Kafka the Heretic


-Kafka-

« The first sign of the beginning of knowledge is the desire to die. »i

Kafka had been searching for a long time for the key that could open the doors to true « knowledge ». At the age of 34, he seemed to have found a key, and it was death, or at least the desire to die.

It was not just any kind of death, or a death that would only continue the torment of living, in another life after death, in another prison.

Nor was it just any knowledge, a knowledge that would be only mental, or bookish, or cabalistic…

Kafka dreamed of a death that leads to freedom, infinite freedom.

He was looking for a single knowledge, the knowledge that finally brings to life, and saves, a knowledge that would be the ultimate, – the decisive encounter with « the master ».

« The master »? Language can only be allusive. Never resign yourself to delivering proper names to the crowd. But one can give some clues anyway, in these times of unbelief and contempt for all forms of faith…

« This life seems unbearable, another, inaccessible. One is no longer ashamed of wanting to die; one asks to leave the old cell that one hates to be transferred to a new cell that one will learn to hate. At the same time, a remnant of faith continues to make you believe that, during the transfer, the master will pass by chance in the corridor, look at the prisoner and say: ‘You won’t put him back in prison, he will come to me. » ii

This excerpt from the Winter Diary 1917-1918 is one of the few « aphorisms » that Kafka copied and numbered a little later, in 1920, which seems to give them special value.

After Kafka’s death, Max Brod gave this set of one hundred and nine aphorisms the somewhat grandiloquent but catchy title of « Meditations on Sin, Suffering, Hope and the True Path ».

The aphorism that we have just quoted is No. 13.

Aphorism No. 6, written five days earlier, is more scathing, but perhaps even more embarrassing for the faithful followers of the « Tradition ».

« The decisive moment in human evolution is perpetual. This is why the revolutionary spiritual movements are within their rights in declaring null and void all that precedes them, because nothing has happened yet. » iii

Then all the Law and all the prophets are null and void?

Did nothing « happen » on Mount Moriah or Mount Sinai?

Kafka, – a heretic? A ‘spiritual’ adventurer, a ‘revolutionary’?

We will see in a moment that this is precisely the opinion of a Gershom Scholem about him.

But before opening Kafka’s heresy trial with Scholem, it may be enlightening to quote the brief commentary Kafka accompanies in his aphorism n°6 :

« Human history is the second that passes between two steps taken by a traveler.»iv

After the image of the « master », that of the « traveller »…

This is a very beautiful Name, less grandiose than the « Most High », less mysterious than the Tetragrammaton, less philosophical than « I am » (ehyeh)… Its beauty comes from the idea of eternal exile, of continuous exodus, of perpetual movement…

It is a Name that reduces all human history to a single second, a simple stride. The whole of Humanity is not even founded on firm ground, a sure hold, it is as if it were suspended, fleeting, « between two steps »…

It is a humble and fantastic image.

We come to the obvious: to give up in a second any desire to know the purpose of an endless journey.

Any pretended knowledge on this subject seems derisory to the one who guesses the extent of the gap between the long path of the « traveler », his wide stride, and the unbearable fleetingness of the worlds.

From now on, how can we put up with the arrogance of all those who claim to know?

Among the ‘knowers’, the cabalists play a special role.

The cabal, as we know, has forged a strong reputation since the Middle Ages as a company that explores mystery and works with knowledge.

According to Gershom Scholem, who has studied it in depth, the cabal thinks it holds the keys to knowing the truth:

« The cabalist affirms that there is a tradition of truth, and that it is transmissible. An ironic assertion, since the truth in question is anything but transmissible. It can be known, but it cannot be transmitted, and it is precisely what becomes transmissible in it that no longer contains it – the authentic tradition remains hidden.»v

Scholem does not deny that such and such a cabalist may perhaps « know » the essence of the secret. He only doubts that if he knows it, this essence, he can « transmit » the knowledge to others. In the best of cases he can only transmit its external sign.

Scholem is even more pessimistic when he adds that what can be transmitted from tradition is empty of truth, that what is transmitted « no longer contains it ».

Irony of a cabal that bursts out of hollowed-out splendor. Despair and desolation of a lucid and empty light .

« There is something infinitely distressing in establishing that supreme knowledge is irrelevant, as the first pages of the Zohar teach. »vi

What does the cabal have to do with Kafka?

It so happens that in his « Ten Non-Historical Proposals on the Cabal », Gershom Scholem curiously enlists the writer in the service of the cabal. He believes that Kafka carries (without knowing it) the ‘feeling of the world proper to the cabal’. In return, he grants him a little of the « austere splendor » of the Zohar (not without a pleonasticvii effect):

« The limit between religion and nihilism has found in [Kafka] an impassable expression. That is why his writings, which are the secularized exposition of the cabal’s own (unknown to him) sense of the world, have for many today’s readers something of the austere splendor of the canonical – of the perfect that breaks down. » viii

Kafka, – vacillating ‘between religion and nihilism’?

Kafka, – ‘secularizing’ the cabal, without even having known it?

The mysteries here seem to be embedded, merged!

Isn’t this, by the way, the very essence of tsimtsum? The world as a frenzy of entrenchment, contraction, fusion, opacification.

« The materialist language of the Lurianic Kabbalah, especially in its way of inferring tsimtsum (God’s self-retraction), suggests that perhaps the symbolism that uses such images and formulas could be the same thing. »ix

Through the (oh so materialistic) image of contraction, of shrinkage, the tsimtsum gives to be seen and understood. But the divine self-retraction is embodied with difficulty in this symbolism of narrowness, constraint, contraction. The divine tsimtsum that consents to darkness, to erasure, logically implies another tsimtsum, that of intelligence, and the highlighting of its crushing, its confusion, its incompetence, its humiliation, in front of the mystery of a tsimtsum thatexceeds it.

But at least the image of the tsimtsum has a « materialist » (though non-historical) aura, which in 1934, in the words of a Scholem, could pass for a compliment.

« To understand Kabbalists as mystical materialists of dialectical orientation would be absolutely non-historical, but anything but absurd. » x

The cabal is seen as a mystical enterprise based on a dialectical, non-historical materialism.

It is a vocabulary of the 1930’s, which makes it possible to call « dialectical contradiction » a God fully being becoming « nothingness », or a One God giving birth to multiple emanations (the sefirot)…

« What is the basic meaning of the separation between Eyn Sof and the first Sefira? Precisely that the fullness of being of the hidden God, which remains transcendent to all knowledge (even intuitive knowledge), becomes void in the original act of emanation, when it is converted exclusively to creation. It is this nothingness of God that must necessarily appear to the mystics as the ultimate stage of a ‘becoming nothing’. » xi

These are essential questions that taunt the truly superior minds, those who still have not digested the original Fall, the Sin, and the initial exclusion from Paradise, now lost.

« In Prague, a century before Kafka, Jonas Wehle (…) was the first to ask himself the question (and to answer it in the affirmative) whether, with the expulsion of man, paradise had not lost more than man himself. Was it only a sympathy of souls that, a hundred years later, led Kafka to thoughts that answered that question so profoundly? Perhaps it is because we don’t know what happened to Paradise that he makes all these considerations to explain why Good is ‘in some sense inconsolable’. Considerations that seem to come straight out of a heretical Kabbalah. »xii

Now, Kafka, – a « heretical » Kabbalist ?

Scholem once again presents Kafka as a ‘heretical’ neo-kabbalist, in letters written to Walter Benjamin in 1934, on the occasion of the publication of the essay Benjamin had just written on Kafka in the Jüdische Rundschau...

In this essay, Benjamin denies the theological dimension of Kafka’s works. For him, Kafka makes theater. He is a stranger to the world.

« Kafka wanted to be counted among ordinary men. At every step he came up against the limits of the intelligible: and he willingly made them felt to others. At times, he seems close enough to say, with Dostoyevsky’s Grand Inquisitor: ‘Then it is a mystery, incomprehensible to us, and we would have the right to preach to men, to teach them that it is not the free decision of hearts nor love that matters, but the mystery to which they must blindly submit, even against the will of their consciencexiii. Kafka did not always escape the temptations of mysticism. (…) Kafka had a singular ability to forge parables for himself. Yet he never allowed himself to be reduced to the interpretable, and on the contrary, he took every conceivable measure to hinder the interpretation of his texts. One must grope one’s way into it, with prudence, with circumspection, with distrust. (…) Kafka’s world is a great theater. In his eyes man is by nature an actor. (…) Salvation is not a bounty on life, it is the last outcome of a man who, according to Kafka’s formula, ‘his own frontal bone stands in the way’xiv. We find the law of this theater in the midst of Communication at an Academy: « I imitated because I was looking for a way out and for no other reason ».xv (…) Indeed, the man of today lives in his body like K. in the village at the foot of the castle; he escapes from it, he is hostile to it. It can happen that one morning the man wakes up and finds himself transformed into a vermin. The foreign country – his foreign country – has seized him. It is this air there that blows in Kafka, and that is why he was not tempted to found a religion. » xvi

Kafka is therefore not a cabalist. The ‘supernatural’ interpretation of his work does not hold.
« There are two ways of fundamentally misunderstanding Kafka’s writings. One is the naturalistic interpretation, the other the supernatural interpretation; both, the psychoanalytical and the theological readings, miss the point. »xvii

Walter Benjamin clearly disagrees with Willy Haas, who had interpreted Kafka’s entire work « on a theological model », an interpretation summarized by this excerpt: « In his great novel The Castle, [writes Willy Haas], Kafka represented the higher power, the reign of grace; in his no less great novel The Trial, he represented the lower power, the reign of judgment and damnation. In a third novel, America, he tried to represent, according to a strict stylization, the land between these two powers […] earthly destiny and its difficult demands. « xviii


Benjamin also finds Bernhard Rang’s analysis « untenable » when he writes: « Insofar as the Castle can be seen as the seat of grace, K.’s vain attempt and vain efforts mean precisely, from a theological point of view, that man can never, by his will and free will alone, provoke and force God’s grace. Worry and impatience only prevent and disturb the sublime peace of the divine order. »xix


These analyses by Bernhard Rang or Willy Haas try to show that for Kafka, « man is always wrong before God « xx.


However, Benjamin, who fiercely denies the thread of « theological » interpretation, thinks that Kafka has certainly raised many questions about « judgment », « fault », « punishment », but without ever giving them an answer. Kafka never actually identified any of the « primitive powers » that he staged.
For Benjamin, Kafka remained deeply dissatisfied with his work. In fact, he wanted to destroy it, as his will testifies. Benjamin interprets Kafka from this (doctrinal) failure. « Failure is his grandiose attempt to bring literature into the realm of doctrine, and to give it back, as a parable, the modest vigor that seemed to him alone appropriate before reason. « xxi


« It was as if the shame had to survive him. »xxii This sentence, the last one in The Trial, symbolizes for Benjamin the fundamental attitude of Kafka.
It is not a shame that affects him personally, but a shame that extends to his entire world, his entire era, and perhaps all of humanity.
« The time in which Kafka lives does not represent for him any progress compared to the first beginnings. The world in which his novels are set is a swamp. »xxiii

What is this swamp?
That of oblivion.
Benjamin quotes Willy Haas again, this time to praise him for having understood the deep movement of the trial: « The object of this trial, or rather the real hero of this incredible book, is oblivion […] whose main characteristic is to forget himself […] In the figure of the accused, he has become a mute character here. « xxiv

Benjamin adds: « That this ‘mysterious center’ comes from ‘the Jewish religion’ can hardly be contested. Here memory as piety plays a quite mysterious role. One of Jehovah’s qualities – not any, but the most profound of his qualities – is to remember, to have an infallible memory, ‘to the third and fourth generation’, even the ‘hundredth generation’; the holiest act […] of the rite […] consists in erasing the sins from the book of memory’xxv. »

What is forgotten, Benjamin concludes, is mixed with « the forgotten reality of the primitive world »xxvi, and this union produces « ever new fruits. »xxvii

Among these fruits arises, in the light, « the inter-world », that is to say « precisely the fullness of the world which is the only real thing. Every spirit must be concrete, particular, to obtain a place and a right of city. [….] The spiritual, insofar as it still plays a role, is transformed into spirits. The spirits become quite individual individuals, bearing themselves a name and linked in the most particular way to the name of the worshipper […]. Without inconvenience their profusion is added to the profusion of the world […] One is not afraid to increase the crowd of spirits: […] New ones are constantly being added to the old ones, all of them have their own name which distinguishes them from the others. « xxviii

These sentences by Franz Rosenzweig, quoted by Benjamin, actually deal with the Chinese cult of ancestors. But for Kafka, the world of the ancestors goes back to the infinite, and « has its roots in the animal world »xxix.

For Kafka, beasts are the symbol and receptacle of all that has been forgotten by humans: « One thing is certain: of all Kafka’s creatures, it is the beasts that reflect the most. « xxx

And, « Odradek is the form that things that have been forgotten take. »xxxi
Odradek, this « little hunchback », represents for Kafka, « the primary foundation » that neither « mythical divination » nor « existential theology » provide,xxxii and this foundation is that of the popular genius, « that of the Germans, as well as that of the Jews »xxxiii.

Walter Benjamin then strikes a blow, moving on to a higher order, well beyond religiosities, synagogues and churches: « If Kafka did not pray – which we do not know -, at least he possessed to the highest degree what Malebranche calls ‘the natural prayer of the soul’: the faculty of attention. In which, like the saints in their prayer, he enveloped every creature. « xxxiv

As we said, for Scholem, Kafka was a « heretical cabalist ».
For Benjamin, he was like a « saint », enveloping creatures in his prayers…
In a way, both of them are united in a kind of reserve, and even denigration, towards him.

Scholem wrote to Benjamin: « Kafka’s world is the world of revelation, but from a perspective in which revelation is reduced to its Nothingness (Nichts). »
For him, Kafka presents himself as unable to understand what is incomprehensible about the Law, and the very fact that it is incomprehensible.
Whereas the Cabal displays a calm certainty of being able not only to approach but to ‘understand’ the incomprehensibility of the Law.

Benjamin shares Scholem’s disapproval of Kafka, and goes even further, reproaching him for his lack of ‘wisdom’ and his ‘decline’, which participates in the general ‘decline’ of the tradition: « Kafka’s true genius was (…) to have sacrificed the truth in order to cling to its transmissibility, to its haggadic element. Kafka’s writings (…) do not stand modestly at the feet of doctrine, as the Haggadah stands at the feet of the Halakhah. Although they are apparently submissive, when one least expects it, they strike a violent blow against that submission. This is why, as far as Kafka is concerned, we cannot speak of wisdom. All that remains are the consequences of his decline. « xxxv

Kafka, – a man who lacks wisdom, and in « decline ».
No one is a prophet in his own country.

For my part, I see in Kafka the trace of a dazzling vision, against which the cabal, religion, and this very world, weigh but little.
Not that he really « saw ».
« I have never yet been in this place: one breathes differently, a star, more blinding than the sun, shines beside it. « xxxvi


What is this place? Paradise?
And if he did not « see », what did he « understand »?
Kafka wrote that we were created to live in Paradise, and that Paradise was made to serve us. We have been excluded from it. He also wrote that we are not ‘in a state of sin’ because we have eaten from the Tree of Knowledge, but also because we have not yet eaten from the Tree of Life.
The story is not over, it may not even have begun. Despite all the « grand narratives » and their false promises.
« The path is infinite « xxxvii, he asserted.
And perhaps this path is the expulsion itself, both eternal.
« In its main part, the expulsion from Paradise is eternal: thus, it is true that the expulsion from Paradise is definitive, that life in this world is inescapable « xxxviii.

Here, we are certainly very far from the Cabal or dialectical materialism.

But for Kafka, another possibility emerges, fantastically improbable.
The eternity of expulsion « makes it possible that not only can we continually remain in Paradise, but that we are in fact continually there, regardless of whether we know it or not here. « xxxix

What an heresy, indeed!

_______________________

iFranz Kafka. « Diary », October 25, 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, Ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.446.

iiFranz Kafka. « Diary », October 25, 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.446.

iiiFranz Kafka.  » Diary », October 20, 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.442.

ivFranz Kafka.  » Diary », October 20, 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.443.

vGershom Scholem. Ten Non-Historical Proposals on Kabbalah. To the religious origins of secular Judaism. From mysticism to the Enlightenment. Translated by M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 249.

viGershom Scholem. Ten Non-Historical Proposals on the Kabbalah, III’. To the religious origins of secular Judaism. From mysticism to the Enlightenment. Translated by M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 249.

viiThe Hebrew word zohar (זֹהַר) means « radiance, splendor ».

viiiGershom Scholem. Ten Non-Historical Proposals on Kabbalah, X’. To the religious origins of secular Judaism. From mysticism to the Enlightenment. Translated by M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 256.

ixGershom Scholem. Ten Non-Historical Proposals on the Kabbalah, IV’. To the religious origins of secular Judaism. From mysticism to the Enlightenment. Translated by M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 251.

xGershom Scholem. Ten Non-Historical Proposals on the Kabbalah, IV’. To the religious origins of secular Judaism. From mysticism to the Enlightenment. Translated by M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 251.

xiGershom Scholem. Ten Non-Historical Proposals on the Kabbalah, V’. To the religious origins of secular Judaism. From mysticism to the Enlightenment. Translated by M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 252.

xiiGershom Scholem. Ten Non-Historical Proposals on Kabbalah, X’. To the religious origins of secular Judaism. From mysticism to the Enlightenment. Translated by M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 255-256.

xiiiF.M. Dostoëvski. The Brothers Karamazov. Book V, chap. 5, Trad. Henri Mongault. Ed. Gallimard. Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, 1952, p. 278.

xivFranz Kafka, Œuvres complètes, t.III, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.493

xvFranz Kafka, Œuvres complètes, t.II, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.517

xviWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.429-433

xviiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p. 435

xviiiW. Haas, quoted by Walter Benjamin. Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.435

xixBernhard Rang « Franz Kafka » Die Schildgenossen, Augsburg. p.176, quoted in Walter Benjamin. Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.436

xxWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.436

xxiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.438

xxiiFranz Kafka. The Trial. Œuvres complètes, t.I, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.466

xxiiiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.439

xxivW. Haas, quoted by Walter Benjamin. Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.441

xxvW. Haas, quoted by Walter Benjamin. Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.441

xxviWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka . On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.441

xxviiWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka . On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.441

xxviiiFranz Rosenzweig, The Star of Redemption, trans. A. Derczanski and J.-L. Schlegel, Paris Le Seuil, 1982, p. 92, quoted by Walter Benjamin. Franz Kafka. On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.442

xxixWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka . On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.442

xxxWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka . On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.443

xxxiWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka . On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.444

xxxiiWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka . On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.445

xxxiiiWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka . On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.445-446

xxxivWalter Benjamin. Franz Kafka . On the tenth anniversary of his death’. Works, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.446

xxxvQuoted by David Biale. Gershom Scholem. Cabal and Counter-history. Followed by G. Scholem: « Dix propositions anhistoriques sur la cabale. « Trad. J.M. Mandosio. Ed de l’Éclat. 2001, p.277

xxxviFranz Kafka. « Newspapers « , November 7, 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.447

xxxviiFranz Kafka. « Newspapers « , November 25, 1917, aphorism 39b. Œuvres complètes, t.III, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.453.

xxxviiiFranz Kafka. « Newspapers « , December 11, 1917, aphorism 64-65. Œuvres complètes, t.III, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.458.

xxxixFranz Kafka. « Newspapers « , December 11, 1917, aphorism 64-65. Œuvres complètes, t.III, ed. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.458.

Kafka l’hérétique


 

« Le premier signe d’un début de connaissance est le désir de mourir. »i

Kafka a longtemps cherché la clé qui pourrait lui ouvrir les portes de la véritable « connaissance ». A l’âge de 34 ans, il semble qu’il ait trouvé une clé, et c’était la mort, ou au moins le désir de mourir.

Il ne s’agissait pas de n’importe quelle sorte de mort, ou d’une mort qui ne ferait que continuer le tourment de vivre, dans une autre vie après la mort, dans une autre prison.

Il ne s’agissait pas non plus de n’importe quelle connaissance, une connaissance qui serait seulement mentale, ou livresque, ou cabalistique…

Kafka rêvait d’une mort qui conduise à la liberté, la liberté infinie.

Il cherchait une seule connaissance, la connaissance qui fait enfin vivre, et qui sauve, une connaissance qui serait l’ultime, – la rencontre décisive avec « le maître ».

« Le maître » ? Le langage ne peut être qu’allusif. Ne jamais se résigner à livrer des noms propres à la foule. Mais on peut donner quelques indices quand même, en ces époques d’incroyance et de mépris pour toutes formes de foi…

« Cette vie paraît insupportable, une autre, inaccessible. On n’a plus honte de vouloir mourir ; on demande à quitter la vieille cellule que l’on hait pour être transféré dans une cellule nouvelle que l’on apprendra à haïr. Un reste de foi continue en même temps à vous faire croire que, pendant le transfert, le maître passera par hasard dans le couloir, regardera le prisonnier et dira : ‘Celui-là, vous ne le remettrez pas en prison, il viendra chez moi’. »ii

Cet extrait du Journal de l’hiver 1917-1918 fait partie des quelques « aphorismes » que Kafka a recopiés et numérotés un peu plus tard, en 1920, ce qui semble leur accorder une valeur particulière.

Après la mort de Kafka, Max Brod a d’ailleurs donné à cet ensemble de cent neuf aphorismes le titre un peu grandiloquent, mais accrocheur, de « Méditations sur le péché, la souffrance, l’espoir et le vrai chemin ».

L’aphorisme que l’on vient de citer porte le n°13.

L’aphorisme n°6, écrit cinq jours auparavant, est plus cinglant, mais peut-être plus embarrassant pour les tenants fidèles de la « Tradition ».

« L’instant décisif de l’évolution humaine est perpétuel. C’est pourquoi les mouvements spirituels révolutionnaires sont dans leur droit en déclarant nul et non avenu tout ce qui les précède, car il ne s’est encore rien passé. »iii

Alors, toute la Loi, et tous les prophètes, nuls et non avenus ?

Rien ne s’est-il « passé » sur le mont Moriah ou le mont Sinaï?

Kafka, – un hérétique ? Un aventurier ‘spirituel’, un ‘révolutionnaire’ ?

On va voir dans un instant que c’est précisément là l’opinion d’un Gershom Scholem à son sujet.

Mais avant d’ouvrir avec Scholem le procès en hérésie de Kafka, il peut être éclairant de citer le bref commentaire dont Kafka accompagne l’aphorisme n°6 :

« L’histoire humaine est la seconde qui s’écoule entre deux pas faits par un voyageur. »iv

Après l’image du « maître », celle du « voyageur »…

C’est là un très beau Nom, moins grandiose que le « Très-Haut », moins mystérieux que le Tétragramme, moins philosophique que « Je suis » (éhyéh)… Sa beauté vient de l’idée d’exil éternel, d’exode continuel, de mouvance perpétuelle…

C’est un Nom qui réduit toute l’Histoire humaine à une seule seconde, une simple enjambée. Toute l’Humanité n’est même pas fondée sur un sol ferme, une emprise assurée, elle est comme en suspens, fugace, « entre deux pas »…

Image humble et fantastique.

On en vient à l’évidence : renoncer en une seconde à tout désir de connaître le but d’un voyage sans fin.

Toute prétendue connaissance à ce sujet semble dérisoire pour celui qui devine l’ampleur de l’écart entre le long chemin du « voyageur », son ample foulée, et l’insoutenable fugacité des mondes.

Désormais, comment supporter l’arrogance de tous ceux qui proclament savoir ?

Parmi les ‘sachants’, les cabalistes jouent un rôle spécial.

La cabale, on le sait, s’est forgée depuis le Moyen Âge une forte réputation comme entreprise d’exploration du mystère, de travail de la connaissance.

Selon Gershom Scholem, qui l’a savamment étudiée, la cabale pense détenir des clés pour connaître la vérité:

« Le cabaliste affirme qu’il y a une tradition de la vérité, et qu’elle est transmissible. Affirmation ironique, puisque la vérité dont il s’agit est tout sauf transmissible. Elle peut être connue mais on ne saurait la transmettre, et c’est justement ce qui, en elle, devient transmissible qui ne la contient plus – la tradition authentique reste cachée. »v

Scholem ne nie pas que tel ou tel cabaliste puisse peut-être « connaître » l’essence du secret. Il doute seulement que s’il la connaît, cette essence, il puisse en « transmettre » la connaissance à d’autres. Dans le meilleur des cas il ne peut qu’en transmettre le signe extérieur.

Scholem se montre même plus pessimiste encore, lorsqu’il ajoute que ce que l’on peut transmettre de la tradition est vide de vérité, que ce que l’on en transmet « ne la contient plus ».

Ironie d’une cabale qui éclate d’une splendeur évidée. Désespoir et désolation d’une lumière lucide et vide…

« Il y a quelque chose d’infiniment désolant à établir que la connaissance suprême est sans objet, comme l’enseignent les premières pages du Zohar. »vi

Quel rapport la cabale a-t-elle avec Kafka ?

Il se trouve que dans ses « Dix propositions non historiques sur la Cabale », Gershom Scholem enrôle curieusement l’écrivain au service de la cabale. Il estime que Kafka porte (sans le savoir) le ‘sentiment du monde propre à la cabale’. Il lui concède en retour un peu de la « splendeur austère » du Zohar (non sans un effet pléonastiquevii) :

« La limite entre religion et nihilisme a trouvé chez [Kafka] une expression indépassable. C’est pourquoi ses écrits, qui sont l’exposé sécularisé du sentiment du monde propre à la cabale (qui lui était inconnue) ont pour maints lecteurs d’aujourd’hui quelque chose de la splendeur austère du canonique – du parfait qui se brise. »viii

Kafka, – vacillant ‘entre religion et nihilisme’ ? Kafka, – ‘sécularisant’ la cabale, sans même l’avoir connue ?

Les mystères ici semblent enchâssés, fusionnés !

N’est-ce pas là, d’ailleurs, l’essence même du tsimtsoum ? Le monde comme frénésie d’enchâssement, de contraction, de fusion, d’opacification.

« Le langage matérialiste de la Kabbale lourianique, en particulier dans sa manière de déduire le tsimtsoum (l’auto-rétractation de Dieu), suggère l’idée que peut-être la symbolique qui utilise de telles images et de telles formules pourrait de surcroît être la chose même. »ix

Par l’image (ô combien matérialiste) de contraction, de rétrécissement, le tsimtsoum donne à voir et à comprendre. Mais l’auto-rétractation divine s’incarne difficilement dans cette symbolique d’étroitesse, de contrainte, de contraction. Le tsimtsoum divin qui consent à l’obscurité, à l’effacement, implique logiquement un autre tsimtsoum, celui de l’intelligence, et la mise en évidence de son écrasement, de sa confusion, de son incompétence, de son humiliation, devant le mystère d’un tsimtsoum qui la dépasse.

Mais au moins l’image du tsimtsoum possède une aura « matérialiste » (quoique non-historique), ce qui, en 1934, sous la plume d’un Scholem, pouvait passer pour un compliment.

« Comprendre les kabbalistes comme des matérialistes mystiques d’orientation dialectique serait absolument non historique, mais tout sauf absurde. »x

La cabale, vue comme une entreprise mystique fondée sur un matérialisme dialectique, non-historique.

C’est un vocabulaire de l’époque, qui permet d’appeler « contradiction dialectique » un Dieu pleinement être se faisant « néant », ou encore de concevoir un Dieu Un donnant naissance à de multiples émanations (les sefirot)…

« Quel est au fond le sens de la séparation entre l’Eyn Sof et la première Sefira ? Précisément que la plénitude d’être du Dieu caché, laquelle reste transcendante à toute connaissance (même à la connaissance intuitive), devient néant dans l’acte originel de l’émanation, lorsqu’elle se convertit exclusivement à la création. C’est ce néant de Dieu qui devait nécessairement apparaître aux mystiques comme l’ultime étape d’un ‘devenir rien’. »xi

Ce sont là des questions essentielles, qui taraudent les esprits vraiment supérieurs, ceux qui n’ont toujours pas digéré la Chute originelle, le Péché, et l’exclusion initiale du Paradis, désormais perdu.

« A Prague, un siècle avant Kafka, Jonas Wehle (…) est le premier à s’être posé la question (et à y répondre par l’affirmative) de savoir si, avec l’expulsion de l’homme, le Paradis n’avait pas davantage perdu que l’homme lui-même. Est-ce seulement une sympathie des âmes qui, cent ans plus tard, a conduit Kafka à des pensées qui y répondaient si profondément ? C’est peut-être parce que nous ignorons ce qu’il est advenu du Paradis qu’il fait toutes ces considérations pour expliquer en quoi le Bien est ‘en un certain sens inconsolable’. Considérations qui semblent sortir tout droit d’une kabbale hérétique. »xii

Kafka, – un kabbaliste « hérétique » !

Scholem présente à nouveau Kafka comme un néo-kabbaliste ‘hérétique’, dans des lettres écrites à Walter Benjamin en 1934, à l’occasion de la parution de l’essai que celui-ci venait d’écrire sur Kafka dans la Jüdische Rundschau

Dans cet essai, Benjamin nie la dimension théologique des œuvres de Kafka. Pour lui, Kafka fait du théâtre. Il est étranger au monde.

« Kafka voulait être compté parmi les hommes ordinaires. Il se heurtait à chaque pas aux limites de l’intelligible : et il les faisait volontiers sentir aux autres. Parfois, il semble assez près de dire, avec le Grand Inquisiteur de Dostoïevski : ‘Alors c’est un mystère, incompréhensible pour nous, et nous aurions le droit de prêcher aux hommes, d’enseigner que ce n’est pas la libre décision des cœurs ni l’amour qui importent, mais le mystère auquel ils doivent se soumettre aveuglément, même contre le gré de leur conscience’xiii. Kafka n’a pas toujours échappé aux tentations du mysticisme. (…) Kafka avait une singulière aptitude à se forger des paraboles. Il ne se laisse pourtant jamais réduire à de l’interprétable, et a au contraire, pris toutes les dispositions concevables pour faire obstacle à l’interprétation de ses textes. Il faut s’y enfoncer à tâtons, avec prudence, avec circonspection, avec méfiance. (…) Le monde de Kafka est un grand théâtre. A ses yeux l’homme est par nature comédien. (…) Le salut n’est pas une prime sur la vie, c’est la dernière issue d’un homme à qui, selon la formule de Kafka, ‘son propre os frontal barre le chemin’xiv. La loi de ce théâtre, nous la trouvons au milieu de la Communication à une Académie : ‘J’imitais parce que je cherchais une issue et pour nulle autre raison.’xv (…) En effet, l’homme d’aujourd’hui vit dans son corps comme K. dans le village au pied du château ; il lui échappe, il lui est hostile. Il peut arriver que l’homme un matin se réveille et se trouve transformé en vermine. Le pays étranger – son pays étranger – s’est emparé de lui. C’est cet air là qui souffle chez Kafka, et c’est pourquoi il n’a pas été tenté de fonder une religion.»xvi

Kafka n’est donc pas un cabaliste. L’interprétation ‘surnaturelle’ de son œuvre ne tient pas.

« Il y a deux manières de méconnaître fondamentalement les écrits de Kafka. L’une est l’interprétation naturaliste, l’autre l’interprétation surnaturelle ; l’une comme l’autre, la lecture psychanalytique comme la lecture théologique, passent à côté de l’essentiel. »xvii

Walter Benjamin s’inscrit nettement en faux contre Willy Haas qui avait interprété l’ensemble de l’œuvre de Kafka « sur un modèle théologique », une interprétation résumée par cet extrait : « Dans son grand roman Le Château, [écrit Willy Haas], Kafka a représenté la puissance supérieure, le règne de la grâce ; dans son roman Le Procès, qui n’est pas moins grand, il a représenté la puissance inférieure, le règne du jugement et de la damnation. Dans un troisième roman, L’Amérique, il a essayé de représenter, selon une stricte stylisation, la terre entre ces deux puissances […] la destinée terrestre et ses difficiles exigences. »xviii

Benjamin trouve également « intenable » l’analyse de Bernhard Rang qui écrit : « Dans la mesure où l’on peut envisager le Château comme le siège de la grâce, la vaine tentative et les vains efforts de K. signifient précisément, d’un point de vue théologique, que l’homme ne peut jamais, par sa seule volonté et son seul libre-arbitre, provoquer et forcer la grâce de Dieu. L’inquiétude et l’impatience ne font qu’empêcher et troubler la paix sublime de l’ordre divin. »xix

Ces analyses de Bernhard Rang ou de Willy Haas tentent de montrer que pour Kafka, « l’homme a toujours tort devant Dieu »xx.

Or, niant farouchement le filon de l’interprétation « théologique », Benjamin pense que Kafka a certes soulevé de nombreuses questions sur le « jugement », la « faute », le « châtiment », mais sans jamais leur donner de réponse. Kafka n’a en réalité jamais identifié aucune des « puissances primitives » qu’il a mises en scène.

Pour Benjamin, Kafka est resté profondément insatisfait de son œuvre. Il voulait d’ailleurs la détruire, comme son testament en témoigne. Benjamin interprète Kafka à partir de cet échec (doctrinal). « Échec est sa grandiose tentative pour faire passer la littérature dans le domaine de la doctrine, et pour lui rendre, comme parabole, la modeste vigueur qui lui paraissait seule de mise devant la raison. »xxi

« C’était comme si la honte dût lui survivre. »xxii Cette phrase, la dernière du Procès, symbolise pour Benjamin l’attitude fondamentale de Kafka.

Ce n’est pas là une honte qui le toucherait lui, personnellement, mais une honte s’étendant à tout son monde, toute son époque, et peut-être toute l’humanité.

« L’époque où vit Kafka ne représente pour lui aucun progrès par rapport aux premiers commencements. Le monde où se déroulent ses romans est un marécage. »xxiii

Quel est ce marécage ?

Celui de l’oubli.

Benjamin cite à nouveau Willy Haas, cette fois pour l’encenser d’avoir compris le mouvement profond du procès : « L’objet de ce procès, ou plutôt le véritable héros de ce livre incroyable est l’oubli […] dont la principale caractéristique est de s’oublier lui-même […] Dans la figure de l’accusé, il est devenu ici un personnage muet. »xxiv Benjamin ajoute : « Que ce ‘centre mystérieux’ provienne de ‘la religion juive’, on ne peut guère le contester. ‘Ici, la mémoire en tant que piété joue un rôle tout à fait mystérieux. Une des qualités de Jéhovah – non pas une quelconque, mais la plus profonde de ses qualités – est de se souvenir, d’avoir une mémoire infaillible, ‘jusqu’à la troisième et la quatrième génération’, voire la ‘centième génération’ ; l’acte le plus saint […] du rite […] consiste à effacer les péchés du livre de la mémoire’xxv. »

Ce qui est oublié, conclut Benjamin, est mêlé à « la réalité oubliée du monde primitif »xxvi, et cette union engendre des « fruits toujours nouveaux »xxvii. Parmi ces fruits surgit, à la lumière, « l’intermonde », c’est-à-dire « précisément la plénitude du monde qui est la seule chose réelle. Tout esprit doit être concret, particulier, pour obtenir un lieu et un droit de cité. [.…] Le spirituel, dans la mesure où il exerce encore un rôle, se mue en esprits. Les esprits deviennent des individus tout à fait individuels, portant eux-mêmes un nom et liés de la manière la plus particulière au nom de l’adorateur […]. Sans inconvénient on ajoute à profusion leur profusion à la profusion du monde […] On n’y craint pas d’accroître la foule des esprits : […] sans cesse de nouveaux s’ajoutent aux anciens, tous ont un nom propre qui les distingue des autres. »xxviii

Ces phrases de Franz Rosenzweig citées par Benjamin traitent en réalité du culte chinois des ancêtres. Mais justement, pour Kafka le monde des ancêtres remonte à l’infini, et « plonge ses racines dans le monde animal »xxix. Les bêtes sont pour Kafka le symbole et le réceptacle de tout ce qui est tombé dans l’oubli, pour les humains : « une chose est sûre : parmi toutes les créatures de Kafka, ce sont les bêtes qui réfléchissent le plus. »xxx Et, « Odradek est la forme que prennent les choses tombées dans l’oubli. »xxxi

Odradek, ce « petit bossu », représente pour Kafka, « l’assise première » que ne lui fournissent ni la « divination mythique », ni la « théologie existentielle »xxxii, et cette assise est celle du génie populaire, « celui des Allemands, comme celui des Juifs »xxxiii.

Walter Benjamin porte alors son coup d’estoc, passant à un ordre supérieur, bien au-delà des religiosités, des synagogues et des églises : « Si Kafka n’a pas prié – ce que nous ignorons –, du moins possédait-il au plus haut degré, ce que Malebranche appelle ‘la prière naturelle de l’âme’: la faculté d’attention. En laquelle, comme les saints dans leur prière, il enveloppait toute créature. »xxxiv

Pour Scholem, Kafka était un « cabaliste hérétique ».

Pour Benjamin, il est comme un « saint », enveloppant les créatures de ses prières…

L’un et l’autre se rejoignent dans une sorte de réserve, et même de dénigrement à son égard.

Scholem écrit à Benjamin : « Le monde de Kafka est le monde de la révélation, mais dans une perspective où la révélation se réduit à son Néant (Nichts). »

Pour lui, Kafka se présente comme incapable de comprendre ce que la Loi a d’incompréhensible, et le fait même qu’elle soit incompréhensible.

Alors que la Cabale affiche une calme certitude de pouvoir non seulement approcher mais ‘comprendre’ l’incompréhensible de la Loi.

Benjamin partage la réprobation de Scholem à l’égard de Kafka, et va même plus loin, lui reprochant son manque de ‘sagesse’ et son ‘déclin’, qui participe du ‘déclin’ général de la tradition : « Le vrai génie de Kafka fut (…) d’avoir sacrifié la vérité pour s’accrocher à sa transmissibilité, à son élément haggadique. Les écrits de Kafka (…) ne se tiennent pas modestement aux pieds de la doctrine, comme la Haggadah se tient aux pieds de la Halakhah. Bien qu’ils se soumettent en apparence, ils donnent, au moment où on s’y attend le moins, un violent coup de patte contre cette soumission. C’est pourquoi, en ce qui concerne Kafka, nous ne pouvons parler de sagesse. Il ne reste que les conséquences de son déclin. »xxxv

Kafka, – un homme qui manque de sagesse, en déclin.

Nul n’est prophète en son pays.

Pour ma part, je vois en Kafka la trace d’une vision fulgurante, auprès de laquelle la cabale, la religion, et ce monde même, ne pèsent que peu.

Non pas qu’il ait vraiment vu.

« Jamais encore je ne fus en ce lieu : on y respire autrement, un astre, plus aveuglant que le soleil, rayonne à côté de lui. »xxxvi

Quel est ce lieu ? Le Paradis ?

Et s’il n’a pas « vu », qu’a-t-il « compris » ?

Kafka a écrit que nous avons été créés pour vivre dans le Paradis, et que le Paradis était fait pour nous servir. Nous en avons été exclus. Il a aussi écrit que nous ne sommes pas ‘en état de péché’ parce que nous avons mangé de l’Arbre de la Connaissance, mais aussi parce que nous n’avons pas encore mangé de l’Arbre de Vie.

L’histoire n’est pas finie, elle n’a peut-être même pas encore commencé. Malgré tous les « grands récits » et leurs fausses promesses.

« Le chemin est infini »xxxvii, affirme-t-il.

Et peut-être que ce chemin est l’expulsion même, l’un et l’autre éternels.

« Dans sa partie principale, l’expulsion du Paradis est éternelle : ainsi, il est vrai que l’expulsion du Paradis est définitive, que la vie en ce monde est inéluctable »xxxviii.

Nous sommes là assurément très loin de la Cabale ou du matérialisme dialectique.

Et pour Kafka, une autre possibilité encore émerge, fantastiquement improbable.

L’éternité de l’expulsion « rend malgré tout possible que non seulement nous puissions continuellement rester au Paradis, mais que nous y soyons continuellement en fait, peu importe que nous le sachions ou non ici. »xxxix

Quelle hérésie !

iFranz Kafka. « Journaux », 25 octobre 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.446

iiFranz Kafka. « Journaux », 25 octobre 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.446

iiiFranz Kafka. « Journaux », 20 octobre 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.442

ivFranz Kafka. « Journaux », 20 octobre 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.443

vGershom Scholem. ‘Dix propositions non historiques sur la Kabbale’. Aux origines religieuses du judaïsme laïque. De la mystique aux Lumières. Trad. M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 249

viGershom Scholem. ‘Dix propositions non historiques sur la Kabbale, III’. Aux origines religieuses du judaïsme laïque. De la mystique aux Lumières. Trad. M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 249

viiLe mot hébreu zohar (זֹהַר) signifie « éclat, splendeur ».

viiiGershom Scholem. ‘Dix propositions non historiques sur la Kabbale, X’. Aux origines religieuses du judaïsme laïque. De la mystique aux Lumières. Trad. M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 256

ixGershom Scholem. ‘Dix propositions non historiques sur la Kabbale, IV’. Aux origines religieuses du judaïsme laïque. De la mystique aux Lumières. Trad. M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 251

xGershom Scholem. ‘Dix propositions non historiques sur la Kabbale, IV’. Aux origines religieuses du judaïsme laïque. De la mystique aux Lumières. Trad. M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 251

xiGershom Scholem. ‘Dix propositions non historiques sur la Kabbale, V’. Aux origines religieuses du judaïsme laïque. De la mystique aux Lumières. Trad. M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 252

xiiGershom Scholem. ‘Dix propositions non historiques sur la Kabbale, X’. Aux origines religieuses du judaïsme laïque. De la mystique aux Lumières. Trad. M. de Launay. Ed. Calmann-Lévy, 2000. p. 255-256

xiiiF.M. Dostoëvski. Les Frères Karamazov. Livre V, chap. 5, Trad. Henri Mongault. Ed. Gallimard. Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, 1952, p. 278.

xivFranz Kafka, Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.493

xvFranz Kafka, Œuvres complètes, t.II, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.517

xviWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.429-433

xviiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.435

xviiiW. Haas, cité par Walter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.435

xixBernhard Rang. « Franz Kafka » Die Schildgenossen, Augsburg. p.176, cit. in Walter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.436

xxWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.436

xxiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.438

xxiiFranz Kafka. Le Procès. Œuvres complètes, t.I, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.466

xxiiiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.439

xxivW. Haas, cité par Walter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.441

xxvW. Haas, cité par Walter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.441

xxviWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.441

xxviiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.441

xxviiiFranz Rosenzweig, L’Étoile de la rédemption, trad. A. Derczanski et J.-L. Schlegel, Paris Le Seuil, 1982, p. 92, cité par Walter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.442

xxixWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.442

xxxWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.443

xxxiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.444

xxxiiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.445

xxxiiiWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.445-446

xxxivWalter Benjamin. ‘Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort’. Œuvres, II. Gallimard Folio. Paris, 2000, p.446

xxxvCité par David Biale. Gershom Scholem. Cabale et Contre-histoire. Suivi de G. Scholem : « Dix propositions anhistoriques sur la cabale. » Trad. J.M. Mandosio. Ed de l’Éclat. 2001, p.277

xxxviFranz Kafka. « Journaux », 7 novembre 1917. Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.447

xxxviiFranz Kafka. « Journaux », 25 novembre 1917, aphorisme 39b. Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.453

xxxviiiFranz Kafka. « Journaux », 11 décembre 1917, aphorisme 64-65. Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.458

xxxixFranz Kafka. « Journaux », 11 décembre 1917, aphorisme 64-65. Œuvres complètes, t.III, éd. Claude David, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, Paris 1976, p.458

La puissance de l’Inhumain — et l’idée du suicide en Dieu


Bien qu’ils appartiennent à des planètes fort éloignées, Paul Valéry et Franz Kafka ont au moins un point commun. L’un et l’autre ont eu l’honneur d’une célébration de leurs anniversaires respectifs par Walter Benjamini.

Pourquoi Benjamin a-t-il souhaité rapprocher en un hommage symbolique deux écrivains aussi différents?

Il a été sensible, je crois, au fait qu’ils ont tous les deux cherché à formuler dans leur œuvre une « théologie négative ».

Chez Valéry, cette théologie de la négation s’incarne dans la figure de Monsieur Teste.

Benjamin explique : « Monsieur Teste est une personnification de l’intellect qui rappelle beaucoup le Dieu dont traite la théologie négative de Nicolas de Cues. Tout ce qu’on peut supposer savoir de Teste débouche sur la négation. »ii

Kafka, quant à lui, « n’a pas toujours échappé aux tentations du mysticisme »iii selon Benjamin, qui cite à ce sujet Soma Morgenstern : « Il règne chez Kafka, comme chez tous les fondateurs de religion, une atmosphère villageoise. »iv

Phrase bizarre et volontairement provocatrice, que Benjamin rejette immédiatement, après l’avoir citée : « Kafka aussi écrivait des paraboles, mais il n’était pas un fondateur de religion. »v

Kafka n’était donc pas un Moïse ou un Jésus.

Mais était-il au moins un petit peu prophète, ou pourrait-il passer pour l’apôtre gyrovague d’une religion tenue obscure, travaillant les âmes modernes dans les profondeurs ?

Peut-on suivre Willy Haas qui a décidé de lire l’ensemble de l’œuvre de Kafka à travers un prisme théologique ? « Dans son grand roman Le Château, Kafka a représenté la puissance supérieure, le règne de la grâce ; dans son roman Le Procès, qui n’est pas moins grand, il a représenté la puissance inférieure, le règne du jugement et de la damnation. Dans un troisième roman, L’Amérique, il a essayé de représenter, selon une stricte égalisation, la terre entre ces deux puissances […] la destinée terrestre et ses difficiles exigences. »vi

Kafka, peintre des trois mondes, le supérieur, l’inférieur et celui de l’entre-deux ?

L’opinion de W. Haas semble aussi « intenable » aux yeux de Benjamin. Il s’irrite lorsque Haas précise: « Kafka procède […] de Kierkegaard comme de Pascal, on peut bien l’appeler le seul descendant légitime de ces deux penseurs. On retrouve chez tous trois le même thème religieux de base, cruel et inflexible : l’homme a toujours tort devant Dieu. »vii

Kafka, judéo-janséniste ?

Non, dit Benjamin, gardien courroucé du Temple kafkaïen. Mais il ne précise cependant pas en quoi l’interprétation de Haas serait fautive.

Serait-ce que l’homme a toujours tort, mais pas nécessairement « devant Dieu » ? Alors devant qui ? Lui-même ?

Ou serait-ce que l’homme n’a pas toujours « tort », et donc qu’il a parfois raison, devant quelque comte Ouestouestviii que ce soit ?

Ou bien serait-ce qu’il n’ a en réalité ni tort ni raison, et que Dieu lui-même n’a ni torts ni raisons à son égard, parce qu’Il est déjà mort, ou bien alors indifférent, ou encore absent ?

On ne saurait dire. Walter Benjamin ne livre pas la réponse définitive, l’interprétation officielle de ce que pensait Kafka sur ces difficiles questions. Benjamin se contente, pour éclairer ce qu’il lui semble être la position kafkaïenne, de s’appuyer sur un « fragment de conversation » rapporté par Max Brod :

« Je me rappelle un entretien avec Kafka où nous étions partis de l’Europe actuelle et du déclin de l’humanité. ‘Nous sommes, disait-il, des pensées nihilistes, des idées de suicide, qui naissent dans l’esprit de Dieu’. Ce mot me fit aussitôt penser à la conception du monde des gnostiques. Mais il protesta : ‘Non, notre monde est simplement un acte de mauvaise humeur de la part de Dieu, un mauvais jour.’ Je répondis : ‘Ainsi en dehors de cette forme sous laquelle le monde nous apparaît, il y aurait de l’espoir ?’ Il sourit : ‘Oh ! Assez d’espoir, une quantité infinie d’espoir – mais pas pour nous.’ »ix

Dieu aurait-il donc des pensées suicidaires, par exemple comme Stefan Zweig à Pétropolis, vingt ans plus tard, en 1942 ? Mais à la différence de Zweig, Dieu ne semble pas s’être effectivement « suicidé », ou s’il l’a un peu fait, c’est seulement par procuration, par notre entremise en quelque sorte.

Il y a aussi à prendre en considération une autre interprétation, dont nous avons déjà un peu traitée dans ce Blog : Dieu pourrait ne s’être que seulement « contracté », ainsi que le formule la Kabbale d’Isaac Luria (concept de tsimtsoum), ou encore « évidé » Lui-même, selon l’expression de Paul (concept de kénose).

Kafka, paulinien et lourianique ?

Puisque nous en sommes réduits à l’exégèse imaginaire d’un écrivain qui n’était pas un « fondateur de religion », pouvons-nous supputer la probabilité que chaque mot tombé de la bouche de Franz Kafka compte réellement comme parole révélée, que toutes les tournures qu’il a choisies sont innocentes, et même que ce qu’il ne dit pas a peut-être plus de poids réel que ce qu’il semble dire ?

Notons que Kafka ne dit pas que les idées de suicide ou les pensées nihilistes naissant « dans l’esprit de Dieu » s’appliquent en fait à Lui-même. Ces idées naissent peut-être dans Son esprit, mais ensuite elles vivent de leur propre vie. Et cette vie ce sont les hommes qui la vivent, ce sont les hommes qui l’incarnent, ce sont les hommes qui sont (substantiellement) les pensées nihilistes ou les idées suicidaires de Dieu. Quand Dieu pense, ses idées se mettent ensuite à vivre sans Lui, et ce sont les hommes qui vivent de la vie de ces idées de néant et de mort, que Dieu a pu aussi une fois contempler, dans leurs ‘commencements’ (bereshit).

Des idées de mort, d’annihilation, d’auto-anéantissement, lorsqu’elles sont pensées par Dieu, « vivent » aussi absolument que des idées de vie éternelle, de gloire et de salut, – et cela malgré la contradiction ou l’oxymore que comporte l’idée abstraite d’une mort qui « vit » en tant qu’idée incarnée dans des hommes réels.

Pensées par Dieu, ces idées de mort et de néant vivent et prennent une forme humaine pour se perpétuer et s’auto-engendrer.

Cette interprétation de Kafka par lui-même, telle que rapportée par Max Brod, est-elle « tenable », ou du moins pas aussi « intenable » que celle de Willy Haas à propos de sa supposée « théologie » ? Peut-être. Mais il faut continuer l’enquête et les requêtes.

Comme dans les longues tirades auto-réflexives d’un K. converti à la métaphysique immanente du Château, on pourrait continuer encore et encore le questionnement.

Même si cela risque d’être hérétique aux yeux de Benjamin !

Peut-être que Max Brod n’a pas rapporté avec toute la précision souhaitable les expressions exactes employées par Kafka ?

Ou peut-être Kafka n’a-t-il pas mesuré lui-même toute la portée des mots qu’ils prononçait dans l’intimité d’un tête-à-tête avec son ami, sans se douter qu’un siècle plus tard nous serions nombreux à les commenter et à les interpréter, comme les pensées profondes d’un Kabbaliste ou d’un éminent juriste du Droit canon?

Je ne sais pas si je suis moi-même une sorte d’« idée », « pensée » par Dieu, une idée « suicidaire ou nihiliste », et si mon existence même est due à quelque mauvaise humeur divine.

Si je l’étais, je ne peux que constater, à la façon de Descartes, que cette « idée » ne me semble pas particulièrement nette, vibrante, brillant de mille feux en moi, bien qu’elle soit censée avoir germé dans l’esprit de Dieu même.

Je ne peux que constater que mon esprit, et les idées qu’il fait vivre, appartiennent encore au monde de l’obscur, du crépuscule, et non au monde de la nuit noire.

C’est en ce sens que je dois me séparer nettement de Paul Valéry, qui prophétisait quant à lui :

« Voici venir le Crépuscule du Vague et s’apprêter le règne de l’Inhumain qui naîtra de la netteté, de la rigueur et de la pureté dans les choses humaines. »x

Valéry associe (nettement) la netteté, la rigueur et la pureté à « l’Inhumain », – mais aussi par la magie logique de sa métaphore, à la Nuit.

J’imagine aussi que « l’Inhumain » est pour Valéry un autre nom de Dieu ?

Pour nous en convaincre, l’on peut se rapporter à un autre passage de Tel Quel, dans lequel Valéry avoue :

« Notre insuffisance d’esprit est précisément le domaine des puissances du hasard, des dieux et du destin. Si nous avions réponse à tout – j’entends réponse exacte – ces puissances n’existeraient pas. »xi

Du côté de l’insuffisance d’esprit, du côté du Vague et du crépusculaire, nous avons donc « les puissances du hasard, des dieux et du destin », c’est-à-dire à peu près tout ce qui forme la substance originaire du monde, pour des gens comme moi.

Mais du côté de l’ « exact », de la « netteté », de la « rigueur » et de la « pureté », nous avons « l’Inhumain », qui va désormais « régner dans les choses humaines », pour des gens comme Valéry.

Adieu aux dieux donc, ils appartenaient au soir couchant, que la langue latine appelle proprement « l’Occident » (et que la langue arabe appelle « Maghreb »).

S’ouvre maintenant la Nuit, où régnera l’Inhumain.

Merci Kafka, pour nous avoir donné à voir l’idée du Néant naître en Dieu et vivre en l’Homme.

Merci Valéry, pour nous avoir donné à voir la voie de l’Inhumain dans la Nuit qui s’annonce.

iWalter Benjamin. « Paul Valéry. Pour son soixantième anniversaire ». Œuvres complètes t. II, Gallimard, 2000, p. 322-329 , et « Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort ». Ibid. p. 410-453

iiWalter Benjamin. « Paul Valéry. Pour son soixantième anniversaire ». Œuvres complètes t. II, Gallimard, 2000, p. 325

iiiWalter Benjamin. « Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort ». Ibid. p. 430

ivWalter Benjamin. « Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort ». Ibid. p. 432

vWalter Benjamin. « Franz Kafka. Pour le dixième anniversaire de sa mort ». Ibid. p. 432-433

viW. Haas. op.cit., p.175, cité par W. Benjamin, in op. cit. p. 435

viiW. Haas. op.cit., p.176, cité par W. Benjamin, in op. cit. p. 436

viiiLe Comte Westwest (traduit ‘Ouestouest’ dans la version fraçaise) est le maître du Château de Kafka.

ixMax Brod. Der Dichter Franz Kafka. Die Neue Rundschau, 1921, p. 213. Cité par W. Benjamin in op. cit. p. 417

xPaul Valéry. Tel Quel. « Rhumbs ». Œuvres t. II. Paris, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de La Pléiade. 1960, p. 621

xiPaul Valéry. Tel Quel. « Rhumbs ». Œuvres t. II. Paris, Gallimard, Bibliothèque de La Pléiade. 1960, p. 647

Les prophètes « ridicules »


 

Kafka, dans une lettre à Max Brod sur les écrivains juifs allemands, dit que « le déchirement que [la question juive] suscitait était leur source d’inspiration. Source d’inspiration aussi respectable qu’une autre, mais révélant, à un examen plus attentif quelques tristes particularités. Tout d’abord, le moyen d’apaisement, en dépit des apparences, ne pouvait être la littérature allemande. » En effet, ils se trouvaient dès lors « au milieu de trois impossibilités (…) : l’impossibilité de ne pas écrire », puisque seule l’écriture pouvait les libérer, « l’impossibilité d’écrire en allemand », – car la langue allemande représentait l’« usurpation franche ou tacite, ou même auto-expiatoire d’une possession étrangère que l’on n’a pas gagnée mais volée, fugitivement, et qui reste possession étrangère même si l’on n’a pas pu y découvrir la plus unique faute de langage », enfin « l’impossibilité d’écrire autrement », car dans quelle autre langue auraient-ils pu choisir de s’exprimer ? Et Kafka de conclure : « On pourrait presque ajouter une quatrième impossibilité, l’impossibilité d’écrire, car leur déchirement n’était pas quelque chose qui pût être apaisé par l’écriture. »

Il était impossible d’écrire en allemand et impossible d’écrire dans quelque autre langue. Il était impossible de ne pas écrire, et impossible d’écrire. Complètement kafkaïen…

Le déchirement devenait « un ennemi du vivre et de l’écriture ; l’écriture n’était qu’un sursis, comme pour qui écrit son testament avant de mourir. »i

Kafka était seulement de dix ans plus âgé que Benjamin. Hannah Arendt remarque : « Le sionisme et le communisme étaient pour les Juifs de cette génération (…) les formes de rébellion dont ils disposaient – la génération des pères, il ne faut pas l’oublier, condamnant souvent plus durement la rébellion sioniste que la rébellion communiste. »ii Mais au temps où Benjamin prit « le chemin d’abord d’un sionisme peu convaincu, puis d’un communisme qui ne l’était au fond pas plus, les tenants des deux idéologies étaient opposés par l’hostilité la plus grande : les communistes traitaient pour les discréditer les sionistes de « fascistes juifs »iii et les sionistes appelaient les jeunes communistes juifs « assimilationnistes rouges ». D’une manière remarquable et probablement unique, Benjamin garda ouverte pour lui-même les deux routes pendant des années. »iv

Ce qui caractérise l’indécision de Walter Benjamin quant à son engagement dans le sionisme ou le marxisme, c’était « la conviction amère que toutes les solutions n’étaient pas seulement objectivement fausses et inadaptées à la réalité, mais qu’elles le conduiraient personnellement à un faux salut, que ce salut s’appelât Moscou ou Jérusalem. »

Presque un siècle plus tard, on peut juger qu’il était alors visionnaire de considérer Moscou comme un « faux-salut ». Mais Jérusalem ?

En 1931 Walter Benjamin écrivit à Gershom Scholem ces mots désespérés, si caractéristiques des « sombres temps » évoqués par Hannah Arendt : « Un naufragé qui dérive sur une épave, en grimpant à l’extrémité du mât, qui est déjà fendu. Mais il a une chance de donner de là-haut un signal de détresse. »v

Benjamin se considérait, à l’instar de Kafka, « mort de son vivant », état paradoxal à l’évidence, mais qui en faisait aussi, à ses yeux du moins, « l’authentique survivant ».vi

Quelle était l’essence du désespoir qui animait ainsi Kafka et Benjamin ? Hannah Arendt estime que c’était « l’insolubilité de la question juive, pour ceux de cette génération (…) Ce qui comptait davantage était qu’ils ne voulaient ni ne pouvaient revenir au judaïsme, non parce qu’ils croyaient au progrès et par suite à une disparition automatique de la haine à l’égard des Juifs, ou parce qu’ils s’estimaient trop « assimilés », trop éloignés du judaïsme originel, mais parce que toutes les traditions et cultures leur étaient devenues également problématiques. Et cela valait tout autant pour le « retour » au peuple juif proposé par les sionistes ; tous auraient pu dire ce que Kafka a dit un jour au sujet de son appartenance au peuple juif : ‘Mon peuple, à supposer que j’en aie unvii’. »viii

Mais ce n’était certes pas seulement la tradition juive qui était « la question décisive » pour Benjamin, non, c’était « la tradition en général »ix.

Aucune tradition ne pouvait plus désormais lui convenir, qu’elle soit juive, allemande, européenne, marxiste ou martienne…

Désespoir absolu, terminal. « Il se tient en fait au seuil du jugement dernier. »x

Sur ce seuil, il se tient seul, complètement seul. Mais sur ce même seuil, l’ont précédé avant lui tous les maîtres de « temps nouveaux », tous ceux qui voyaient aussi leur propre époque « comme un amas de décombres ». Hannah Arendt reprend en note, à propos de cette formule : «  A cet égard aussi, Baudelaire est le prédécesseur de Benjamin : « Le monde va finir. La seule raison pour laquelle il pouvait durer, c’est qu’il existe. Que cette raison est faible, comparée à toutes celles qui annoncent le contraire, particulièrement à celle-ci ; qu’est-ce que le monde a désormais à faire sous le ciel (…) Quant à moi qui sens quelquefois en moi le ridicule d’un prophète, je sais que je n’y trouverai jamais la charité d’un médecin. Perdu dans ce vilain monde, coudoyé par les foules, je suis comme un homme lassé dont l’œil ne voit en arrière, dans les années profondes, que désabusement et amertume, et devant lui qu’un orage où rien de neuf n’est contenu, ni enseignement ni douleur. » (Journaux intimes, éd. Pléiade, p. 1195-1197) »xi.

Et Hannah Arendt cite Brecht pour confirmer encore le point :

« Nous savons que nous sommes des précurseurs. Et après nous viendra : rien qui mérite d’être nommé. »xii

Puis elle cite à nouveau Benjamin :

« Au reste je ne me sens guère contraint de mettre en couplets, dans sa totalité, l’état du monde. Il y a déjà, sur cette planète, bien des civilisations qui ont péri dans le sang et l’horreur. Naturellement il faut lui souhaiter de vivre un jour une civilisation qui aura laissé les deux derrière elle – je suis même (…) enclin à supposer que la planète est en attente de cela. Mais savoir si nous pouvons déposer ce présent sur sa cente ou quatre cent millionième table d’anniversaire, c’est, en vérité, terriblement incertain. Et si cela n’arrive pas, elle nous punira finalement – pour nos compliments hypocrites – en nous servant le Jugement dernier. »xiii

Ces phrases écrites en 1935 montraient que Benjamin s’attendait à ce que « le sang et l’horreur » viennent à nouveau inonder notre planète. Peu d’années après, une petite place à la table du Jugement dernier lui fut accordé, pour ses mérites prophétiques.

Nul doute aujourd’hui encore que « le sang et l’horreur » vont continuer de fondre sur notre terre commune avant qu’un jour, dans cent ou quatre cent millions d’années, la paix enfin puisse régner éternellement.

Mais l’humanité est aujourd’hui, plus que jamais à la dérive. Elle est désormais privée de toute tradition, qu’elle soit juive, chrétienne, allemande, européenne, bouddhiste ou martienne.

Le sang coule encore et coulera sans doute à flots puissants lors des catastrophes sociales, politiques et écologiques qui se préparent.

Que faire ?

Nous n’aurons certainement pas le moyen, en tant qu’humanité privée de tout repère, de survivre encore cent millions d’années. Ni même un seul million d’années. Et peut-être pas même seulement dix mille ans.

La seule solution envisageable, c’est de fonder une nouvelle tradition, qui soit la somme totale, quoique fragmentaire, de toutes les traditions actuellement à l’agonie, ou dans un état de décomposition avancée.

La seule solution est de prélever en chacune d’elles les quelques fragments précieux d’espoir et de solidarité trans-humaine qui restent encore un tout petit peu en vie.

Et de faire de ces fragments une nouvelle pierre de fondation.

iKafka. Briefe, p.336-338, cité par Hannah Arendt, in Vies politiques. Ed. Gallimard, Paris, 1974, p.282-283

iiHannah Arendt. Vies politiques. Ed. Gallimard, Paris, 1974, p.285

iiiHannah Arendt place en note à propos de cette expression : « Ainsi Brecht a reproché à Benjamin d’avoir « favorisé le fascisme juif » par son étude sur Kafka. Cf. Essai sur Bertold Brecht, p.136

ivHannah Arendt. Vies politiques. Ed. Gallimard, Paris, 1974, p.286

vLettre de Walter Benjamin à Gershom Scholem du 17 avril 1931, citée par Hannah Arendt, in op. cit., p. 268.

viKafka note dans son Journal à la date du 19 octobre 1921 : «  Celui qui, vivant, ne vient pas à bout de la vie, a besoin d’une main pour écarter un peu le désespoir que lui cause son destin (…) mais de l’autre main, il peut écrire ce qu’il voit sous les décombres, car il voit autrement et plus de choses que les autres, n’est-il pas mort de son vivant, n’est-il pas l’authentique survivant ? ». Trad. M. Robert, Œuvres complètes, t. VI, p. 406, Cercle du Livre précieux, Paris, 1964. Cité par H. Arendt, in op. cit., p. 268.

viiBriefe, p.183.

viiiHannah Arendt. Vies politiques. Ed. Gallimard, Paris, 1974, p.288-289

ixIbid. p. 289

xW. Benjamin, dans son Essai sur Karl Kraus, cité par H. Arendt, in op. cit., p. 290.

xiHannah Arendt. Vies politiques. Ed. Gallimard, Paris, 1974, p.290, note 1.

xiiHannah Arendt. Vies politiques. Ed. Gallimard, Paris, 1974, p.290

xiiiLettre de Benjamin, datée de Paris en1935, citée par H. Arendt, in op. cit., p. 290-291.