Artificial Intelligence and Resurrection


In the 2nd century AD, the Roman Empire was at its height and dominated much of the ancient world. On the religious level, the era was one of syncretism. For its part, the nascent Christianity began to spread around the Mediterranean and reached Carthage. But it already has a lot to struggle with the Gnostic sects and other various heresies.

It was better not to mix religion and politics. The Empire did not tolerate claims of autonomy or religions that could encourage them.

The second Judeo-Roman war (132-135), triggered by Bar-Kokhba, ended with the expulsion of Jews from Judea. Jerusalem was razed to the ground by Hadrian, and a new city was built on its ruins, Ælia Capitolina.

Judea was renamed and called Palestine, from the word « Philistine » referring to one of the indigenous peoples, which is quoted in the Bible (Gen. 21:32; Gen. 26:8; Ex. 13:17).

Emperor Hadrian died three years after the fall of Jerusalem in 138, and these verses, of which he is the author, were written on his grave:

« Animula vagula blandula
Hospes comesque corporis
Quæ nunc abibis in loca
Pallidula rigida nudula
Nec ut soles dabis iocos ».

Which can be translated as follows:

« Little soul, little vague, all cuddly,

hostess and companion of my body,

you who are now going to places

livid, icy, naked,

you won’t make your usual jokes anymore. »

Around the same time, Apuleius, a writer and Roman citizen of Berber origin, born in 123 in Madauros, Numidia (now Algeria), came to complete his studies in Carthage. Apuleius was to become a famous speaker and novelist. His neoplatonism led him to believe that direct contact between gods and men was impossible, and that there had to be « intermediate » beings to allow exchanges between them.

To dramatize the question of contact between the divine and the human, Apuleius detailed the loving, direct and fusional relationship of the god Eros (divine love) and the princess Psyche (human soul), in a passage from his famous Metamorphoses. This meeting of Eros and Psyche received an extraordinary welcome and entered the pantheon of world literature. Since then, it has been the subject of countless repetitions by artists of all time.

But Metamorphoses is also a novel, picaresque, erotic and metaphysical, with a good layer of second and third degrees. There are several levels of intertwined reading and comprehension, which have ensured its modernity for almost two millennia.

The end of the novel focuses on the story of Lucius’ initiation into the mysteries of Isis, carried out at his request (and at great expense) by the high priest Mithras. Lucius can reveal nothing of the mysteries of initiation, of course.

The only concession to the curiosity of profane intelligence, Apuleius places in Lucius’s mouth a few cryptic verses, just before the hero walks into the sacred building, dressed in twelve priestly robes, in order to be presented to the crowd as « the statue of the sun ».

Lucius said then:

« I touched the edge of death, after crossing the threshold of Proserpine, I was carried through all the elements, and I came back. »

For sure, it seems like it was a descent into the underworld, a real one.

The descent into Hades was the ultimate adventure of the initiate. There had already been in the literature some prestigious predecessors, such as Orpheus, or in another order of reference, less literary and certainly less known in the Greek-Roman world, such as the descent of Jesus into Hell.

The time was fond of travelling to the land of the dead. At the same time, around 170, under Marcus Aurelius, a curious text appeared, the Chaldaic Oracles, presenting itself as a theurgic text, with a much more serious tone:

« Do not lean down towards the world of dark reflections; it is underpinned by an eternal, shapeless, dark, sordid, ghostly, devoid of Intellect, full of precipices and tortuous paths, constantly rolling a mutilated depth »i.

Nineteen centuries later, where are we now? Should we look at the depths or should we not talk at all about them?

The main religions of the moment offer a confusing picture of the problem, and seem to have little ability to formulate a solution.

But popular culture remains fascinated by the issue. In Battlestar Galactica, Humans are in total war against the Cylons, revolted robots that have evolved rapidly, reproducing in particular in the form of clones with a biological body, similar in appearance to that of human beings.

Humans are adepts of a polytheistic religion. They pray to the « gods of Kobol » and wander through space in search of a mythical planet called Earth, of which no one knows exactly if it exists or where it is located. They are guided by their President, who has visions, and who already knows that she will die without seeing the Promised Land. They are mercilessly pursued by the Cylons who have already exterminated almost the entire human race.

The Cylon robots profess, with great energy, their faith in a single god, whom they call « God ». The Cylons are very intelligent. They are not afraid to die, because they say (to the Humans who threaten them), that if their bodies are destroyed, then their minds will be « downloaded » into this « God ».

However, there is a problem. Intergalactic communications can be very weak in the event of a crisis. What happens to the spirit of a Cylon being downloaded, wandering through space without being picked up by a communication relay?

Battlestar Galactica. The Chaldaic Oracles. The Gospel of Jesus. The Metamorphoses of Apuleius. Hadrian’s epitaph.

There are those who wander endlessly in the icy night (Hadrian, the Chaldaic Oracles). And those who, after descending into Hell, return from the kingdom of the dead (Orpheus, Lucius, Jesus).

Between these two options, Battlestar Galactica‘s Cylons, these very intelligent and religious robots, have resolutely chosen the most promising one.

The transhumanist movement promotes similar ideas. The downloading of memory and consciousness is for tomorrow, says Ray Kurzweil.

Let’s do some science fiction. Imagine that ubiquitous networks and memory silos, supported by futuristic artificial intelligence techniques, will one day record and process all the thoughts and actions of all humans, from birth to death.

Then future generations would have at their disposal a kind of constantly evolving memory of humanity as a whole. And from this interactive memorial, from this human mine, they could permanently extract pearls of wisdom, sweet madness, unfulfilled dreams and fantastic projects.

Perhaps they would even come to consider this living memory as a kind of divine incarnation.

We would plunge into it, as Lucius once explored the ends of death, in order to live a new life.

iOracles Chaldaïques. Fr. 163 (tr. fr. E. des Places, Belles Lettres, 1996, p. 106).

Métaphysique du sacrifice


Dans la philosophie platonicienne, le Dieu Éros (l’Amour) représente un Dieu toujours à la recherche de la plénitude, toujours en mouvement, pour combler son manque d’être.

Mais comment un Dieu pourrait-il manquer d’être ?

Si l’Amour signale un manque, comme l’affirme Platon, comment l’Amour pourrait-il être un Dieu, dont l’essence est d’être?

Un Dieu ‘Amour’ à la façon de Platon n’est pleinement ‘Dieu’ que par sa relation d’amour avec ce qu’il aime. Cette relation implique un ‘mouvement’ et une ‘dépendance’ de la nature divine par rapport à l’objet de son ‘Amour’.

Comment comprendre un tel ‘mouvement’ et une telle ‘dépendance’ dans un Dieu transcendant, un Dieu dont l’essence est d’ ‘être’, dont l’Être est a priori au-delà de tout manque d’être?

C’est pourquoi Aristote critique Platon. L’amour n’est pas une essence, mais seulement un moyen. Si Dieu se définit comme l’Être par excellence, il est aussi ‘immobile’ affirme Aristote. Premier Moteur immobile, il donne son mouvement à toute la création.

« Le Principe et le premier des êtres est immobile : il l’est par essence et par accident, et il imprime le mouvement premier, éternel et un. »i

Dieu, ‘immobile’, met en mouvement le monde et tous les êtres qu’il contient, en leur insufflant l’amour, le désir de leur ‘fin’. Le monde se met en mouvement parce qu’il désire cette ‘fin’. La fin du monde est dans l’amour de la ‘fin’, dans le désir de rejoindre la ‘fin’ ultime en vue de laquelle le monde a été mis en mouvement.

« La cause finale, en effet, est l’être pour qui elle est une fin, et c’est aussi le but lui-même ; en ce dernier sens, la fin peut exister parmi les êtres immobiles. »ii

Pour Aristote donc, Dieu ne peut pas être ‘Amour’, ou Éros. L’Éros platonicien n’est qu’un dieu ‘intermédiaire’. C’est par l’intermédiaire d’ Éros que Dieu met tous les êtres en mouvement. Dieu met le monde en mouvement par l’amour qu’Il inspire. Mais il n’est pas Amour. L’amour est l’intermédiaire par lequel on vise la ‘cause finale’, la ‘fin’ de Dieu.

« La cause finale meut comme objet de l’amour. » iii.

On voit là que la conception du Dieu d’Aristote se distingue radicalement de la conception chrétienne d’un Dieu qui est pour sa part essentiellement « amour ». « Dieu a tant aimé le monde » (Jn, 3,16).

Le Christ renverse les tables de la loi aristotélicienne, celle d’un Dieu ‘immobile’, un Dieu pour qui l’amour n’est qu’un moyen en vue d’une fin, nommé abstraitement la « cause finale ».

Le Dieu du Christ n’est pas ‘immobile’. Paradoxal, dans sa puissance, il s’est mis à la merci de l’amour (ou du désamour, ou de l’indifférence, ou de l’ignorance) de sa création.

Pour Aristote, le divin immobile est toujours à l’œuvre, partout, en toutes choses, comme ‘Premier Moteur’. L’état divin représente le maximum possible de l’être, l’Être même. Tous les autres êtres manquent d’être. Le niveau le plus bas dans l’échelle de Jacob des étants est celui de l’être seulement en puissance d’être, l’être purement virtuel.

Le Dieu du Christ, en revanche, n’est pas toujours à l’œuvre, il se ‘vide’, il est ‘raillé’, ‘humilié’, il ‘meurt’, et il ‘s’absente’.

Finalement, on pourrait dire que la conception chrétienne de la kénose divine est plus proche de la conception platonicienne d’un Dieu-Amour qui souffre de ‘manque’, que de la conception aristotélicienne du Dieu, ‘Premier Moteur’ et ‘cause finale’.

Il y a un véritable paradoxe philosophique à considérer que l’essence du Dieu est un manque ou un ‘vide’ au cœur de l’Être.

Dans cette hypothèse, l’amour ne serait pas seulement un ‘manque’ d’être, comme le pense Platon, mais ferait partie de l’essence divine elle-même. Le manque serait en réalité la plus haute forme de l’être.

Qu’est-ce que l’essence d’un Dieu dont le manque est au cœur ?

Il y a un nom – fort ancien, qui en donne une idée : le ‘Sacrifice’.

Cette idée profondément anti-intuitive est apparue quatre mille ans avant le Christ. Le Veda a forgé un nom pour la décrire : Devayajña, le ‘Sacrifice du Dieu’. Un célèbre hymne védique décrit la Création comme l’auto-immolation du Créateuriv. Prajāpati se sacrifie totalement soi-même, et par là il peut donner entièrement à la création son Soi. Il se sacrifie mais il vit par ce sacrifice même. Il reste vivant parce que le sacrifice lui donne un nouveau Souffle, un nouvel Esprit.

« Le Seigneur suprême dit à son père, le Seigneur de toutes les créatures : ‘J’ai trouvé le sacrifice qui exauce les désirs : laisse-moi l’accomplir pour toi !’ – ‘Soit !’ répondit-il. Alors il l’accomplit pour lui. Après le sacrifice, il souhaita : ‘Puis-je être tout ici !’. Il devint Souffle, et maintenant le Souffle est partout ici. »v

Ce n’est pas tout. L’analogie entre le Véda et le christianisme est plus profonde. Elle inclut le ‘vide’ divin.

« Le Seigneur des créatures [Prajāpati], après avoir engendré les êtres vivants, se sentit comme vidé. Les créatures se sont éloignées de lui ; elles ne sont pas restées avec lui pour sa joie et sa subsistance. »vi

« Après avoir engendré tout ce qui existe, il se sentit comme vidé et il eut peur de la mort. »vii

Le ‘vide’ du Seigneur des créatures est formellement analogue à la ‘kénose’ du Christ (kénose vient du grec kenosis et du verbe kenoein, ‘vider’).

Il y a aussi la métaphore védique du ‘démembrement’, qui anticipe celle du démembrement d’Osiris, de Dionysos et d’Orphée.

« Quand il eut produit toutes les créatures, Prajāpati tomba en morceaux. Son souffle s’en alla. Quand son souffle ne fut plus actif, les Dieux l’abandonnèrent »viii.

« Réduit à son cœur, abandonné, il émit un cri : ‘Hélas, ma vie !’ Les eaux le sentirent. Elles vinrent à son aide et par le moyen du sacrifice du Premier Né, il établit sa souveraineté. »ix

On le voit, comme le Véda l’a vu. Le Sacrifice du Seigneur de la création est à l’origine de l’univers. C’est pourquoi « le sacrifice est le nombril de l’univers ».x

Le plus intéressant peut-être, si l’on parvient jusque là, est d’en tirer une conclusion pour ce qui concerne tous les autres êtres.

« Tout ce qui existe, quel qu’il soit, est fait pour participer au sacrifice ».xi

Dure leçon, pour qui projette son regard au loin.

iAristote. Métaphysique, Λ, 8, 1073a, 24 Trad. J. Tricot. Ed. Vrin, Paris 1981, p.688

iiAristote. Métaphysique, Λ, 7, 1072b, 2 Trad. J. Tricot. Ed. Vrin, Paris 1981, p.678

iiiAristote. Métaphysique, Λ, 7, 1072b, 3 Trad. J. Tricot. Ed. Vrin, Paris 1981, p.678

ivRV I,164

vŚatapatha Brāhmaṇa (SB) XI,1,6,17

viSB III,9,1,1

viiSB X,10,4,2,2

viiiSB VI,1,2,12-13

ixTaittirīya Brāhmaṇa 2,3,6,1

xRV I,164,35

xiSB III,6,2,26

Dieu et l’amour


Platon pense l’amour (Éros) comme un manque d’être. Éros est la figure divine d’un amour qui toujours cherche la plénitude, qui toujours se met en mouvement pour l’atteindre.

C’est pourquoi Aristote, en cela vrai disciple de Platon, pense que Dieu ne peut être amour.

Car il ne peut manquer d’être.

S’il était lié à l’amour, il ne serait pleinement « Dieu » que dans la mesure où il serait aimé.

Cela reviendrait à le limiter. Ce serait poser là une sorte de condition a priori à la nature divine, celle de dépendre de l’amour d’un aimant.

Comment accepter l’idée que le plus grand Dieu puisse manquer d’être, sauf à être aimé ? Comment pourrait-il ne devoir la complétude de son être divin qu’à l’amour d’un autre que lui-même ?

Peut-on arbitrairement limiter la puissance de Dieu en le contraignant à cette nécessité d’être aimé ?

Il est donc au-delà de l’amour. Aristote affirme que le divin est le sommet de l’être.

Ce sommet est « immobile ». Il est au-delà du monde, en mouvement.

Mais c’est lui qui met le monde et tous les autres êtres en mouvement, parce qu’il en est aimé.

C’est par l’intermédiaire d’Éros qu’il met les êtres en mouvement, par l’amour qu’il inspire.

« Dieu met en mouvement en tant qu’il est aimé » i.

Cette mise en mouvement est celle du désir d’aller jusqu’à l’aimé.

Cette conception se distingue radicalement de la conception chrétienne d’un Dieu essentiellement et positivement « amour ». « Dieu a tant aimé le monde » (Jn, 3,16).

Le Christ renverse entièrement les tables de la loi aristotélicienne (de l’amour).

Idée révolutionnaire.

Dieu, non plus immobile, mais mis à la merci de l’amour de sa créature !

Qu’on est loin, également, du Yahvé Tsabaoth, qui n’a cure que de ceux qui le craignent.

Quels poids relatifs peut-on accorder à ces diverses conceptions?

Pour Aristote, le divin c’est ce qui est immobile, et qui est toujours à l’œuvre, partout, en toutes choses.

L’état divin représente le maximum possible de l’être ; il faut en déduire l’existence d’une kyrielle de niveaux inférieurs d’êtres, tous manquant d’être selon une modalité ou une autre.

Le niveau le plus bas dans cette échelle de Jacob ontologique serait celui de l’être qui n’aurait aucune réalité propre, un être qui serait seulement en puissance d’être, un être tout entier en virtualité.

Qu’est-ce qu’un Dieu transcendant, loin au-delà de toute représentation, peut avoir en commun avec ses myriades de créatures ‘inférieures’ ? Comment une telle transcendance pourrait-elle dépendre de quelque contingence (comme celle de l’amour de la créature pour Dieu) ?

Une possible voie de synthèse serait la suivante.

L’amour n’est pas un manque, à la façon de Platon, mais fait partie de l’essence divine elle-même. La mise en abîme, celle du plus grand Dieu confronté le plus misérablement possible au mépris, à la haine, ou à l’indifférence de sa propre créature, proclame son infinie différence par l’alliance contradictoire de deux attributs : le plus grand, le plus faible.

Transposé dans le vocabulaire de l’amour : le plus grand dans l’amour donné, le plus faible dans l’amour reçu.

iAristote. Métaphysique, XI, 7, 1072b, 3