What The Hidden God Does Reveal


« Cyrus the Great. The First Man the Bible calls the Messiah ».


Taken together, the Self, the inner being, hidden in its abyss, under several veils, and the Ego, the outer being, filled with sensations, thoughts, feelings, vibrating with the life of circumstances and contingencies, offer the image of a radical duality.
This constitutive, intrinsic duality is analogous, it seems to me, to that of the God who ‘hides’ Himself, but who nevertheless reveals Himself in some way, and sometimes lets Himself be seen (or understood).
This is a very ancient (human) experience of the divine. Far from presenting Himself to man in all His glory, God certainly hides Himself, everywhere, all the time, and in many ways.
There are indeed many ways for Him to let Himself be hidden.
But how would we know that God exists, if He were always, irremediably, hidden?
First of all, the Jewish Scriptures, and not the least, affirm that He is, and that He is hidden. Isaiah proclaims:
Aken attah El misttatter. אָכֵן, אַתָּה אֵל מִסְתַּתֵּר .

Word for word: « Truly, You, hidden God » i.

Moreover, though admittedly a negative proof, it is easy to see how many never see Him, always deny Him, and ignore Him without remorse.
But, although very well hidden, God is discovered, sometimes, it is said, to the pure, to the humble, and also to those who ‘really’ seek Him.


Anecdotes abound on this subject, and they must be taken for what they are worth. Rabindranath Tagore wrote: « There was a curious character who came to see me from time to time and used to ask all sorts of absurd questions. Once, for example, he asked me, ‘Have you ever seen God, Sir, with your own eyes?’ And when I had to answer him in the negative, he said that he had seen Him. ‘And what did you see?’ I asked. – ‘He was agitated, convulsing and pulsating before my eyes’, he answered.» ii


I liked this last sentence, at first reading, insofar as the divine seemed to appear here (an undeniable innovation), not as a noun, a substance, or any monolithic or monotheistic attribute, but in the form of three verbs, knotted together – ‘agitate’, ‘convulse’, ‘palpitate’.


Unfortunately, either in metaphysical irony or as a precaution against laughter, the great Tagore immediately nipped this embryonic, agitated, convulsive and palpitating image of divinity in the bud in the very next sentence, inflicting on the reader a brief and Jesuitical judgment: « You can imagine that we were not interested in engaging in deep discussions with such an individual. » iii


For my part, on the contrary, I could not imagine that.
It is certain that, whatever it may be, the deep « nature », the « essence » of God, is hidden much more often than it shows itself or lets itself be found.

About God, therefore, the doubt lasts.
But, from time to time, sparks fly. Fires blaze. Two hundred and fifty years before the short Bengali theophany just mentioned, Blaise Pascal dared a revolutionary and anachronistic (pre-Hegelian and non-materialist) dialectic, of the ‘and, and’ type. He affirmed that « men are at the same time unworthy of God and capable of God: unworthy by their corruption, capable by their first nature » iv.


Man: angel and beast.

The debate would be very long, and very undecided.
Excellent dialectician, Pascal specified, very usefully:
« Instead of complaining that God has hidden himself, you will give him thanks that he has discovered himself so much; and you will give him thanks again that he has not discovered himself to the superb wise men, unworthy of knowing a God so holy. » v
Sharp as a diamond, the Pascalian sentence never makes acceptance of the conveniences and the clichés, of the views of the PolitBuro of all obediences, and of the religious little marquis.
Zero tolerance for any arrogance, any smugness, in these transcendent subjects, in these high matters.
On the other hand, what a balance, on the razor blade, between extremes and dualisms, not to blunt them, but to exacerbate them, to magnify them:
« If there were no darkness man would not feel his corruption, if there were no light man would not hope for a remedy, so it is not only right, but useful for us that God be hidden in part and discovered in part since it is equally dangerous for man to know God without knowing his misery, and to know his misery without knowing God. » vi
This is not all. God makes it clear that He is hiding. That seems to be His strategy. This is how He wants to present Himself, in His creation and with man, with His presence and with His absence…
« That God wanted to hide himself.
If there were only one religion, God would be very obvious. Likewise, if there were only martyrs in our religion.

God being thus hidden, any religion which does not say that God is hidden is not true, and any religion which does not give the reason for it is not instructive. Ours does all this. Vere tu es deus absconditus.vii« 


Here, Pascal quotes Isaiah in Latin. « Truly, You are a hidden God. »
Deus absconditus.

I prefer, for my part, the strength of Hebrew sound: El misttatter.

How would we have known that God was hidden if Scripture had not revealed Him?
The Scripture certainly reveals Him, in a clear and ambiguous way.
« It says in so many places that those who seek God will find him. It does not speak of this light as the day at noon. It is not said that those who seek the day at noon, or water in the sea, will find it; and so it is necessary that the evidence of God is not such in nature; also it tells us elsewhere: Vere tu es Deus absconditus. » viii
Absconditus in Latin, misttatter in Hebrew, caché in French.

But, in the Greek translation of this verse of Isaiah by the seventy rabbis of Alexandria, we read:

σὺ γὰρ εἶ θεός, καὶ οὐκ ᾔδειμεν
Su gar eï theos, kai ouk êdeimen.

Which litterally means: « Truly You are God, and we did not know it »… A whole different perspective appears, then. Languages inevitably bring their own veils.
How do we interpret these variations? The fact that we do not know whether God is ‘really God’, or whether He is ‘really hidden’, does not necessarily imply that He might not really be God, or that He will always be hidden.
Pascal states that if God has only appeared once, the chances are that He is always in a position to appear again, when He pleases.
But did He appear only once? Who can say with absolute certainty?
On the other hand, if He really never appeared to any man, then yes, we would be justified in making the perfectly reasonable observation that the divinity is indeed ‘absent’, and we would be led to make the no less likely hypothesis that it will remain so. But this would not prevent, on the other hand, that other interpretations of this absence could be made, such as that man is decidedly unworthy of the divine presence (hence his absence), or even that man is unworthy of the consciousness of this absence.


Now Pascal, for his part, really saw God, – he saw Him precisely on Monday, November 23, 1654, from half past ten in the evening to half past midnight. « Fire. God of Abraham, God of Isaac, God of Jacob, not God of the philosophers and scholars. Certainty. Certainty. Feeling. Joy. Peace. God of Jesus Christ. » ix
This point being acquired (why put in doubt this writing of Pascal, discovered after his death, and sewn in the lining of his pourpoint?), one can let oneself be carried along by the sequences, the deductions and the exercise of reason that Pascal himself proposes.


« If nothing of God had ever appeared, this eternal deprivation would be equivocal, and could just as well refer to the absence of any divinity as to the unworthiness of men to know it; but the fact that he appears sometimes, and not always, removes the equivocation. If he appears once, he is always; and thus one cannot conclude anything except that there is a God, and that men are unworthy of him» x.
Pascal’s reasoning is tight, impeccable. How can one not follow it and approve its course? It must be admitted: either God has never appeared on earth or among men, or He may have appeared at least once or a few times.
This alternative embodies the ‘tragic’ question, – a ‘theatrical’ question on the forefront of the world stage…
One must choose. Either the total and eternal absence and disappearance of God on earth, since the beginning of time, or a few untimely divine appearances, a few rare theophanies, reserved for a few chosen ones…


In all cases, God seemed to have left the scene of the world since His last appearance, or to have decided never to appear again, thus putting in scene His deliberate absence. But, paradoxically, the significance of this absence had not yet been perceived, and even less understood, except by a tiny handful of out-of-touch thinkers, for whom, in the face of this absence of God, « no authentic human value has any more necessary foundation, and, on the other hand, all non-values remain possible and even probable. » xi
A Marxist and consummate dialectician, Lucien Goldmann, devoted his thesis to the ‘hidden god’. He established a formal link between the theophany staged by Isaiah, and the ‘tragic vision’ incarnated by Racine, and Pascal.
« The voice of God no longer speaks to man in an immediate way. Here is one of the fundamental points of the tragic thought. Vere tu es Deus absconditus‘, Pascal will write. » xii
Pascal’s quotation of the verse from Isaiah will be taken up several times by Goldmann, like an antiphon, and even in the title of his book.
« Deus absconditus. Hidden God. Fundamental idea for the tragic vision of God, and for Pascal’s work in particular (…): God is hidden from most men but he is visible to those he has chosen by granting them grace. » xiii


Goldmann interprets Pascal in his own strictly ‘dialectical’ way. He rejects any reading of Pascal according to binary oppositions ‘either…or…’. « This way of understanding the idea of the hidden God would be false and contrary to the whole of Pascalian thought which never says yes or no but always yes and no. The hidden God is for Pascal a God who is present and absent and not present sometimes and absent sometimes; but always present and always absent. » xiv
The constant presence of opposites and the work of immanent contradiction demand it. And this presence of opposites is itself a very real metaphor for the absent presence (or present absence) of the hidden God.
« The being of the hidden God is for Pascal, as for the tragic man in general, a permanent presence more important and more real than all empirical and sensible presences, the only essential presence. A God always absent and always present, that is the center of tragedy. » xv


But what does ‘always present and always absent‘ really mean?
This is the ‘dialectical’ answer of a Marxist thinker tackling the (tragic) theophany of absence, – as seen by the prophet Isaiah, and by Pascal.
In this difficult confrontation with such unmaterialist personalities, Goldmann felt the need to call to the rescue another Marxist, Georg von Lucàcs, to support his dialectical views on the absent (and present) God.
« In 1910, without thinking of Pascal, Lucàcs began his essay: ‘Tragedy is a game, a game of man and his destiny, a game in which God is the spectator. But he is only a spectator, and neither his words nor his gestures are ever mixed with the words and gestures of the actors. Only his eyes rest on them’. xvi

To then pose the central problem of all tragic thought: ‘Can he still live, the man on whom God’s gaze has fallen?’ Is there not incompatibility between life and the divine presence? » xvii


It is piquant to see a confirmed Marxist make an implicit allusion to the famous passage in Exodus where the meeting of God and Moses on Mount Horeb is staged, and where the danger of death associated with the vision of the divine face is underlined.
It is no less piquant to see Lucàcs seeming to confuse (is this intentional?) the ‘gaze of God’ falling on man with the fact that man ‘sees the face’ of God…
It is also very significant that Lucàcs, a Marxist dialectician, combines, as early as 1910, an impeccable historical materialism with the storm of powerful inner tensions, of deep spiritual aspirations, going so far as to affirm the reality of the ‘miracle’ (for God alone)…

What is perhaps even more significant is that the thought of this Hungarian Jew, a materialist revolutionary, seems to be deeply mixed with a kind of despair as to the human condition, and a strong ontological pessimism, tempered with a putative openness towards the reality of the divine (miracle)…
« Daily life is an anarchy of chiaroscuro; nothing is ever fully realized, nothing reaches its essence… everything flows, one into the other, without barriers in an impure mixture; everything is destroyed and broken, nothing ever reaches the authentic life. For men love in existence what it has of atmospheric, of uncertain… they love the great uncertainty like a monotonous and sleepy lullaby. They hate all that is univocal and are afraid of it (…) The man of the empirical life never knows where his rivers end, because where nothing is realized everything remains possible (…) But the miracle is realization (…) It is determined and determining; it penetrates in an unforeseeable way in the life and transforms it in a clear and univocal account. He removes from the soul all its deceptive veils woven of brilliant moments and vague feelings rich in meaning; drawn with hard and implacable strokes, the soul is thus in its most naked essence before his gaze. »
And Lucàcs to conclude, in an eminently unexpected apex: « But before God the miracle alone is real. » xviii

Strange and provocative sentence, all the more mysterious that it wants to be materialist and dialectic…


Does Lucàcs invite man to consider history (or revolution) as a miracle that he has to realize, like God? Or does he consider historical materialism as the miraculous unfolding of something divine in man?
Stranger still is Lucien Goldmann’s commentary on this sentence of Lucàcs:
« We can now understand the meaning and importance for the tragic thinker and writer of the question: ‘Can the man on whom God’s gaze has fallen still live?’» xix

But, isn’t the classic question rather: ‘Can the man who looks up to God still live?
Doesn’t Lucàcs’ new, revised question, taken up by Goldmann, imply a univocal answer ? Such as : – ‘For man to live, God must be hidden’ or even, more radically: ‘For man to live, God must die’.
But this last formulation would undoubtedly sound far too ‘Christian’…

In the end, can God really ‘hide’ or a fortiori can He really ‘die’?
Are these words, ‘hide’, ‘die’, really compatible with a transcendent God?
Is Isaiah’s expression, ‘the hidden God’ (El misttatter), clear, univocal, or does it itself hide a universe of less apparent, more ambiguous meanings?
A return to the text of Isaiah is no doubt necessary here. In theory, and to be complete, it would also be necessary to return to other religious traditions, even more ancient than the Jewish one, which have also dealt with the theme of the hidden god (or the unknown god), notably the Vedic tradition and that of ancient Egypt.
The limits of this article do not allow it. Nevertheless, it must be said emphatically that the intuition of a ‘hidden god’ is probably as old as humanity itself.
However, it must be recognized that Isaiah has, from the heart of Jewish tradition, strongly and solemnly verbalized the idea of the ‘hidden God’, while immediately associating it with that of the ‘saving God’.
 אָכֵן, אַתָּה אֵל מִסְתַּתֵּר–אֱלֹהֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל, מוֹשִׁיעַ. 
Aken attah, El misttatter – Elohai Israel, mochi’a.
« Truly, You, hidden God – God of Israel, Savior. » xx
A few centuries after Isaiah, the idea of the God of Israel, ‘hidden’ and ‘savior’, became part of the consciousness called, perhaps too roughly, ‘Judeo-Christian’.
It is therefore impossible to understand the semantic value of the expression « hidden God » without associating it with « God the savior », in the context of the rich and sensitive inspiration of the prophet Isaiah.
Perhaps, moreover, other metaphorical, anagogical or mystical meanings are still buried in Isaiah’s verses, so obviously full of a sensitive and gripping mystery?


Shortly before directly addressing the ‘hidden God’ and ‘savior’, Isaiah had reported the words of the God of Israel addressing the Persian Cyrus, – a key figure in the history of Israel, at once Persian emperor, savior of the Jewish people, figure of the Messiah, and even, according to Christians, a prefiguration of Christ. This last claim was not totally unfounded, at least on the linguistic level, for Cyrus is clearly designated by Isaiah as the « Anointed » (mochi’a)xxi of the Lord. Now the Hebrew word mochi’a is translated precisely as christos, ‘anointed’ in Greek, and ‘messiah‘ in English.


According to Isaiah, this is what God said to His ‘messiah’, Cyrus:
« I will give you treasures (otserot) in darkness (ḥochekh), and hidden (misttarim) riches (matmunei) , that you may know that I am YHVH, calling you by your name (chem), – the God of Israel (Elohai Israel). » xxii


Let us note incidentally that the word matmunei, ‘riches’, comes from the verb טָמַן, taman, ‘to hide, to bury’, as the verse says: « all darkness (ḥochekh) bury (tamun) his treasures » xxiii.
We thus learn that the ‘treasures’ that Isaiah mentions in verse 45:3, are triply concealed: they are in ‘darkness’, they are ‘buried’ and they are ‘hidden’…


The accumulation of these veils and multiple hiding places invites us to think that such well hidden treasures are only ever a means, a pretext. They hide in their turn, in reality, the reason, even more profound, for which they are hidden…


These treasures are perhaps hidden in the darkness and they are carefully buried, so that Cyrus sees there motivation to discover finally, he the Anointed One, what it is really necessary for him to know. And what he really needs to know are three names (chem), revealed to him, by God… First the unspeakable name, ‘YHVH’, then the name by which YHVH will henceforth call Cyrus, (a name which is not given by Isaiah), and finally the name Elohéï Israel (‘God of Israel’).

As for us, what we are given to know is that the ‘hidden God’ (El misttatter) is also the God who gives Cyrus ‘hidden riches’ (matmunei misttarim).
The verbal root of misttatter and misttarim is סָתַר, satar. In the Hithpael mode, this verb takes on the meaning of ‘to hide’, as in Is 45:15, « You, God, hide yourself », or ‘to become darkened’, as in Is 29:14, « And the mind will be darkened ».

In the Hiphil mode, the verb satar, used with the word panim, ‘face’, takes on the meaning of ‘covering the face’, or ‘turning away the face’, opening up other moral, mystical or anagogical meanings.
We find satar and panim associated in the verses: « Moses covered his face » (Ex 3:6), « God turned away his face » (Ps 10:11), « Turn away your face from my sins » (Ps 51:11), « Do not turn away your face from me » (Ps 27:9), « Your sins make him turn his face away from you » (Is 59:2).

Note that, in the same verbal mode, satar can also take on the meaning of « to protect, to shelter », as in: « Shelter me under the shadow of your wings » (Ps 17:8).
In biblical Hebrew, there are at least a dozen verbal roots meaning « to hide » xxiv , several of which are associated with meanings evoking material hiding places (such as « to bury », « to preserve », « to make a shelter »). Others, rarer, refer to immaterial hiding places or shelters and meanings such as ‘keep’, ‘protect’.
Among this abundance of roots, the verbal root satar offers precisely the particularityxxv of associating the idea of « hiding place » and « secret » with that of « protection », carried for example by the word sétèr: « You are my protection (sétèr) » (Ps 32:7); « He who dwells under the protection (sétèr) of the Most High, in the shadow (tsèl) of the Almighty » (Ps 91:1).xxvi


Isaiah 45:15, « Truly, You, the hidden God, » uses the verbal root satar for the word « hidden » (misttatter). Satar thus evokes not only the idea of a God « who hides » but also connotes a God « who protects, shelters » and « saves » (from the enemy or from affliction).
Thus we learn that the God « who hides » is also the God « who reveals ». And, what He reveals of His Self does « save ».

_________________________


iIs 45, 15

iiRabindranath Tagore. Souvenirs. 1924. Gallimard. Knowledge of the Orient, p. 185

iiiRabindranath Tagore. Souvenirs. 1924. Gallimard. Knowledge of the Orient, p. 185

ivPascal. Thoughts. Fragment 557. Edition by Léon Brunschvicg. Paris, 1904

vPascal. Thoughts. Fragment 288. Edition by Léon Brunschvicg. Paris, 1904

viPascal. Thoughts. Fragment 586. Edition by Léon Brunschvicg. Paris, 1906

viiPascal. Thoughts. Fragment 585. Edition by Léon Brunschvicg. Paris, 1904

viiiPascal. Thoughts. Fragment 242. Edition by Léon Brunschvicg. Paris, 1904

ixPascal. Memorial. In Pensées, Edition by Léon Brunschvicg. Paris, 1904, p.4

xPascal. Thoughts. Fragment 559. Edition by Léon Brunschvicg. Paris, 1904

xiLucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 44. Expressions in italics are by the author.

xiiLucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 45

xiiiLucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 46

xivLucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 46. Expressions in italics are by the author.

xvLucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 46-47. Expressions in italics are by the author.

xviLucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 46-47. Expressions in italics are by the author.

xviiLucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 47

xviiiGeorg von Lucàcs. Die Seele und dir Formen. p. 328-330, quoted in Lucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 48-49

xixLucien Goldmann. The Hidden God. Study on the tragic vision in Pascal’s Pensées and in Racine’s theater. Gallimard. 1955, p. 49

xxIs 45,15

xxi« Thus says the LORD to his Anointed, to Cyrus, Is 45:1.

xxiiוְנָתַתִּי לְךָ אוֹצְרוֹת חֹשֶׁךְ, וּמַטְמֻנֵי מִסְתָּרִים: לְמַעַן תֵּדַע, כִּי-אֲנִי יְהוָה הַקּוֹרֵא בְשִׁמְךָ–אֱלֹהֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל . (Is 45.3)

xxiiiJob 20.26

xxivIt would be out of place to make an exhaustive analysis of this in this article, but we will return to it later. The roots in question are as follows: חבא, חבה, טמן ,כּחד,כּסה, נצר, כּפר, סכךְ, סתם, סתר, עמם, עלם. They cover a wide semantic spectrum: ‘to hide, to hide, to bury, to cover, to cover, to keep, to guard, to protect, to preserve, to make a shelter, to close, to keep secret, to obscure, to be obscure’.

xxvAs well as the verbal roots צפן and סכךְ, although these have slightly different nuances.

xxviIt would be indispensable to enter into the depths of the Hebrew language in order to grasp all the subtlety of the semantic intentions and the breadth of the metaphorical and intertextual evocations that are at stake. Only then is it possible to understand the ambivalence of the language, which is all the more amplified in the context of divine presence and action. The same verbal root (tsur) indeed evokes both ‘enemy’ and ‘protection’, ‘fight’ and ‘shelter’, but also subliminally evokes the famous ‘rock’ (tsur) in the cleft of which God placed Moses to ‘protect’ him when He appeared to him in His glory on Mount Horeb. « I will place you in the cleft of the rock (tsur) and I will shelter you (or hide you, – verb שָׂכַךֽ sakhakh) from my ‘hand’ (kaf, literally, from my ‘hollow’) until I have passed over. « (Ex 33:22) For example, puns and alliterations proliferate in verse 7 of Psalm 32. Just after the first hemisphere ‘You are my protection (attah seter li)’, we read: מִצַּר תִּצְּרֵנִי , mi-tsar ti-tsre-ni (« from the enemy, or from affliction, you save me »). There is here a double alliteration playing on the phonetic proximity of the STR root of the word sétèr (‘protection’), of the TSR root of the word tsar, denoting the enemy or affliction, and of the tsar verb ‘to protect, guard, save’. This is not just an alliteration, but a deliberate play on words, all derived from the verbal root צוּר , tsour, ‘to besiege, fight, afflict; to bind, enclose’: – the word צַר, tsar, ‘adversary, enemy; distress, affliction; stone’; – the word צוּר , tsur, ‘rock, stone’; – the verb צָרַר, tsar, ‘to bind, envelop, guard; oppress, fight; be cramped, be afflicted, be in anguish’.

Le pari divin


 

Selon l’interprétation qu’en donnent les Upaniṣads, le but ultime du Véda, avec ses hymnes, ses chants, ses formules, est la connaissance métaphysique. Et les Upaniṣads en donnent, dans une langue à la fois précise et allusive, plusieurs indications précieuses.

En quoi consiste-t-elle ?

Certains sages ont dit qu’elle tient en une seule phrase.

D’autres, plus diserts, indiquent qu’elle touche à la nature du monde et à celle du Soi.

Ils énoncent par exemple que « le monde est une triade consistant en nom, forme et action »i, et ils ajoutent, sans contradiction, qu’il est aussi « un », et que cet Un, c’est le Soi. Qui est le Soi, alors ? Il est comme le monde, en apparence, mais il possède surtout l’immortalité. « Le Soi est un et il est cette triade. Et il est l’Immortel, caché par la réalité. En vérité l’Immortel est souffle, la réalité est nom et forme. Ce souffle est ici caché par eux deux. »ii

Pourquoi, ici, lit-on ‘eux deux’, alors que le monde est une ‘triade’ ?

Dans la triade du monde, ce qui ‘cache’, ce sont surtout le nom et la forme. L’action peut cacher, dans le monde, mais elle peut aussi révéler.

Ainsi l’un ‘agit’, comme le soleil agit. Le souffle divin agit aussi, sans parole ni forme. Le poids des mots diffère suivant les contextes…

On demandera encore: pourquoi cette opposition entre, d’un côté, ‘nom, forme, action’, et de l’autre le ‘souffle’ ? Pourquoi d’une part la réalité, et d’autre part, l’Immortel ? Pourquoi cette coupure, si tout est un ? Pourquoi la réalité du monde est-elle en réalité si irréelle, puisqu’elle est à l’évidence si fugace, si peu immortelle, et si séparée de l’Un ?

Peut-être que la réalité participe en quelque manière de l’Un, d’une façon difficile à concevoir, et qu’en conséquence, elle participe à l’Immortel.

La réalité est apparemment séparée de l’Un, mais on dit aussi qu’elle le ‘cache’, qu’elle le ‘couvre’ du voile de sa ‘réalité’ et de son ‘apparence’. Elle en est séparée, mais d’une autre façon, elle est en contact avec Lui, comme une cachette contient ce qu’elle cache, comme un vêtement couvre une nudité, comme une illusion recouvre une ignorance, comme l’existence voile l’essence.

D’où une autre question. Pourquoi tout cela est-il ainsi agencé? Pourquoi cette grandiose entité, le Soi, le Monde, l’Homme? Et pourquoi cette séparation entre le Soi, le Monde et l’Homme, métaphysiquement disjoints, séparés? A quoi riment le Monde et l’Homme, dans une aventure qui les dépasse entièrement ?

Quelle est la raison d’être de ce dispositif métaphysique ?

Une piste possible s’ouvre avec C.G. Jung, qui identifie le Soi, l’Inconscient, – et Dieu.

« En ce qui concerne le Soi, je pourrais dire qu’il est un équivalent de Dieu. »iii « Le Soi dans sa divinité (c’est-à-dire l’archétype) n’est pas conscient de cette divinité (…) Dans l’homme, Dieu se voit de l’«extérieur » et devient ainsi conscient de sa propre forme. »iv

L’idée cruciale est que Dieu a besoin de la conscience de l’homme. C’est là la raison de la création de l’homme. Jung postule « l’existence d’un être [suprême] qui pour l’essentiel est inconscient. Un tel modèle expliquerait pourquoi Dieu a créé un homme doté de conscience et pourquoi il cherche à atteindre Son but en lui. Sur ce point l’Ancien Testament, le Nouveau Testament et le bouddhisme concordent. Maître Eckhart dit que ‘Dieu n’est pas heureux dans sa divinité. Il lui fait naître en l’homme.’ C’est ce qui s’est passé avec Job : le créateur se voit lui-même à travers les yeux de la conscience humaine. »v

Qu’implique (métaphysiquement) le fait que le Soi n’a pas une entière conscience de soi, et même qu’il est bien plus inconscient que conscient ? Comment l’expliquer ? Le Soi est si infini qu’Il ne peut absolument pas avoir une conscience pleine, absolue, de Lui-même. Toute conscience est une attention à soi, une focalisation sur elle-même. Ce serait contraire à l’idée même de la conscience qu’elle soit ‘consciente’ d’infiniment tout, de tout à la fois, pour tous les temps infiniment à venir, et les temps infiniment passés.

Une omniscience intégrale, une omni-conscience, est en contradiction intrinsèque avec le concept d’infini. Car si le Soi est infini, il l’est en acte et en puissance. Or la conscience est en acte. C’est l’inconscient qui est en puissance. Le Soi conscient peut réaliser l’infini en acte, à tout instant, et partout dans le Monde, ou au cœur de chaque homme, mais il ne peut pas aussi mettre en acte ce qu’il y a de puissance (non encore réalisée) dans l’infini des possibles. Il ne peut pas être ‘en acte’, par exemple, dès aujourd’hui, dans le cœur et l’esprit des hommes de demain, dans les innombrables générations à venir, qui sont encore ‘en puissance’ d’advenir à l’existence.

L’idée qu’il y a une fort importante part d’inconscient dans le Soi, et même une part d’infini inconscient, n’a rien d’hérétique. Bien au contraire.

Le Soi n’a pas une conscience totale, absolue, de soi, mais seulement une conscience de ce qui en Lui est en acte. Il a ‘besoin’ de réaliser sa part d’inconscient, qui est en puissance en Lui, et qui est aussi en puissance dans le monde, et dans l’Homme…

C’est là le rôle de la réalité, le rôle du monde et de sa triade ‘nom, forme, action’. Seule la ‘réalité’ peut ‘réaliser’ que le Soi réside en elle, et ce que le Soi attend d’elle. C’est cette ‘réalisation’ qui contribue à faire émerger la part d’inconscient, la part de puissance, que le Soi contient, en germe; dans son in-conscient in-fini.

Le Soi poursuit sa propre marche, depuis toute éternité, et pour des éternités à venir (quoique cette expression puisse sembler bizarre, et apparemment contradictoire). Dans cette ‘aventure’ in-finie, le Soi a besoin de sortir de son ‘présent’, de sa propre ‘présence’ à soi-même. Il a besoin de ‘rêver’. En somme, le Soi ‘rêve’ la création, le monde et l’Homme, pour continuer de faire advenir en acte ce qui est encore en puissance.

C’est ainsi que le Soi se connaît Lui-même, par l’existence de ce qui n’est pas le Soi, mais qui en participe. Le Soi en apprend ainsi plus sur Lui-même que s’il restait seul, mortellement seul. Son immortalité et son infinité viennent de là, de sa puissance de renouveau, d’un renouveau absolu puisqu’il vient de ce qui n’est pas absolument le Soi, mais de ce qui lui est autre (notamment le cœur de l’Homme).

Le monde et l’Homme, tout cela est le rêve du Dieu, ce Dieu que le Véda nomme l’Homme, Puruṣa, ou le Seigneur des créatures, Prajāpati, et que les Upaniṣads nomme le Soi, ātman.

L’Homme est le rêve du Dieu qui rêve à ce qu’Il ne sait pas encore ce qu’Il sera. Ce n’est pas là une ignorance. C’est seulement l’in-fini d’un à-venir.

Il a d’ailleurs livré son nom : « Je serai qui je serai. »vi אֶהְיֶה אֲשֶׁר אֶהְיֶה ehyeh acher ehyeh. Si le Dieu qui se révéla ainsi à Moïse dans un verbe à l’aspect ‘inaccompli’, c’est que la langue hébraïque permet de lever un pan du voile. Dieu est inaccompli, comme le verbe qui le nomme.

Pascal a développé l’idée d’un ‘pari’ que l’homme devrait faire, pour gagner l’infini. J’aimerais suggérer qu’un autre ‘pari’, divin cette fois, accompagne le pari humain. C’est le pari que le Dieu a fait en créant sa création, en acceptant que du non-Soi coexiste avec Lui, dans le temps de Son rêve.

Quel est la nature du pari divin ? C’est le pari que l’Homme, par les noms, par les formes, et par les actions, viendra aider la divinité à accomplir la réalisation du Soi, toujours à faire, toujours à créer, du Soi toujours en puissance.

Le Dieu rêve que l’Homme le délivrera de Son absence (à Lui-même).

Car cette puissance, qui dort encore, d’un sommeil sans rêves, dans les infinies obscurités de Son in-conscient, c’est ce à quoi rêve aussi le Dieu qui, dans Sa lumière, ne connaît pas d’autre nuit que la sienne propre.

iB.U. 1.6.1

iiB.U. 1.6.1

iiiC.G. Jung. Lettre au Pr Gebhard Frei.1 3 Janvier 1948. Le Divin dans l’Homme. Albin Michel.1999. p.191

ivC.G. Jung. Lettre à Aniela Jaffé. 3 Septembre 1943. Le Divin dans l’Homme. Albin Michel.1999. p.185-186

vC.G. Jung. Lettre au Rev Morton Kelsey. .3 Mai 1958. Le Divin dans l’Homme. Albin Michel.1999. p.133

viEx 3,14

Infinite Journeys


The age of the universe

According to the Jewish Bible the world was created about 6000 years ago. According to contemporary cosmologists, the Big Bang dates back 14 billion years. In fact the Universe could actually be older. The Big Bang is not necessarily the only, original event. Many other universes may have existed before, in earlier ages, who knows?

Time could go back a very long way. Time could even go back to infinity according to cyclical universe theories. This is precisely what Vedic cosmology teaches.

In a famous Chinese Buddhist-inspired novel, The Peregrination to the West, there is a story of the creation of the world. It describes the formation of a mountain, and the moment « when the pure separated from the turbid ». The mountain, called the Mount of Flowers and Fruits, dominates a vast ocean. Plants and flowers never fade. « The peach tree of the immortals never ceases to form fruits, the long bamboos hold back the clouds. » This mountain is « the pillar of the sky where a thousand rivers meet ». It is “the unchanging axis of the earth through ten thousand Kalpa.”

An unchanging land for ten thousand Kalpa

What is a Kalpa? It is the Sanskrit word used to define the very long duration entailed to cosmology. To get an idea of the duration of a Kalpa, various metaphors are available. Take a 40 km cube and fill it to the brim with mustard seeds. Remove a seed every century. When the cube is empty, you will not yet be at the end of the Kalpa. Then take a large rock and wipe it once a century with a quick rag. When there is nothing left of the rock, then you will not yet be at the end of the Kalpa.

What is the age of the Universe? 6000 years? 14 billion years? 10,000 Kalpa?

We can assume that these times mean nothing certain. Just as space is curved, time is curved. The general relativity theory establishes that objects in the universe tend to move towards regions where time flows relatively more slowly. A cosmologist, Brian Greene, says: « In a way, all objects want to age as slowly as possible. » This trend, from Einstein’s point of view, is exactly comparable to the fact that objects « fall » when dropped.

For objects in the Universe that are closer to the « singularities » of space-time (such as « black holes »), time is slowing down more and more. In this interpretation, it is not ten thousand Kalpa that should be available, but billions of billions of billions of Kalpa

A human life is only an ultra-fugitive scintillation, a kind of femto-second on the scale of Kalpa, and the life of all humanity is only a heartbeat. That’s good news! The incredible stories hidden in a Kalpa, the narratives that time conceals, will never run out. The infinite of time has its own life.

Mystics, like Plotin or Pascal, reported some of their visions. But these visions were never more than snapshots, infinitesimal moments, compared to the infinite substance from which they emerged.

This substance is comparable to a landscape of infinite narratives, a never-ending number of mobile points of view, each of them opening onto other infinite worlds, some of which deserve a detour, and some may be worth an infinite journey.

The Peregrination of the Universe


According to the Jewish Bible the world was created about 6000 years ago. According to contemporary cosmologists, the Big Bang dates back 14 billion years. But the Universe could actually be older. The Big Bang is not necessarily the only, original event. Many other universes may have existed before, in earlier ages.

Time could go back a long way. This is what Vedic cosmologies teach. Time could even go back to infinity according to cyclical universe theories.

In a famous Chinese Buddhist-inspired novel, The Peregrination to the West, there is a story of the creation of the world. It describes the formation of a mountain, and the moment « when the pure separated from the turbid ». The mountain, called the Mount of Flowers and Fruits, dominates a vast ocean. Plants and flowers never fade. « The peach tree of the immortals never ceases to form fruits, the long bamboos hold back the clouds. » This mountain is « the pillar of the sky where a thousand rivers meet ». It is « the unchanging axis of the earth through ten thousand Kalpa. »

An unchanging land for ten thousand Kalpa.

What is a kalpa? It is the Sanskrit word used to define the very long duration of cosmology. To get an idea of the duration of a kalpa, various metaphors are available. Take a 40 km cube and fill it to the brim with mustard seeds. Remove a seed every century. When the cube is empty, you will not yet be at the end of the kalpa. Then take a large rock and wipe it once a century with a quick rag. When there is nothing left of the rock, then you will not yet be at the end of the kalpa.

World time: 6000 years? 14 billion years? 10,000 kalpa?

We can assume that these times mean nothing certain. Just as space is curved, time is curved. The general relativity theory establishes that objects in the universe tend to move towards regions where time flows relatively more slowly. A cosmologist, Brian Greene, put it this way: « In a way, all objects want to age as slowly as possible. » This trend, from Einstein’s point of view, is exactly comparable to the fact that objects « fall » when dropped.

For objects in the Universe that are closer to the « singularities » of space-time that proliferate there (such as « black holes »), time is slowing down more and more. In this interpretation, it is not ten thousand kalpa that should be available, but billions of billions of billions of kalpa…

A human life is only an ultra-fugitive scintillation, a kind of femto-second on the scale of kalpa, and the life of all humanity is only a heartbeat. That’s good news! The incredible stories hidden in a kalpa, the narratives that time conceals, will never run out. The infinite of time has its own life.

Mystics, like Plotin or Pascal, have reported their visions. But their images of “fire” were never more than snapshots, infinitesimal moments, compared to the infinite substance from which they emerged.

This substance, I’d like to describe it as a landscape of infinite narratives, an infinite number of mobile points of view, opening onto an infinite number of worlds, some of which deserve a detour, and others are worth the endless journey.

Les mystères du cerveau humain (2)


 

Le cerveau humain est manifestement capable de se corréler (efficacement) avec le « monde »i, et cela selon de multiples modalités, notamment neurobiologique, mentale, spirituelle… Il existe sans doute d’autres modes de corrélation cerveau-monde dont nous n’avons pas nécessairement conscience, – à commencer précisément par les puissances propres de l’inconscient (qu’il soit individuel ou collectif), ou encore celles du rêve ou de la prémonition.

Quoiqu’il en soit, l’important c’est que ces multiples formes de corrélation impliquent un ensemble de liaisons plus ou moins fortes, plus ou moins intégrées, entre le cerveau et le « monde ». On en déduit que le cerveau ne peut être réduit à un organe solipsiste, splendidement isolé, régnant en maître absolu au milieu de certitudes cartésiennes du genre « Je pense donc je suis ».

Le cerveau est naturellement en flux, en tension, en interaction permanente avec de multiples aspects d’une réalité éminemment complexe, riche, et finalement insaisissable dans son essence.

Dans un monde moderne où la communication électronique est devenue ubiquitaire, il peut être plus aisé de proposer ici la métaphore de l’antenne. Le cerveau est comme une sorte d’« antenne », multibandes, multi-fréquences. Il est en mesure de recevoir et de traiter les informations sensorielles (vue, audition, toucher, goût, odorat), mais aussi de « découvrir » d’autres espaces de sens abstraits (comme ceux que les mathématiques donnent abstraitement à « voir »). Ces autres espaces de sens semblent dans un premier temps appartenir uniquement à la sphère humaine, mais ils se révèlent aussi, inopinément, et de façon surprenante et au fond mystérieuse, capables de nous aider à « saisir » de manière spécifique des aspects structurels du « monde ». Ces aspects seraient restés « cachés », si les structures mathématiques que le cerveau est capable d’engendrer n’étaient pas venues à point nommé pour lui permettre de les « comprendre » en quelque manière, c’est-à-dire pour lui permettre de déterminer des formes d’adéquation efficace entre les capacités d’intellection du cerveau et les potentialités intelligibles du « monde ».

L’enfant nouveau-né développe lentement mais sûrement une carte multi-sensorielle du monde, par le toucher, le goût et l’odorat, les sons et les lumières, mais il est d’abord immergé dans un petit monde amniotique, dont il émerge avec quelque difficulté pour être aussitôt plongé dans un autre « monde », le monde affectif, aimant, chaleureux que ses parents lui offrent d’emblée à la naissance. Cette première (et double) expérience, d’immersion « dans » un monde limité, inexplicable, contraignant (par l’étroitesse de l’utérus, et l’impossibilité de déployer des membres apparemment encombrants, inutiles, superfétatoires), et d’émergence, de passage « vers » un autre monde, où se révèlent soudainement des millions de stimulations tout-à-fait autres, est une expérience fondatrice, qui doit rester à jamais gravée dans le cerveau nouvellement né.

Expérience fondatrice, mais aussi formatrice. Elle nous prépare secrètement à affronter d’autres mystères à venir, car le monde nous réserve tout au long de la vie bien d’autres expériences (métaphoriques) de « naissances » et de « passages » d’ordre symbolique ou cognitif. Cette expérience est si bien « engrammée » dans le cerveau que la perspective de la mort, dans de nombreuses traditions spirituelles, semble n’être elle-même qu’une nouvelle « naissance », un nouveau « passage ».

La métaphore du cerveau-antenne a déjà été proposée à la fin du 19ème siècle par William James dans un texte célèbreii. Elle est importante parce qu’elle suggère la possibilité d’un continuum complexe entre le cerveau et le monde (pris dans son acception la plus large possible). Mais elle se prête aussi à une généralisation puissante, allant dans le sens de la noosphère de Teilhard de Chardin, si l’on conçoit que chaque « antenne » peut être mise en communication avec les milliards d’autres cerveaux vivant actuellement sur cette planète, et pourquoi pas, – soyons fous ! –, avec les milliards de milliards de « cerveaux » naviguant probablement dans d’autres galaxies, et d’autres nébuleuses.

Nous avons employé jusqu’à présent le mot « cerveau », sans vraiment chercher à définir ce que l’on peut entendre par ce mot. Les neurosciences ont récemment fait de sensibles progrès dans l’analyse de cet organe essentiel, mais n’ont sans doute pas réussi à expliquer son essence même, c’est-à-dire la nature de la « conscience ». Dans le monde matérialiste et scientiste actuel, les tendances de la recherche visent à démontrer (sans succès notable jusqu’à présent) que la conscience ne serait qu’une propriété émergeant « naturellement » de la « complexité » de l’enchevêtrement neuronal, et résultant de quelque « auto-poièse » neuro-biologique. Cette explication propose sans doute des éléments nécessaires à la compréhension, mais ceux-ci sont loin d’être suffisants.

Ils n’aident pas vraiment à rendre compte de ce que l’humanité a pu engendrer de plus extraordinaire (ici, on peut glisser la liste des Mozart et des Vinci, des Newton et des Einstein, des Platon et des Pascal…).

La métaphore du cerveau-antenne en revanche, loin de se concentrer sur la soupe neurochimique et l’enchevêtrement neuro-synaptique, vise à établir l’existence de liens génésiques, organiques et subtils entre les cerveaux, de toutes natures et de toutes conditions, et le « monde ».

Les perspectives de la réflexion changent alors radicalement.

Le cerveau « normal » d’un être humain devrait dès lors être considéré simplement comme une plate-forme minimale à partir de laquelle peuvent se développer des potentialités extraordinaires, dans certaines conditions (épigénétiques, sociales, circonstancielles, …).

De même que l’immense monde des mathématiques, avec ses puissances incroyables, peut être décrit non comme résultant d’« inventions » brillantes par telles ou telles personnalités particulièrement douées, mais plutôt comme faisant l’objet de véritables « découvertes », – de même l’on peut induire que le monde encore plus vaste des révélations, des visions et des intuitions (spirituelles, mystiques, poétiques,…) n’est pas un monde « inventé » par telles ou telles personnalités (comme des Moïse, des Bouddha ou des Jésus, à l’esprit un peu faible, selon les esprits forts des temps modernes), mais bien un monde « découvert », dont on ne fait qu’entrevoir seulement les infinies virtualités.

Le cerveau peut dès lors être compris comme un organe qui ne cesse d’émerger hors de ses limites initiales (celles posées par sa matérialité neuro-biologique). Il ne cesse de croître en sortant de ses propres confins. Il s’auto-engendre en s’ouvrant au monde, et à tous les mondes. Il est en constante interaction avec le monde tel que les sens nous le donnent à voir, mais aussi avec des univers entiers, tissés de pensées, d’intuitions, de visions, de révélations, dont seuls les « meilleurs d’entre nous » sont capables de percevoir les émanations, les efflorescences, les correspondances…

La conscience émerge dans le cerveau nouveau-né, non pas seulement parce que l’équipement neuro-synaptique le permet, mais aussi et surtout parce que de la conscience pré-existe dans le monde, sous des myriades de formes. La conscience pré-existe dans l’univers parce que l’univers lui-même est doté d’une sorte de conscience. Il est vain de chercher à expliquer l’apparition de la conscience dans le cerveau humain uniquement par un arrangement moléculaire ou synaptique spécialement efficace. Il est plus aisé de concevoir que la conscience individuelle émerge parce qu’elle puise sa jouvence et sa puissance propre à la fontaine de la conscience universelle, laquelle entre en communication avec chacun d’entre nous par l’intermédiaire de nos « antennes ».

Ce que l’on vient de dire sur la conscience, on pourrait le répéter sur l’émergence de la raison en chacun de nous, mais aussi sur la grâce de la révélation (quant à elle réservée à quelques élus).

Dans un prochain article, je parlerai des conséquences possible de cette idée d’émergence de la conscience et de la raison humaines, comme résultant de l’interaction entre le cerveau et le monde.

i Le « monde » est tout ce avec quoi le cerveau peut entrer en corrélation effective. Il va de soi que les limites de cette définition du « monde » pointent aussi vers tous les aspects du « monde » qui restent décidément impénétrables au cerveau humain, jusqu’à plus ample informé…

ii William James. Human Immortality.1898. Ed. Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.

Les voyages infinis de l’univers


D’après la bible juive le monde a été créé il y a environ 6000 ans. D’après les cosmologistes contemporains, le Big Bang remonte à 14 milliards d’années. Mais l’Univers pourrait être en fait plus ancien, le Big Bang n’étant pas nécessairement un événement unique et originel, mais succédant à d’autres épisodes antérieurs.

Le temps de l’Univers pourrait alors remonter bien plus loin en arrière, comme dans les cosmologies védiques, – ou même à l’infini selon les interprétations des données disponibles qui induisent à concevoir un univers cyclique.

Dans La pérégrination vers l’Ouest, un célèbre roman chinois d’inspiration bouddhique, il y a un récit de la création du monde, qui décrit poétiquement la formation d’une montagne, « au moment où le pur se séparait du turbide ». Dès son apparition, cette montagne, appelée mont des Fleurs et des Fruits, « domine le vaste océan ». Les plantes et les fleurs jamais ne s’y fanent. « Le pêcher des immortels ne cesse de former des fruits, les bambous longs retiennent les nuages. » Cette montagne est « le pilier du ciel où se rencontrent mille rivières », et elle est surtout « l’axe immuable de la terre à travers dix mille kalpa. »

Voilà donc une autre indication de temps. Une immuabilité de dix mille kalpa. Qu’est-ce qu’un kalpa ? C’est un mot sanskrit utilisé pour définir les durées longues de la cosmologie. Pour se faire une idée approximative de la durée d’un kalpa, on recourt à diverses métaphores. Prenez un cube de 40 km de côté et emplissez-le à ras bord de graines de moutarde. Retirez une graine tous les siècles. Quand le cube sera vide, vous ne serez pas encore au bout du kalpa. On peut prendre aussi une gros rocher et l’essuyer une fois par siècle d’un rapide coup de chiffon. Lorsqu’il ne restera plus rien du rocher, alors vous ne serez pas encore au bout du kalpa.

Alors : 6000 ans ? 14 milliards d’années ? 10.000 kalpa ?

On peut faire l’hypothèse assez raisonnable que ces temps ne veulent rien dire de très assuré. En effet, de même que l’espace est courbe, le temps est courbe aussi. La théorie de la relativité générale établit que les objets de l’univers ont une tendance à se mouvoir vers les régions où le temps s’écoule relativement plus lentement. Voici comment un cosmologiste, Brian Greene, formule la chose : « En un sens, tous les objets veulent vieillir aussi lentement que possible. » Cette tendance, du point de vue d’Einstein, est exactement comparable au fait que les objets « tombent » quand on les lâche.

Autrement dit, pour des objets de l’Univers qui se rapprochent des singularités de l’espace-temps qui y prolifèrent, alors le temps se ralentit toujours davantage. Ce n’est pas de dix mille kalpa dont il faudrait disposer, mais de milliards de milliards de kalpa

Une vie humaine n’est qu’une scintillation ultra-fugace, une sorte de femto-seconde à l’échelle des kalpa, et la vie de toute l’humanité n’est qu’un battement de cœur. C’est une bonne nouvelle ! Ceci implique que les récits inouïs qui se cachent dans la profondeur des kalpa, les infinies narrations que le temps recèle, ne sont jamais épuisés. Aucune vision ne les résume. Autrement dit, l’infini des temps possède sa propre vie.

Des mystiques, comme Plotin ou Pascal, ont raconté leur vision admirable. Mais ces visions inimaginables ne sont jamais que des témoignages instantanés ; elles résument l’aperception de quelques moments infiniment infimes, si on les compare aux récits infinis desquels ils ont été extraits.

Il faut se résoudre à prendre conscience, au moins dans son principe, de l’existence d’un infini paysage de récits infinis, d’une infinité de points de vue mobiles, ouvrant chacun sur une infinité de mondes, dont certains méritent le détour, et d’autres valent même l’infini voyage.