Brief Comments on Ten God’s Names


Paulus Ricius, also known as Paulus Israelita, was a humanist and Kabbalist of Jewish origin, converted to Christianity in 1505. He is known for his contributions to « Christian Hebraism » and for his refutation of Jewish arguments against Christianity through Kabbalah. He was one of the architects of the ‘Christian Kabbalah’ . His work Sha’arei Orah – in Latin Portae lucis, the « Gates of Light », was a source of inspiration for comparable projects initiated by scholars such as Conrad Pellicanus or Guillaume Postel.

By consulting Ricius’ Artis Cabalisticae – Hoc est reconditae theologiae et philosophiae scriptorum (1587), as well as De Arcana Dei Providentia and Portae lucis, I found a list of ten names of God that is worth studying.

1. אדנּי Adonai – The Lord

2. אל חי El Hay – The One who Lives

3. Elohim Zabaoth – The God of the Armies

4. Adonai Zabaoth – The Lord of the Armies

5. יהוה YHVH – Yahweh

6. אלהים Elohim – God (literally: The Gods)

7. אל El – God

8. יהֹוִה The YHVH Tetragram, with Elohim’s vocalization:YeHoViH

9. יה Ioh – First and last letter from YHVH

10. אהיה Ehieh – « I am »

The order of these ten names of God is relatively (but not entirely) arbitrary. No hierarchy is possible or relevant in such a matter, one may assume. Let us note that Guillaume Postel, Thomas Aquinas and Paulus Ricius (and many other specialists) offered very different views on the Names to be retained and listed.

As a matter of principle, God’s Names should be considered to have equal value or status.

However, that does not mean that these Names convey the same meaning, the same weight or have the same value.

Almost two centuries after Ricius, Leibniz proposed thirteen names of God, based on God’s own statement to Moses in Ex. 34:6-7 (as already discussed in my blog The other Other) .

It is interesting, I think, to compare Ricius’ list and Leibniz’ one, with their differences, additions, and yawning gaps.

While comparing and weighing both approaches, one has to remember that the count made by Leibniz is indeed arbitrary, and the base for his reasoning quite fragile, though intellectually stimulating.

There is no certainty either that Paulus Ricius’ version of the ten Names may be more accurate.

We should not be too shy entering this field of questioning, either. What is here at stake is to look for some kind of heuristics, akin to serendipity, to help us, poor humans, in mapping our way around a very difficult subject.

For that matter, it may seem relevant to analyze the relationship between the ten names of God and the ten Sefirot, which are divine emanations.

Here is the list of Sefirot as declined in Latin by Paulus Ricius:

Corona. Prudentia. Sapientia. Pulchritudo. Fortitudo. Magnificentia. Fundamentum. Confessio. Victoria. Regnum.

The Hebrew names of Sefirot quoted in the Kabbalah are the following:

Keter (crown), Hokhma (wisdom), Bina (understanding), Hessed (mercy), Gevurah (discipline), Tiferet (beauty), Netzah (victory), Hod (splendour), Yesod (foundation), Malkuth (kingship).

The Sefirot names are organized in a figure, which evokes a kind of human body, very schematic, with corona for head, sapientia and prudentia as two eyes or two ears, fortitudo and magnificentia for both arms, pulchritudo for heart, confessio and victoria for both legs, fundamentum for ‘foundation’ (euphemism for anus) and regnum for sex.

It is certainly worth trying to meditate on possible equivalences or connections between the Sefirot and the ten Names of God, looking for analogies or anagogies :

CoronaKeter may be linked to ‘Adonai’. The Lord wears the only crownthat be. However, who anointed Him? And what this crown is made of? Gold or thorns?

PrudentiaBina may be linked to ‘YHVH’. God is prudent, and understanding. This is why He did not reveal the meaning of His Name, nor its vocalization.

SapientiaHokhma may be linked to ‘El Hay’. Wisdom is always alive in God.

PulchritudoTiferet may be linked to ‘Elohim’. The Scriptures mentions the beauty of the three Men ‘who were God’, meeting Abraham under the oak of Mamre.

FortitudoGevurah may be linked to ‘Adonai Zabaoth’. The ‘Lord of the Armies’ incarnates the essence of forceand discipline.

MagnificentiaHod may be linked to ‘Elohim Zabaoth’. How could the ‘God of the Hosts’ not embody magnificence in all its glory?

FundamentumYesod may be linked to ‘Ioh’. The Name Ioh incarnates the foundation of divinity, with its two fundamental letters.

ConfessioHessed may be linked to ‘Yehovih’. How can you get mercy without at least requesting it, by confessing your sins? The Tetragram YHVH intertwined with the vowels of Elohim is analogous to mercy penetrating the heart.

VictoriaNetzah may be linked to ‘El’. Only El, at the end of times, — or at the ‘extreme’ summit of His eternity –, will be victorious.

RegnumMalkuth may be linked to ‘Ehieh’. By saying « I am whom I will be », God establishes His reign once for all, for the present and the future.

Of course Kabbalah literature is rich in temptatives to link the sefirot to different Names of God.

For instance, just to give a glimpse of possible, acceptable, variations on the same theme, one may quote the following series of associations, that I found in the online literature on the subject.

I would like to note in passing that, after having forged the associations listed above, I discovered that two associations (out of ten) were similar in the list quoted below. I mention this only to show the power (and the limitations) of heuristic serendipity in this obscure arcane.

RegnumMalkuth linked to Adonaï ha Aretz, The Lord of the Earth.

FundamentumYesod linked to ‘Shaddaï El Haï (The Omnipotent Living God).

Magnificentia – Hod linked to Elohim Zabaoth (The God of Armies), — like we did (see above).

VictoriaNetzah linked to ‘YHVH Zabaoth (YHVH of the Hosts).

PulchritudoTiferet linked to ‘Aloah‘ (The Divinity).

FortitudoGevurah linked to ‘Elohim Gibor’ (The Strong God).

ConfessioHessed linked to ‘El‘ (God).

PrudentiaBina linked to ‘YHVH‘, — just like we did (see above).

SapientiaHokhma linked to ‘Iah‘ (another vocalization of the short Name ‘YH’)

CoronaKeter linked to ‘Eyeh‘ (‘I am’).

What can we learn from this sort of exercise?

We learn that all divine Names are ‘ living’ metaphors, which means that they ‘live’ and the may ‘die’.

But all these metaphors, in a way, are also (metaphorically) ‘gravid’, ‘pregnant’ with other, unheard of, new Names, yet to be born out of the most profound depths of language and of our souls.

The Koran is a Torah of « Kindness » said Sabbatai Tsevi


By proclaiming himself « Messiah » in 1648, Sabbatai Tsevi created a movement that was both revolutionary and apocalyptic. He achieved great success, and his messianic vocation was recognized as such by the Jews of Aleppo and Smyrna, his hometown, as well as by many Jewish communities in Eastern Europe, Western Europe and the Middle East.

But, after a beginning as shattering as it was promising, why did Tsevi then apostasize Judaism and convert to Islam in 1666?

Gershom Scholem reports in his study of him that Tsevi was actually seeking, in apostasy, the « mystery of the Divinity ».

In any case, one cannot fail to admire his courage and his spirit of transgression. Tsevi converted spectacularly to Islam, when he was seen as Messiah by a large part of the Jewish communities in the Diaspora. Why? This is due to a profound, difficult, but not unimportant idea – even today.

Tsevi believed that his apostasy, as Messiah, would advance tiqoun (« reparation » or « reconstruction »), thereby working for the restoration of the world.

A foolish bet, full of good intentions.

The tiqoun required broad, radical, revolutionary gestures.

Moses had brought a Law of Truth (Torah Emet) and the Koran a Law of Kindness (Torah Hessed), he said. These two laws had to be reconciled in order to save the world, as the Psalmist says: « Goodness and truth meet » (Ps. 85:11).

It was not necessary to oppose laws and traditions, but to unite them, to conjoin them. As proof, Kabbalists argued that the « divine mystery » is symbolically embodied in the sixth Sefira, Tiferet, which corresponds to the third letter (ו Vav) of the Tetragrammaton, which marks the conjunction, in Hebrew grammar (ו means « and »).

Tsevi, well versed in Kabbalah, was not satisfied with it, however. He thought that the divine mystery was located far above the Sefirot, even beyond the first principle, beyond the idea of the First Cause, beyond the inaccessible Ein-sof, and finally far beyond the very idea of mystery.

The ultimate remains in the holiest simplicity.

That is why, after having been influenced by it for a long time, Sabbatai Tsevi finally rejected the Kabbalah of Luria. He said that « Isaac Louria had built an admirable tank but had not specified who was driving it ».

The admirable chariot was the metaphor then accepted to designate the Sefirot of Louria. This expression also referred to Ezekiel’s famous vision.

The Tsevi question remains relevant today. Who drives the Sefirot’s chariot?

An even more important question, maybe :

Where is this chariot really going?

Doubles langages et triples pensées


Nombreux sont les textes sacrés qui jouent sur les mots, les expressions ambiguës, les acceptions obscures.
C’est là un phénomène universel, qui vaut d’être analysé, et qui demande à être mieux compris.

Le sanskrit classique est une langue où pullulent les jeux verbaux (śleṣa), et les termes à double entente. Mais cette duplicité sémantique n’est pas simplement d’ordre linguistique. Elle tient sa source du Veda même qui lui confère une portée beaucoup plus profonde.

« Le ‘double sens’ est le procédé le plus remarquable du style védique (…) L’objectif est de voiler l’expression, d’atténuer l’intelligibilité directe, bref de créer de l’ambiguïté. C’est à quoi concourt la présence de tant de mots obscurs, de tant d’autres qui sont susceptibles d’avoir (parfois, simultanément) une face amicale, une face hostile. »i

Le vocabulaire du Ṛg Veda fourmille de mots ambigus et de calembours.

Par exemple le mot arí signifie « ami ; fidèle, zélé, pieux » mais aussi « avide, envieux ; hostile, ennemi ». Le mot jána qui désigne les hommes de la tribu ou du clan, mais le mot dérivé jánya signifie « étranger ».

Du côté des calembours, citons śáva qui signifie à la fois « force » et « cadavre », et la proximité phonétique invite à l’attribuer au Dieu Śiva, lui conférant ces deux sens. Une représentation de Śiva au Musée ethnographique de Berlin le montre étendu sur le dos, bleu et mort, et une déesse à l’aspect farouche, aux bras multiples, à la bouche goulue, aux yeux extatiques, lui fait l’amour, pour recueillir la semence divine.

Particulièrement riches en significations contraires sont les mots qui s’appliquent à la sphère du sacré.

Ainsi la racine vṛj- possède deux sens opposés. Elle signifie d’une part « renverser » (les méchants), d’autre part « attirer à soi » (la Divinité) comme le note Louis Renouii. Le dictionnaire sanskrit de Huet propose pour cette racine deux palettes de sens : « courber, tordre ; arracher, cueillir, écarter, exclure, aliéner » et « choisir, sélectionner ; se réserver », dont on voit bien qu’ils peuvent s’appliquer dans deux intentions antagonistes: le rejet ou l’appropriation.

Le mot-clé devá joue un rôle central mais sa signification est particulièrement équivoque. Son sens premier est « brillant », « être de lumière », « divin ». Mais dans RV I,32,12, devá désigne Vṛta, le « caché », le dieu Agni s’est caché comme « celui qui a pris une forme humaine » (I,32,11). Et dans les textes ultérieurs le mot devá s’emploie de façon patente pour désigner les ‘démons’iii.

Cette ambiguïté s’accentue lorsqu’on le préfixe en ādeva ou ádeva : « Le mot ādeva est à part : tantôt c’est un doublet d’ádeva – ‘impie’ qui va jusqu’à se juxtaposer au v. VI 49,15 ; tantôt le mot signifie’ tourné vers les dieux’. Il demeure significatif que deux termes de sens à peu près contraires aient conflué en une seule et même forme. »iv

Cette ambiguïté phonétique du mot est non seulement ‘significative’, mais il me semble qu’elle permet de déceler une crypto-théologie du Dieu négatif, du Dieu « caché » dans sa propre négation…

L ‘ambiguïté installée à ce niveau indique la propension védique à réduire (par glissements et rapprochements phonétiques) l’écart a priori radical entre le Dieu et le Non-Dieu.

La proximité et l’ambiguïté des acceptions permet de relier, par métonymie, la négation nette de Dieu (ádeva) et ce que l’on pourrait désigner comme la ‘procession’ de Dieu vers Lui-même (ādeva).

La langue sanskrite met ainsi en scène plus ou moins consciemment la potentielle réversibilité ou l’équivalence dialectique entre le mot ádeva (« sans Dieu » ou « Non-Dieu ») et le mot ādeva qui souligne au contraire l’idée d’un élan ou d’un mouvement de Dieu « vers » Dieu, comme dans cette formule d’un hymne adressé à Agni: ā devam ādevaṃ, « Dieu tourné vers Dieu », ou « Dieu dévoué à Dieu » (RV VI, 4,1) .

Cette analyse se trouve confirmée par le cas fort net de la notion d’Asura qui conjugue en un seul vocable deux sens opposés à l’extrême, celui de « déité suprême » et celui d’« ennemi des deva »v.

L’ambiguïté des mots rejaillit nommément sur les Dieux. Agni est le type même de la divinité bienfaisante mais il est aussi évoqué comme durmati (insensé) dans un passage de RV VII, 1,22. Ailleurs, on l’accuse de tromper constamment (V,19,4).

Le Dieu Soma joue un rôle éminent dans tous les rites védiques du sacrifice, mais il est lui aussi qualifié de trompeur (RV IX 61,30), et l’on trouve plusieurs occurrences d’un Soma démonisé et identifié à Vtra. vi

Quelle interprétation donner à ces significations opposées et concourantes ?

Louis Renou opte pour l’idée magique. « La réversibilité des actes ainsi que des formules est un trait des pensées magiques. ‘On met en action les divinités contre les divinités, un sacrifice contre son sacrifice, une parole contre sa parole.’ (MS II, 1,7) »vii.

Tout ce qui touche au sacré peut être retourné, renversé.

Le sacré est à la fois la source des plus grands biens mais aussi de la terreur panique, par tout ce qu’il garde de mortellement redoutable.

Si l’on se tourne vers le spécialiste de l’analyse comparée des mythes que fut C. G. Jung, une autre interprétation émerge, celle de la « conjonction des opposés », qui est « synonyme d’inconscience ».

« La conjuctio oppositorum a occupé la spéculation des alchimistes sous la forme du mariage chymique, et aussi celle des kabbalistes dans l’image de Tipheret et de Malkhout, de Dieu et de la Shekinah, pour ne rien dire des noces de l’Agneau. »viii

Jung fait aussi le lien avec la conception gnostique d’un Dieu ‘dépourvu de conscience’ (anennoétos theos). L’idée de l’agnosia de Dieu signifie psychologiquement que le Dieu est assimilé à la ‘numinosité de l’inconscient’, dont témoignent tout autant la philosophie védique de l’Ātman et de Puruṣa en Orient que celle de Maître Eckhart en Occident.

« L’idée que le dieu créateur n’est pas conscient, mais que peut-être il rêve se rencontre également dans la littérature de l’Inde :

Qui a pu le sonder, qui dira

D’où il est né et d’où il est venu ?

Les dieux sont sortis de lui ici.

Qui donc dit d’où ils proviennent ?

Celui qui a produit la création

Qui la contemple dans la très haute lumière du ciel,

Qui l’a faite ou ne l’a pas faite,

Lui le sait ! – ou bien ne le sait-il pas ? »ix

De manière analogue, la théologie de Maître Eckhart implique « une ‘divinité’ dont on ne peut affirmer aucune propriété excepté celle de l’unité et de l’être, elle ‘devient’, elle n’est pas encore de Seigneur de soi-même et elle représente une absolue coïncidence d’opposés. ‘Mais sa nature simple est informe de formes, sans devenir de devenir, sans être d’êtres’. Une conjonction des opposés est synonyme d’inconscience car la conscience suppose une discrimination en même temps qu’une relation entre le sujet et l’objet. La possibilité de conscience cesse là où il n’y a pas encore ‘un autre’. »x

Peut-on se satisfaire de l’idée gnostique (ou jungienne) du Dieu inconscient ? N’y a-t-il pas contradiction pour la Gnose (qui se veut suprêmement ‘connaissance’) de prendre pour Dieu un Dieu inconscient ?

L’allusion faite par Jung à la kabbale juive me permet de revenir sur les ambiguïtés portées par l’hébreu biblique. Cette ambiguïté est particulièrement patente dans les ‘noms de de Dieu’. Dieu est censé être l’Un par excellence, mais on relève formellement dans la Torah dix noms de Dieu : Ehyé, Yah, Eloha, YHVH, El, Elohim, Elohé Israël, Tsévaot, Adonaï, Chaddaï.xi

Cette multiplicité de noms cache en elle une profusion supplémentaire de sens profondément cachés en chacun d’eux. Moïse de Léon, commente ainsi le premier nom cité, Ehyé :

« Le premier nom : Ehyé (‘Je serai’). Il est le secret du Nom propre et il est le nom de l’unité, unique parmi l’ensemble de Ses noms. Le secret de ce nom est qu’il est le premier des noms du Saint béni soit-il. Et en vérité, le secret du premier nom est caché et dissimulé sans qu’il y ait aucun dévoilement ; il est donc le secret de ‘Je serai’ car il persiste en son être dans le secret de la profondeur mystérieuse jusqu’à ce que survienne le Secret de la Sagesse, d’où il y a déploiement de tout. »xii

Un début d’explication est peut-être donné par le commentaire de Moïse de Léon à propos du second nom :

« Le secret de deuxième nom est Yah. Un grand principe est que la Sagesse est le début du nom émergeant de secret de l’Air limpide, et c’est lui, oui lui, qui est destiné à être dévoilé selon le secret de ‘Car Je serai’. Ils ont dit : « ‘Je serai’ est un nom qui n’est pas connu et révélé, ‘Car Je serai’. » Au vrai, le secret de la Sagesse est qu’elle comprend deux lettres, Yod et Hé (…) Bien que le secret de Yah [YH] est qu’il soit la moitié du nom [le nom YHVH], néanmoins il est la plénitude de tout, en ce qu’il est le principe de toute l’existence, le principe de toutes les essences. »xiii

Le judaïsme affirme de façon intransigeante l’unité absolue de Dieu et ridiculise l’idée chrétienne de ‘trinité divine’, mais ne s’interdit pourtant pas quelques incursions dans ce territoire délicat :

« Pourquoi les Sefirot seraient-elles dix et non pas trois, conformément au secret de l’Unité qui reposerait dans le trois ?

Tu as déjà traité et discuté du secret de l’Unité et disserté du secret de : ‘YHVH, notre Dieu, YHVH’ (Dt 6,4). Tu as traité du secret de son unité, béni soit son nom, au sujet de ces trois noms, de même du secret de Sa Sainteté selon l’énigme des trois saintetés : ‘Saint, Saint, Saint’ (Is 6,3).

(…) Il te faut savoir dans le secret des profondeurs de la question que tu as posée que ‘YHVH, notre Dieu, YHVH’ est le secret de trois choses et comment elles sont une. (…) Tu le découvriras dans le secret : ‘Saint, saint, Saint’ (Is 6,3) que Jonathan ben Myiel a dit et a traduit en araméen de cette manière : ‘Saint dans les cieux d’en haut, demeure de sa présence, Saint sur la terre où il accomplit ses exploits, Saint à jamais et pour l’éternité des éternités.’ En effet la procession de la sainteté s’effectue dans tous les mondes en fonction de leur descente et de leur position hiérarchique, et cependant la sainteté est une. »xiv

L’idée de ‘procession des trois Saintetés’ se retrouve presque mot à mot dans les pages de l’ouvrage De la Trinité rédigé par S. Augustin, presque mille avant le Sicle du sanctuaire de Moïse de Léon… Mais qu’importe ! Il semble que notre époque préfère privilégier les oppositions acerbes et radicales plutôt que d’encourager l’observation des convergences et des similarités.

Concluons. Le Véda, par ses mots, montre que le nom devá du Dieu peut jouer avec sa propre négation (ádeva), pour évoquer la « procession » du Dieu « vers le Dieu » (ādeva).

Mille ans plus tard, Dieu a donné à Moïse son triple nom ‘Ehyé Asher Ehyé’. Puis, trois mille ans après le Ṛg Veda, la kabbale juive interprète le mystère du nom Ehyé, comme un ‘Je serai’ qui reste encore à advenir – ‘Car Je serai’. Paradoxe piquant pour un monothéisme radical, elle affirme aussi l’idée d’une « procession » des trois « saintetés » du Dieu Un.

Le langage, qu’il soit védique ou biblique, loin d’être un musée de mots morts et de concepts figés, présente sans cesse, tout au long des âges, l’étendue, la profondeur et la largeur de son envergure. Il charge chaque mot de sens parfois nécessairement contraires, et les nimbe alors de toutes les puissances de l’intention, laquelle se révèle par l’interprétation.

Les mots gardent en réserve toute l’énergie, la sagesse et l’intelligence de ceux qui les pensent comme les intermédiaires de l’impensable absolu.

 

 

iLouis Renou. Choix d’études indiennes. Presses de l’EFEO. Paris, 1997, p.36-37

iiLouis Renou. Choix d’études indiennes. §16. Presses de l’EFEO. Paris, 1997, p.58

iiiLouis Renou. Choix d’études indiennes. §67. Presses de l’EFEO. Paris, 1997, p.103

ivLouis Renou. Choix d’études indiennes. §35. Presses de l’EFEO. Paris, 1997, p.77

vCf. Louis Renou. Choix d’études indiennes. §71. Presses de l’EFEO. Paris, 1997, p.107

viExemples cités par Louis Renou. Choix d’études indiennes. §68. Presses de l’EFEO. Paris, 1997, p.104

vii Louis Renou. Choix d’études indiennes. §77. Presses de l’EFEO. Paris, 1997, p.112

viiiC.G. Jung. Aïon. Trad. Etienne Perrot. M.M. Louzier-Sahler. Albin Michel. 1983, p.88

ixRV X, 129 Strophes 6 et 7. Cité par C.G. Jung, Aïon. Trad. Etienne Perrot. M.M. Louzier-Sahler. Albin Michel. 1983, p.211

xC.G. Jung. Aïon. Trad. Etienne Perrot. M.M. Louzier-Sahler. Albin Michel. 1983, p.212

xiCf. « La Porte des dix noms qui ne sont pas effacés », in Moïse de Léon. Le Sicle du Sanctuaire. Trad. Charles Mopsik. Verdier. 1996. pp.278 à 287.

xii« La Porte des dix noms qui ne sont pas effacés », in Moïse de Léon. Le Sicle du Sanctuaire. Trad. Charles Mopsik. Verdier. 1996. p. 280.

xiii« La Porte des dix noms qui ne sont pas effacés », in Moïse de Léon. Le Sicle du Sanctuaire. Trad. Charles Mopsik. Verdier. 1996. p. 281-282

xiv« La Porte des dix noms qui ne sont pas effacés », in Moïse de Léon. Le Sicle du Sanctuaire. Trad. Charles Mopsik. Verdier. 1996. pp. 290, 292, 294