The End of Knowledge


« Bhārata Natyam« 

In the Rig-Veda, the name Bhārata ( भारत ) designates the God Agni, and the sacred fire. It is a Sanskrit word of Vedic origin. Its root is bhar, « to carry ». Bhārata etymologically means the « carrier ».

Why is this? Because the fire of the sacrifice « carries » the offerings.

Bhārata is also the name of India in Sanskrit, the name of an emperor and that of the mythical author of famous treatises of the Theater, the Nâtya-shâstra and the Gītālamkāra .

René Daumal, who learned Sanskrit, made a remarkable effort to translate into French the texts of Bhārata, the playwright, using a beautiful and poetic language.

Bhārata tells the story of the birth of Knowledge and the origin of Flavor.

Kings, peoples, prophets, and even the Gods themselves, generally ignore what this Knowledge is all about, and they ignore this Flavor.

They all climb one after the other on the great stage of the world theater to utter some lines of relative brillance. But they speak without this Knowledge, without this Flavor.

The innate art of language is not natural to them. They certainly do not excel at it. They know nothing of the only true poetry.

Where is the essence of true poetry? In the Flavor of Life. In the Sapience of Taste.

Shortly before his death, Daumal gave the Cahiers du Sud a few poems with a Vedic touch:

« Into blind darkness enters

Those who are dedicated to the non-knowledge ;

Into even darker darkness

Those who are content with knowledge. » i

Neither breath, nor sight, nor hearing, nor thought are here of any help. We must get rid of them. We need to reach back to the ancient, to the original. To rise higher, to dive deep to the sources, to look for the Breath of the breath, the Sight of the sight, the Hearing of the hearing, the Thought of the thought.

The wise man will recognize what is meant here. Words are no longer in use. They make speech look weak.

Daumal, however, tried to reach out to us, beyond the lines, with words.

« We say that Knowledge is power and foresight. For the Hindu, it is ‘to become’, and to ‘be transformed’. » ii

Words, he taught, have a literal meaning, derived meanings, and more importantly, suggested meanings. It is the immense, loose and delicate universe of verbal « resonances » (dhvani), « suggestions » (vyanjanâ) and « tastes » (rasanâ).

The Flavor is a « conscious joy », even in pain, it is a knowledge that shines forth from its obviousness, it is the sister of the sacred.

Daumal asserts that « he who is capable of perceiving it, ‘tastes’ it, not as a separate thing, but as his own essence. » iii

Thus the poem becomes analogous to oneself. Its flavor is its own « self », its « essence », its « soul ».

Flavor has three functions: sweetness, which « liquefies the spirit »; ardor, which « sets it ablaze » and exalts it; and evidence, which « illuminates » it.

Daumal even asserts: « All the poems recited and all the songs, without exception, are portions of Vishnu, the Great Being, clothed in sound form »iv.

The poem is nothing but wind, if it does not set the whole world and the soul in motion, by sounds, senses, resonances, gait and loves.

Nothing Greek in this. No quiet light. No sea in the sun, no complicit nature. India is already far away, beyond all nature. In freedom, one might say, at last.

« I have settled in the heart of each being.

By Me, come and go memories and knowledge.

The purpose of all knowledge is I alone who am to know.

I am the author of the End of Knowledge.

I am the one who knows this Knowledge. » v

__________________

iLes Cahiers du Sud. Special issue 1941  » Message actuel de l’Inde « . Extract from Brihadâranyaka. IV. 4. 10-21. Translated by René Daumal.

iiBharata. René Daumal. Gallimard. 1970. To approach the Hindu poetic art.

iiiIbid.

ivIbid.

vBhagavad Gîtâ, 15, 15 (transl. Ph. Quéau)

Veda Without Desire


The poet is alone these days, and this world is filled with emptiness.

He still lives off past bonfires, yearning for ripe tongues, or future ones.

René Char, one day, invited « Aeschylus, Lao Tzu, the Presocratics, Teresa of Avila, Shakespeare, Saint-Just, Rimbaud, Hölderlin, Nietzsche, Van Gogh, Melville » to appear with him in on the cover of Fury and Mystery (1948). He also invited a few poets of centuries past, who had reached « incandescence and the unaltered ».

Given a choice, I would have added Homer, Tchouang-tseu, Zoroaster, Campanella, Donne, Hugo, Baudelaire, Jaurès, Gauguin, Bradbury.

Infinite, are the fine lines drawn in the memories.

Millions of billions of dream lines, multitudes of unique horizons. Each one has its own suave flavor, and each one reveals an awakening, setting one spirit ablaze with sparkle, another with blaze.

One day poets will be elected companions for every single moment.

They will weave the universe, and undress the Being:

« All the poems recited and all the songs without exception are portions of Vishnu, of the Great Being, clothed in a sonorous form.»i

René Daumal learned Sanskrit to translate the Veda and Upaniṣad into sincere and sounding words. Did he get the ‘incandescence’?

Hymn 69 of the Rig Veda was the first challenge to his fresh science:

« Arrow? No: against the bow is the thought that is posed.

A Calf being born? No, it is she who rushes to her mother’s udder;

Like a wide river she drags her course towards the headland…

In her own vows the liquid is launched.»ii

Daumal launched himself – like a liquid, during the rise of Nazism, into an ocean of metaphors, into the infinite Sanskrit sea, its cries, its hymns, all the breaths that emanate from its verses.

In the din of the times, he alone searched for the right words to sing the Bhagavad Gita, in a faithful, concise style:

« Roots up and branches down…

imperishable is called Açvattha.

The Metres are its leaves,

and whoever knows him knows Knowledge (the Veda).»iii

Emile-Louis Burnouf had proposed in 1861 a more laminated, fluid version of this same passage:

« He is a perpetual fig tree, an Açwattha,

that grows up its roots, down its branches,

and whose leaves are poems:

he who knows it, knows the Veda. »

 

Who is the Açwattha, who is this « fig tree »? The fig tree is an image of the Blessed (Bhagavad).

Who is the Blessed One? Burnouf indicates that it is Krishna, the 10th incarnation of Vishnu.

In the Katha-Upaniṣad, we again find the image of the fig tree, – this time associated with the brahman :

« Roots above, branches below…

is this evergreen fig tree,

he’s the shining one, he’s the brahman,

he who is called immortal,

on him lean all the worlds,

no one gets past him.

This is that. »iv

 

Who are these « Blessed » (Bhagavad ), of whom the fig tree is but an image?

The Taittirîya-Upaniṣad offers the following explanation.

Take a young man, good, quick, strong, educated in the Veda, and possessing the whole earth and all its riches. That is the only human bliss.

One hundred human bliss is only one Gandharva bliss.

One hundred bliss of Gandharva are one bliss of the gods born since creation.

The Upaniṣad thus continues the progression, with a multiplicative factor of 100 at each stage, evoking the bliss of the gods, then the bliss of Indra, then the bliss of Brihaspati, then the bliss of Prajāpati, and finally, the bliss of the brahman.

The gist of the Upaniṣad is in its conclusion:

The bliss of the brahman is similar to that of « the man who knows the Veda, unaffected by desire.»

 

 

iRené Daumal. Pour approcher l’art poétique Hindou, Cahiers du Sud, 1942

ii« Flèche ? Non : contre l’arc c’est la pensée qui est posée.

Veau qu’on délivre ? Non, c’est elle qui s’élance au pis de sa mère ;

Comme un large fleuve elle trait vers la pointe son cours

Dans ses propre vœux le liquide est lancé. »

iiiBhagavad Gîta 15, 1. Transl. René Daumal :

« Racines-en-haut et branches-en-bas,

impérissable on dit l’Açvattha.

Les Mètres sont ses feuilles,

et qui le connaît connaît le Savoir (le Véda). »

Emile-Louis Burnouf’ s translation (1861):

« Il est un figuier perpétuel, un açwattha,

qui pousse en haut ses racines, en bas ses rameaux,

et dont les feuilles sont des poèmes :

celui qui le connaît, connaît le Veda. »

ivKatha-Upanishad 2, 3

Le Véda sans désir


Le poète est seul, de nos jours. Il manque au monde. Il le comble aussi, en quelque manière, par le vide.

Le poète vit des brasiers passés, des brûlures, et il aspire à des langues mûres, nécessairement futures.

René Char, un jour, invita « Eschyle, Lao-Tseu, les présocratiques grecs, Thérèse d’Avila, Shakespeare, Saint-Just, Rimbaud, Hölderlin, Nietzsche, Van Gogh, Melville » à paraître avec lui dans le bandeau de Fureur et mystère (1948).

Il convia en sa compagnie quelque poètes multiséculaires, parvenus « à l’incandescence et à l’inaltéré ».

D’autres noms auraient pu être élus. Homère, Tchouang-tseu, Zoroastre, Campanella, Donne, Hugo, Baudelaire, Jaurès, Gauguin, Bradbury.

Infinies, les fines autres lignes dessinées dans les mémoires.

Millions de milliards de lignes rêvées, multitudes d’horizons uniques. Chacune a sa suave saveur, et chacune révèle un éveil, embrase un esprit d’un scintillement, un autre d’un flamboiement.

Un jour les poètes seront compagnons de tout voyage.

Tous, ils tissent l’univers, ils déshabillent l’Être :

« Tous les poèmes récités et tous les chants sans exception, ce sont des portions de Vishnu, du Grand Être, revêtu d’une forme sonore. »i

René Daumal apprit le sanskrit pour traduire, en mots sincères et sonnants, les Védas et les Upanishads. Obtint-il l’incandescence ?

L’Hymne 69 du Rig Veda fut le premier défi à sa fraîche science :

« Flèche ? Non : contre l’arc c’est la pensée qui est posée.

Veau qu’on délivre ? Non, c’est elle qui s’élance au pis de sa mère ;

Comme un large fleuve elle trait vers la pointe son cours

Dans ses propre vœux le liquide est lancé. »

Daumal – comme un liquide – s’est lancé seul, pendant la montée du nazisme, dans l’océan des métaphores, dans l’infini sanskrit, ses cris, ses hymnes, les souffles qui en émanent.

Dans le fracas des temps, il cherchait seul des mots justes pour dire la Bhagavad Gîta, dans un style fidèle, concis :

« Racines-en-haut et branches-en-bas,

impérissable on dit l’Açvattha.

Les Mètres sont ses feuilles,

et qui le connaît connaît le Savoir (le Véda). »ii

 

Emile-Louis Burnouf avait proposé en 1861 une version plus laminée, fluide de ce passage:

« Il est un figuier perpétuel, un açwattha,

qui pousse en haut ses racines, en bas ses rameaux,

et dont les feuilles sont des poèmes :

celui qui le connaît, connaît le Veda. »

 

Qui est l’açwattha, qui est ce « figuier » ? Le figuier est une image du Bienheureux (Bhagavad).

Qui est le Bienheureux ? Burnouf indique que c’est Krishna, la 10ème incarnation de Vishnou.

Dans la Katha-Upanishad, on trouve à nouveau l’image du figuier, – associé cette fois au brahman :

« Racines en-haut, branches en-bas

est ce figuier éternel,

c’est lui le resplendissant, lui le brahman,

lui qui est appelé immortel,

sur lui s’appuient tous les mondes,

nul ne passe par-delà lui.

Ceci est cela. »iii

 

Qui sont vraiment ces « Bienheureux » (Bhagavad ), dont le figuier n’est qu’une image?

La Taittirîya-Upanishad propose cette explication.

Prenez un jeune homme, bon, rapide, fort, instruit dans le Véda, et possédant la terre entière et toutes ses richesses. Voilà l’unique félicité humaine.

Cent félicités humaines ne sont qu’une seule félicité de Gandharva.

Cent félicités de Gandharva sont une seule félicité des dieux nés depuis la création.

L’Upanishad continue ainsi la progression, avec un facteur multiplicatif de 100 à chaque étape, en évoquant le bonheur des dieux, puis la joie d’Indra, puis celle de Brihaspati, puis le ravissement de Prajâpati, et enfin : brahman.

Mais c’est la conclusion de l’Upanishad qui possède tout le sel.

La félicité même du brahman, est semblable à celle de « l’homme versé dans le Véda, et non affecté par le désir. »

i René Daumal. Pour approcher l’art poétique Hindou, Cahiers du Sud, 1942

iiBhagavad Gîta (le Chant du Bienheureux). Ch. 15, 1ère strophe. Trad. René Daumal

iiiKatha-Upanishad. 2ème Lecture, Liane 3

Un homme sans désir


Le poète est assez seul, de nos jours. Il manque au monde, et par ce vide signifié, il le comble en quelque manière.

Le poète seul vit des brasiers passés, il rêve aux brûlures, il aspire aux langues futures.

René Char se sentit un jour assez seul pour inviter « Eschyle, Lao-Tseu, les présocratiques grecs, Thérèse d’Avila, Shakespeare, Saint-Just, Rimbaud, Hölderlin, Nietzsche, Van Gogh, Melville » à paraître avec lui dans le bandeau de Fureur et mystère (1948). Il convie des poètes multiséculaires, parce qu’ils sont, dit-il, parvenus « à l’incandescence et à l’inaltéré ».

On pourrait à notre tour poser des noms séculaires, pour donner le change. Homère, Tchouang-tseu, Zoroastre, Campanella, Donne, Chateaubriand, Baudelaire, Jaurès, Gauguin, Bradbury.

Ce serait là une fine autre ligne dessinée dans l’horizon des mémoires.

Il y aura un jour des millions de milliards, de lignes rêvées, des multitudes d’horizons uniques. Chacune aura sa suave saveur, et chacun révélera un éveil, l’une embrasera tel esprit d’un scintillement, l’autre d’un flamboiement.

Un jour tous les poètes seront compagnons du grand voyage.

Tous, nous saurons qu’ils tissent le même univers, qu’ils déshabillent l’Être : « Tous les poèmes récités et tous les chants sans exception, ce sont des portions de Vishnu, du Grand Être, revêtu d’une forme sonore. »i

René Daumal apprit le sanskrit pour traduire, en poète sincère et résonant, les Védas ou les Upanishads. Arriva-t-il à ses fins ? Obtint-il l’incandescence ?

L’Hymne 69 du Rig Veda fut le premier défi à sa fraîche science :

« Flèche ? Non : contre l’arc c’est la pensée qui est posée.

Veau qu’on délivre ? Non, c’est elle qui s’élance au pis de sa mère ;

Comme un large fleuve elle trait vers la pointe son cours

Dans ses propre vœux le liquide est lancé. »

Daumal – comme un liquide – s’est lancé seul, pendant la montée du nazisme, dans l’océan des métaphores, dans l’infini d’une langue morte encore vivante, dans ses cris, dans ses hymnes, dans tous les souffles qui en émanent encore. Il continua, seul encore, pendant la 2ème Guerre Mondiale.

Dans le fracas des temps, ce poète seul cherchait des mots pour traduire la Bhagavad Gîta, dans un style heurté, fidèle, concis :

« Racines-en-haut et branches-en-bas,

impérissable on dit l’Açvattha.

Les Mètres sont ses feuilles,

et qui le connaît connaît le Savoir (le Véda). »ii

 

Emile-Louis Burnouf avait proposé en 1861 une version plus laminée, fluide de ce passage:

« Il est un figuier perpétuel, un açwattha,

qui pousse en haut ses racines, en bas ses rameaux,

et dont les feuilles sont des poèmes :

celui qui le connaît, connaît le Veda. »

 

Qui est l’açwattha, qui est ce « figuier » ? Le figuier est une image du Bienheureux (Bhagavad).

Qui est le Bienheureux ? Burnouf indique que c’est Krishna, la 10ème incarnation de Vishnou.

Dans la Katha-Upanishad, on trouve à nouveau l’image du figuier, – associé cette fois au brahman :

« Racines en-haut, branches en-bas

est ce figuier éternel,

c’est lui le resplendissant, lui le brahman,

lui qui est appelé immortel,

sur lui s’appuient tous les mondes,

nul ne passe par-delà lui.

Ceci est cela. »iii

Krishna ou le brahman partagent l’état des « Bienheureux ».

Mais qu’entend-on réellement par la félicité (ânanda) de ces « Bienheureux »?

La Taittirîya-Upanishad propose une image à ce sujet.

Prenez un jeune homme, bon, rapide, fort, instruit dans le Véda, et possédant la terre entière et toutes ses richesses. Voilà l’unique félicité humaine.

Cent félicités humaines ne sont qu’une seule félicité de Gandharva. Cent félicités de Gandharva sont une seule félicité des dieux nés depuis la création. Et l’Upanishad continue d’énumérer des niveaux croissants de félicité, avec un facteur multiplicatif de 100 à chaque étape, en évoquant successivement celle dieux en acte, puis celle d’Indra, de Brihaspati, de Prajâpati, et enfin du brahman.

L’Upanishad conclut : la félicité ressentie par tous ces Dieux, y compris la félicité du brahman, est de même nature que celle de « l’homme versé dans le Véda, et non affecté par le désir. »

 

i René Daumal. Pour approcher l’art poétique Hindou, Cahiers du Sud, 1942

iiBhagavad Gîta (le Chant du Bienheureux). Ch. 15, 1ère strophe. Trad. René Daumal

iiiKatha-Upanishad. 2ème Lecture, Liane 3