âme supérieure et une autre en position inférieure.

Le manichéisme lui-même variait sur ce délicat problème. Il présentait deux conceptions différentes du dualisme inhérent à l’âme. La conception horizontale mettait les deux âmes, l’une bonne, l’autre mauvaise, en conflit. L’autre conception, verticale, mettait en relation l’âme avec sa contrepartie céleste, son « ange gardien ». L’ange gardien de Mani, le Paraclet (« l’ange intercesseur »), le Saint Esprit sont autant de figures possible de cette âme jumelle, divine.

Cette conception d’un Esprit céleste formant un « couple » (suzugia) avec chaque âme, avait été théorisée par Tatien le Syrien, au 2ème siècle ap. J.-C., ainsi que le note Erik Peterson.

Stroumsa fait remarquer que « cette conception, qui était déjà répandue en Iran, reflète clairement des formes de pensée shamanistes, selon lesquelles l’âme peut aller et venir en dehors de l’individu sous certaines conditions. »x

L’idée fait aussi, sans nul doute, partie des constantes anthropologiques profondes, apparaissant dans l’étude comparée des religions anciennes.

L’âme d’Osiris ou celle d’Horus flottant au-dessus du corps du Dieu mort, les anges de la tradition juive, les « daimon » grecs, les âmes dédoublées des gnostiques, des manichéens, ou des Iraniens, ou, plus anciennement encore, les expériences des shamans, arborent une profonde analogie.

En résumé, toutes ces traditions convergent en ceci : l’âme n’est pas seulement un principe de vie, attaché à un corps terrestre, qui serait destiné à disparaître après la mort.

Elle est aussi rattachée à un principe supérieur, spirituel, qui la garde et la guide.

La science a fait récemment un pas dans cette direction, pressentie depuis plusieurs millénaires, en démontrant que « l’esprit » de l’homme n’était pas localisé seulement dans le cerveau proprement dit, mais qu’il se diffusait tout autour de lui, dans l’affectif, le symbolique, l’imaginaire et le social.

Il y a encore des efforts expérimentaux et théoriques à faire, j’en conviens. Mais, l’on pourra peut-être un jour objectiver de manière tangible cette si ancienne intuition. En attendant, difficile de se contenter d’une description étroitement matérialiste, mécanique, du monde.

iQumran P. IX. I. Cité in Guy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.

iiPhilon d’Alexandrie. Cf. Quod omnis probus liber sit. 72-94 et Vita Mosis 2. 19-20

iiiFlavius Josèphe. Contre Apion. 1. 176-182

ivQumran. Règle de la communauté. III, 18

vShaul Shaked. Qumran and Iran : Further considerations. 1972, in G. Stroumsa. op. cit

viB.Yoma 69b, Baba Bathra 16a, Gen Rabba 9.9)

viiAugustin. De duabus animabus.

viiiAugustin. Contra faustum. 6,8

ixOrigène. Homélies sur saint Luc.

xGuy Stroumsa. Barbarian Philosophy.