West does not meet East, does it?


« Raimon Panikkar »

For more than two centuries, the West has produced a small but highly committed phalanx of Indianists, Sanskritists and Veda specialists. Their translations, commentaries, reviews, and scholarly theses are generally of good quality and show a high level of scholarship. The specialized departments of some Western universities have been able to promote, year after year, excellent contributions to the knowledge of the enormous mass of documents and texts, Vedic and post-Vedic, belonging to a tradition whose origins go back more than four thousand years.

One is quickly struck, however, by the dazzling diversity of the points of view expressed by these specialists on the deep meaning and the very nature of the Veda. One is surprised by the remarkable differences in the interpretations provided, and in the end, in spite of a smooth harmony of facade, by their incompatibility and their irreconcilable cacophony.

To give a quick idea of the spectrum of opinions, I would like to briefly quote some of the best experts on Vedic India.

Of course, if one wanted to be complete, one would have to make a systematic review of all the research in indology since the beginning of the 19th century, to determine the structural biases, the interpretative flaws, the blindness and the cultural deafness…

I will limit myself to just touching on the issue by evoking a few significant works by well-known specialists: Émile Burnouf, Sylvain Lévi, Henri Hubert, Marcel Mauss, Louis Renou, Frits Staal, Charles Malamoud, Raimon Panikkar.

The following ideas will be found there in a jumble, – surprisingly eclectic and contradictory:

Vāk is the Logos. Or: The Vedic Word (Vāk) is equivalent to the Greek Logos and the Johannine Word.

-The Veda (a.k.a. the « Aryan Bible ») is « coarse » and comes from « semi-savage » people.

-God’s sacrifice is only a « social fact ».

-The Veda got lost in India quite early on.

-The rites (and especially Vedic rites) have no meaning.

-The sacrifice represents the union of the Male and Female.

-Sacrifice is the Navel of the Universe.

Émile Burnoufi: Vāk is the Logos

Active in the second half of the 19th century, Émile Burnouf asserted that the Vedic Aryâs had a very clear awareness of the value of their cult, and of their role in this respect. « Vedic poets state that they themselves created the gods: ‘The ancestors shaped the forms of the gods, as the worker shapes iron’ (Vāmadéva II,108), and that without the Hymn, the deities of heaven and earth would not be. » ii

The Vedic Hymn « increases the power of the gods, enlarges their domain and makes them reign. » iii

But the Hymn is also, par excellence, the Word (Vāk).

In the Ṛg-Veda, a famous hymniv is called « Word ».

Here are some excerpts, translated by Burnouf :

« I am wise; I am the first of those honoured by the Sacrifice.

The one I love, I make him terrible, pious, wise, enlightened.

I give birth to the Father. My dwelling is on his very head, in the midst of the waves (…)

I exist in all the worlds and I extend to the heaven.

Like the wind, I breathe in all worlds. My greatness rises above this earth, above the very heaven. »

Emile Burnouf comments and concludes:

« This is not yet the theory of the Logos, but this hymn and those that resemble it can be considered as the starting point of the theory of the Logos. » v

From Vāk to Logos! From the Veda to the Word of theGospel of John!

Multi-millenium jump, intercultural, meta-philosophical, trans-religious!

Remember that Vāk appeared at least one thousand years before the Platonic Logos and at least one thousand five hundred years before John the Evangelist used the Logos as a metaphor for the Divine Word.

Does Burnouf force the line beyond all measure?

Is this not an anachronism, or worse, a fundamental bias of an ideological nature, unduly bringing religious traditions closer together without any connection between them?

Or is it not rather a great intuition on his part?

Who will tell?

Let’s see what other indianists think about it…

Sylvain Levivi: the « Aryan Bible » is « crude ».

Curious figure that that of Sylvain Lévi, famous indologist, pupil of the Indianist Abel Bergaigne. On the one hand, he seems cheerfully to despise the Brāhmaṇas, which were nevertheless the object of his long, learned and thorough studies. On the other hand, he acknowledges a certain relative value with his lips.

Let’s judge:

« Morality has found no place in this system [of Brāhmaṇas]: the sacrifice that regulates man’s relationship with the deities is a mechanical operation that acts through its intimate energy; hidden within nature, it is only released from it through the magical action of the priest. The worried and malevolent gods are forced to surrender, defeated and subdued by the very force that gave them greatness. In spite of them, the sacrificer rises to the heavenly world and ensures himself a definitive place in it for the future: man becomes superhuman. » vii

We could ask ourselves why eminent specialists like Sylvain Lévi spend so much time and energy on a subject they denigrate, deep down inside?

Sylvain Lévi’s analysis is indeed surprising by the vigor of the attack, the vitriol of certain epithets (« coarse religion », « people of half savages »), mixed, it is true, with some more positive views:

« Sacrifice is a magical operation; the regenerating initiation is a faithful reproduction of conception, gestation and childbirth; faith is only confidence in the virtue of the rites; the passage to heaven is a step-by-step ascent; the good is ritual accuracy. Such a coarse religion supposes a people of half-wild people; but the sorcerers, the wizards or the shamans of these tribes knew how to analyze their system, to dismantle its parts, to fix its laws; they are the true fathers of the Hindu philosophy. » viii

The contempt for the « half-wild ones » is coupled with a kind of more targeted disdain for what Levi calls, with some sharp irony, the « Aryan Bible » of the Vedic religion (reminder: Levi’s text dates from 1898):

« The defenders of the Aryan Bible, who have the happy privilege of tasting the freshness and naivety of the hymns, are free to imagine a long and profound decadence of religious feeling among the poets and doctors of the Vedic religion; others will refuse to admit such a surprising evolution of beliefs and doctrines, which makes a stage of gross barbarity follow a period of exquisite delicacy. In fact it is difficult to conceive of anything more brutal and material than the theology of Brāhmaṇas; the notions that usage has slowly refined and taken on a moral aspect, surprise by their wild realism. » ix

Sylvain Levi condescends, however, to give a more positive assessment when he points out that Vedic priests also seem to recognize the existence of a « unique » divinity:

« Speculations about sacrifice not only led the Hindu genius to recognize as a fundamental dogma the existence of a unique being; they may have initiated him into the idea of transmigrations ». x

Curious word that that of transmigration, clearly anachronistic in a Vedic context… Everything happens as if the Veda (which never uses this very Buddhist word of transmigration…) had in the eyes of Levi for only true interest, for lack of intrinsic value, the fact of carrying in him the scattered germs of a Buddhism which still remained to come, more than one millennium later….

« The Brāhmaṇas ignore the multiplicity of man’s successive existences; the idea of repeated death only appears there to form a contrast with the infinite life of the inhabitants of the heaven. But the eternity of the Sacrifice is divided into infinitely numerous periods; whoever offers it kills him and each death resurrects him. The supreme Male, the Man par excellence (a.k.a. Puruṣa) dies and is reborn again and again (…) The destiny of the Male was to easily end up being the ideal type of human existence. The sacrifice made man in his own image. The « seer » who discovers by the sole force of his intelligence, without the help of the gods and often against their will, the rite or formula that ensures success, is the immediate precursor of the Buddhas and Jinas who discover, by direct intuition and spontaneous illumination, the way to salvation. » xi

The Veda, one sees it, would be hardly that one way towards the Buddha, according to Levi.

Henri Hubert and Marcel Maussxii: The divine sacrifice is only a « social fact ».

In their famous Essay on the Nature and Function of Sacrifice (1899), Henri Hubert and Marcel Mauss undertook the ambitious and perilous task of comparing various forms of sacrifice, as revealed by historical, religious, anthropological and sociological studies, affecting the whole of humanity.

Convinced that they had succeeded in formulating a « general explanation, » they thought they could affirm the « unity of the sacrificial system » across all cultures and all eras.

« It is that, in the end, under the diversity of the forms that it takes, [the sacrifice] is always made by the same process that can be used for the most different purposes. This process consists in establishing communication between the sacred and profane worlds through a victim, that is, something destroyed in the course of the ceremony. » xiii

The unity of the « sacrificial system » is revealed mainly as a « social fact », through the « sacralization of the victim » which becomes a « social thing »: « Religious notions, because they are believed, are; they exist objectively, as social facts. Sacred things, in relation to which the sacrifice functions, are social things, and that is enough to explain the sacrifice. » xiv

The study by Hubert and Mauss is based in particular on the comparative analysis of Vedic sacrifices and sacrifices among the ancient Hebrews.

These authors attempt to determine a common principle, unifying extremely diverse types of sacrifice. « In the course of religious evolution, the notion of sacrifice has joined the notions concerning the immortality of the soul. We have nothing to add on this point to the theories of Rohde, Jevons and Nutt on the Greek mysteries, whose facts quoted by M. S. Levi, borrowed from the doctrines of the Brahmanasxv and those that Bergaigne and Darmesteter had already extracted from vedicxvi and avesticxvii texts, must be compared. Let us also mention the relationship that unites Christian communion to eternal salvationxviii. (…) The characteristic feature of objective sacrifices is that the main effect of the rite is, by definition, on an object other than the sacrificer. Indeed, the sacrifice does not return to its point of departure; the things it is intended to modify are outside the sacrificer. The effect produced on the latter is thus secondary. It is the central phase, the sacrifice, which tends to take up the most space. It is above all a question of creating spirit. » xix

This principle of unity takes all its resonance with the sacrifice of the god.

« The types of sacrifice of the god that we have just reviewed are realized in concreto and gathered together in one and the same Hindu rite: the sacrifice of soma. We can see first of all what a true sacrifice of the god is in the ritual. We cannot expose here how Soma god is confused with the soma plant, how he is really present there, nor can we describe the ceremonies in the middle of which he is brought and received at the place of the sacrifice. One carries him on a bulwark, worships him, then presses him and kills him. » xx

The « sacrifice of the god », whatever its possible metaphysical scope, which is absolutely out of the question here, is never really a « social fact » …

Louis Renouxxi: The Veda was lost in India early on.

Louis Renou emphasizes in his Vedic Studies what he considers to be a « striking paradox » about the Veda.

« On the one hand, we revere him, we recognize in him an omniscient, infallible, eternal principle – something like God in the form of « Knowledge », a God made Book (Bible), an Indian Logos – one refers to him as the very source of Dharma, theauthority from which all Brahmanic disciplines are derived. And on the other hand, the traditions, let us say philological traditions, relating to the Veda, the very substance of the texts that compose it, all this has been weakened early on, if not altered or lost. » xxii

In fact, Renou shows that the sharpest enemies of the Veda proliferated very early on in India itself. For example, he lists the « anti-Vedic attitudes » of the Jainas, the Ājīvika and the Buddhists, the « semi-Vedic tendencies » of the Viṣṇuïtes and the Śivaïtes, or the « a-Vedic » positions of the Śākta and the Tāntrika. Renou reminds us that Rāmakrisna has taught: « Truth is not in the Vedas; one must act according to the Tantras, not according to the Vedas; the latter are impure by the very fact that they are pronounced, etc…. « xxiiiand that Tukārām said: « Pride is born from the repetition of the syllables of the Vedaxxiv.

It was with the appearance of the Tantras that the Vedic period came to an end, » explains Renou. It accelerated with a general reaction of Indian society against the ancient Vedic culture, and with the development of popular religiosity that had been bullied by the Vedic cults, as well as with the appearance of Viṣṇuïsme and Śivaïsme and the development of anti-ritualistic and ascetic practices.

The end of the Veda seems to be explained by root causes. From time immemorial it was entrusted to the oral memory of Brahmins, apparently more expert at memorizing its pronunciation and rhythm of cantillation as faithfully as possible than at knowing its meaning or perfecting its interpretations.

Hence this final judgment, in the form of a condemnation: « The Vedic representations ceased early on to be a ferment of Indian religiosity, it no longer recognized itself there where it remained faithful to them. » xxv

From then on, the Vedic world is nothing more than a « distant object, delivered to the vagaries of an adoration deprived of its textual substance. »

And Renou concludes with a touch of fatalism:

« This is a fairly common fate for the great sacred texts that are the foundations of religions. » xxvi

Frits Staalxxvii: Vedic rites make no sense

Frits Staal has a simple and devastating theory: the rite makes no sense. It is meaningless.

What is important in the ritual is what one does, – not what one thinks, believes or says. Ritual has no intrinsic meaning, purpose or finality. It is its own purpose. « In ritual activity, the rules count, but not the result. In ordinary activity, it is the opposite. » xxviii

Staal gives the example of the Jewish ritual of the « red cow »xxix, which surprised Solomon himself, and which was considered the classic example of a divine commandment for which no rational explanation could be given.

Animals also have ‘rituals’, such as ‘aspersion’, and yet they don’t have a language, » explains Staal.

The rites, however, are charged with a language of their own, but it is a language that does not strictly speaking convey any meaning, it is only a « structure » allowing the ritual actions to be memorized and linked together.

The existence of rituals goes back to the dawn of time, long before the creation of structured languages, syntax and grammar. Hence the idea that the very existence of syntax could come from ritual.

The absence of meaning of the rite sees its corollary in the absence of meaning (or the radical contingency) of the syntax.

Frits Staal applies this general intuition to the rites of the Veda. He notes the extreme ritualization of Yajurveda and Samaveda. In the chants of Samaveda, there is a great variety of seemingly meaningless sounds, extended series of O’s, sometimes ending in M’s, which evoke the mantra OM.

Staal then opens up another avenue for reflection. He notes that the effect of certain psychoactive powers, such as those associated with the ritual consumption of soma, is somewhat analogous to the effects of singing, recitation and psalmody, which involve rigorous breath control. This type of effect that can rightly be called psychosomatic even extends to silent meditation, as recommended by Upaniṣad and Buddhism.

For example, controlled inhalation and exhalation practices in highly ritualized breathing exercises can help explain how the ingestion of a psychoactive substance can also become a ritual.

In a previous article I mentioned the fact that many animals enjoy consuming psychoactive plants. Similarly, it can be noted that in many animal species we find some kind of ritualized practices.

There would thus be a possible link to underline between these animal practices, which apparently have no « meaning », and highly ritualized human practices such as those observed in the great sacrificial rites of the Veda.

Hence this hypothesis, which I will try to explore in a future article : the ingestion of certain plants, the obsessive observation of rites and the penetration of religious beliefs have a common point, that of being able to generate psychoactive effects.

However, animals are also capable of experiencing some similar effects.

There is here an avenue for a more fundamental reflection on the very structure of the universe, its intimate harmony and its capacity to produce resonances, especially with the living world. The existence of these resonances is particularly salient in the animal world.

Without doubt, it is also these resonances that are at theorigin of the phenomenon (certainly not reserved to Man) of « consciousness ».

Apparently « meaningless » rites have at least this immense advantage that they are able to generate more « consciousness » .

I would like to add that this line of research opens up unimaginable perspectives, by the amplitude and universality of its implications, at various levels of « life », and from cosmology to anthropology…

Charles Malamoudxxx : Sacrifice is the union of Male and Female.

By a marked and even radical contrast with the already exposed positions of Sylvain Lévi, Charles Malamoud places the Veda at the pinnacle. The Veda is no longer a « grossly barbaric » or « half-wild » paganism, it is in his eyes a « monotheism », not only « authentic », but the « most authentic » monotheism that is, far above Judaism or Christianity !

« The Veda is not polytheism, or even ‘henotheism’, as Max Müller thought. It is the most authentic of monotheisms. And it is infinitely older than the monotheisms taught by the religions of the Book. » xxxi

Once this overall compliment has been made, Charles Malamoud in turn tackles the crux of the matter, the question of Vedic sacrifice, its meaning and nature.

On the one hand, « the rite is routine, and repetition, and it is perhaps a prison for the mind »xxxii. On the other hand, « the rite is to itself its own transcendence »xxxiii. This is tantamount to saying that it is the rite alone that really matters, despite appearances, and not the belief or mythology it is supposed to embody….

« The rites become gods, the mythological god is threatened to be erased and only remains if he manages to be recreated by the rite. Rites can do without gods, gods are nothing without rites. » xxxiv

This position corresponds indeed to the fundamental (and founding) thesis of the Veda, according to which the Sacrifice is the supreme God himself (Prajāpati), and conversely, God is the Sacrifice.

But Charles Malamoud is not primarily interested in the profound metaphysical implications of this double identification of Prajāpati with the Sacrifice.

The question that interests him, more prosaically, is of a completely different nature: « What is the sex of the Sacrifice? » xxxv, he asks …

And the answer comes, perfectly clear:

« The Vedic sacrifice, when assimilated to a body, is unquestionably and superlatively a male. » xxxvi

This is evidenced by the fact, according to Malamoud, that the sequences of the « accompanying offerings », which are in a way « appendages » of the main offering, called anuyajā, are compared to penises (śiśna). The texts even glorify the fact that the Sacrifice has three penises, while the man has only one. xxxvii

Of the « male » body of the sacrifice, the « female » partner is the Word.

Malamoud cites a significant passage from Brāhmaṇas.

« The Sacrifice was taken from desire for the Word. He thought, ‘Ah, how I would like to make love with her! and he joined with her. Indra thought, ‘Surely a prodigious being will be born from this union between the Sacrifice and the Word, and that being will be stronger than I am! Indra became an embryo and slipped into the embrace of the Sacrifice and the Word (…) He grasped the womb of the Word, squeezed it tightly, tore it up and placed it on the head of the Sacrifice. » xxxviii

Malamoud qualifies this very strange scene as « anticipated incest » on the part of Indra, apparently wishing to make the Sacrifice and the Word her surrogate parents…

For us  » westerners « , we seem to be confronted here with a real « primitive scene », in the manner of Freud… All that is missing is the murder…

And yet, murder is not far away.

Crushing soma stems with stones is explicitly considered in Vedic texts as « murder, » Malamoud insists.

« Killing » soma stems may seem like an elaborate metaphor.

It is however the Vedic metaphor par excellence, that of the « sacrifice of God », in this case the sacrifice of the God Soma. The divinized Soma is seen as a victim who is immolated, who is put to death by crushing with stones, which implies a « fragmentation » of his « body », and the flow of his substance, then collected to form the essential basis of the oblation?

This idea of sacrificial « murder » is not limited to soma. It also applies to the sacrifice itself, taken as a whole.

Sacrifice is seen as a « body », subject to fragmentation, dilaceration, dismemberment?

« The Vedic texts say that one kills the sacrifice itself as soon as one deploys it. That is to say, when we move from the sacrificial project, which as a project forms a whole, to its enactment, we fragment it into distinct temporal sequences and kill it. The pebbles praised in this hymn Ṛg-Veda X 94 are the instruments of this murder. » xxxix

If the Word makes a couple with the Sacrifice, it can also make a couple with the Silence, as Malamoud explains: « there is an affinity between silence and sperm: the emission of sperm (netasaḥ siktiḥ) is done silently. » xl

A lesson is drawn from this observation for the manner of performing the rite, – with a mixture of words, murmurs and silences :

« Such a soma extraction must be performed with inaudible recitation of the formula, because it symbolizes the sperm that spreads in a womb »xli.

The metaphor is explicit: it is a question of « pouring the Breath-Sperm into the Word-Matrix ». Malamoud specifies: « In practice, to fecundate the Word by the Breath-Sperm-Silence, this means dividing the same rite into two successive phases: one involving recitation of texts aloud, the other inaudible recitation. » xlii

All this is generalizable. The metaphor of the male/female distinction applies to the gods themselves.

« Agni himself is feminine, he is properly a womb when, at the time of the sacrifice, one pours into the oblatory fire, this sperm to which the soma liquor is assimilated. » xliii

Permanence and universality of the metaphor of copulation, in the Veda… according to Malamoud.

Raimon Panikkarxliv : Sacrifice is the navel of the universe

Panikkar says that only one word expresses the quintessence of Vedic revelation: yajña, sacrifice.

Sacrifice is the primordial act, the Act which makes beings be, and which is therefore responsible for their becoming, without the need to invoke the hypothesis of a previous Being from which they would come. In the beginning, « was » the Sacrifice. The beginning, therefore, was neither the Being nor the Non-Being, neither the Full nor the Empty.

The Sacrifice not only gives its Being to the world, but also sustains it. The Sacrifice is what sustains the universe in its Being, what gives life and hope to life. « Sacrifice is the internal dynamism of the Universe.» xlv

From this idea another, even more fundamental, follows: that the Creator God depends in reality on his own Creation.

« The supreme being is not God by himself, but by creatures. In reality he is never alone. He is a relation and belongs to reality. »xlvi

« The Gods do not exist autonomously; they exist in, with, above, and also through men. Their supreme sacrifice is man, the primordial man. (…) Man is the priest but also the sacrificed; the Gods, in their role as primary agents of sacrifice, offer their oblation with man. Man is not only the cosmic priest; he is also the cosmic victim. »xlvii

The Veda describes Creation as resulting from the Sacrifice of God (devayajña), and the self-immolation of the Creator. It is only because Prajāpati totally sacrifices itself that it can give Creation its own Self.

In doing so, the Divine Sacrifice becomes the central paradigm (or « navel ») of the universe:

« This sacred enclosure is the beginning of the earth; this sacrifice is the center of the world. This soma isthe seed of the fertile horse. This priest is the first patron of the word. » xlviii

The commentator writes:

« Everything that exists, whatever it is, is made to participate in the sacrifice. » xlix

« Truly, both Gods and men and Fathers drink together, and this is their banquet. Once they drank openly, but now they drink hidden.»

*************

The competence of the Indian and Sanskritist scholars cited here is not in question.

The display of their divergences, far from diminishing them, increases in my eyes especially the high idea I have of their analytical and interpretative capacities.

But no doubt the reader will not have escaped the kind of dull irony I have tried to instil through the choice of accumulated quotations.

It seemed to me that the West still has a long way to go to begin to « understand » the East (– here the Vedic Orient).

It so happens that sometimes, in reading some Vedic texts (for example the hymns of the 10th Mandala of Ṛg Veda, and some Upaniṣad), I feel some sort of deep resonances with thinkers and poets who lived several thousands of years ago.

____________________

iEmile Burnouf. Essay on the Veda. Ed. Dezobry, Tandou et Cie, Paris, 1863.

iiEmile Burnouf. Essay on the Veda. Ed. Dezobry, Tandou et Cie, Paris, 1863. p.113

iiiEmile Burnouf. Essay on the Veda. Ed. Dezobry, Tandou et Cie, Paris, 1863. p.112

ivRV iV,415

vEmile Burnouf. Essay on the Veda. Ed. Dezobry, Tandou et Cie, Paris, 1863. p.115

viSylvain Lévi. The doctrine of sacrifice in the Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898.

viiSylvain Lévi. The doctrine of sacrifice in the Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898.p. 9

viiiSylvain Lévi. The doctrine of sacrifice in the Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898.p. 10

ixSylvain Lévi. The doctrine of sacrifice in the Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898.p. 9

xSylvain Lévi. The doctrine of sacrifice in the Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898. p.10-11

xiSylvain Lévi. The doctrine of sacrifice in the Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898. p.11

xiiHenri Hubert and Marcel Mauss. Mixed history of religions. From some results of religious sociology; Sacrifice; The origin of magical powers; The representation of time. Collection: Works of the Sociological Year. Paris: Librairie Félix Alcan, 1929, 2nd edition, 236 pages.

xiiiHenri Hubert and Marcel Mauss. Essay on the nature and function of sacrifice. Article published in the review Année sociologique, tome II, 1899, p.76

xivHenri Hubert and Marcel Mauss. Essay on the nature and function of sacrifice. Article published in the review Année sociologique, tome II, 1899, p.78

xvDoctr, pp. 93-95. We absolutely agree with the rapprochement proposed by M. L., between the Brahmanic theory of escape from death by sacrifice and the Buddhist theory of moksà, of deliverance. Cf. Oldenberg, The Buddha, p. 40.

xviVoir Bergaigne, Rel. Véd., sur l’amrtam « essence immortelle » que confère le scma (I, p. 254 suiv., etc.). Mais là, comme dans le livre de M. Hillebr. Ved. Myth., I, p. 289 et sqq. passim, les interprétations de mythologie pure ont un peu envahi les explications des textes. V. Kuhn, Herabkunft des Feuers und des Göttertranks. Cf. Roscher, Nektar und Ambrosia.

xviiCf. Darmesteter, Haurvetât et Amretât, p. 16, p. 41.

xviiiBoth in dogma (e.g. Irenaeus Ad Haer. IV, 4, 8, 5) and in the most well-known rites; thus the consecration of the host is done by a formula in which the effect of the sacrifice on salvation is mentioned, V. Magani l’Antica Liturgia Romana II, p. 268, etc., etc. – One could also relate to these facts the Talmudic Aggada according to which the tribes who have disappeared in the desert and who have not sacrificed will not have a share in eternal life (Gem. to Sanhedrin, X, 4, 5 and 6 in. Talm. J.), nor the people of a city which has become forbidden for having indulged in idolatry, nor Cora the ungodly. This talmudic passage is based on the verse Ps. L, 5: « Bring me together my righteous who have made a covenant with me by sacrifice. »

xixHenri Hubert and Marcel Mauss. Essay on the nature and function of sacrifice. Article published in the review Année sociologique, tome II, 1899, p.55-56.

xxHenri Hubert and Marcel Mauss. Essay on the nature and function of sacrifice. Article published in the review Année sociologique, tome II, 1899, p.72-73

xxiLouis Renou. The fate of the Veda in India. Vedic and Paninean studies. Volume 6. Ed. de Boccard. Paris. 1960

xxiiLouis Renou. The fate of the Veda in India. Vedic and Paninean studies. Volume 6. Ed. de Boccard. Paris. 1960, p.1

xxiiiThe teaching of Ramakrisna. p. 467, cited in Louis Renou. The fate of the Veda in India. Vedic and Paninean studies. Tome 6. Ed. de Boccard. Paris. 1960, p4.

xxivTrad. of the Pilgrim’s Psalms by G.-A. Deleury p.17

xxvLouis Renou. The fate of the Veda in India. Vedic and Paninean studies. Volume 6. Ed. de Boccard. Paris. 1960, p.77

xxviIbid.

xxviiFrits Staal. Rituals and Mantras. Rules without meaning. Motilar Banasidarss Publishers. Delhi,1996

xxviiiFrits Staal. Rituals and Mantras. Rules without meaning. Motilar Banasidarss Publishers. Delhi,1996, p.8

xxixNo. 19, 1-22

xxxCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005.

xxxiCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.109

xxxiiCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.45

xxxiiiCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.45

xxxivCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.58

xxxvCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.62

xxxviCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.64

xxxviiSB XI,1,6,31

xxxviiiSB III,2,1,25-28, cited in Charles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.55

xxxixCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.146

xlCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.74

xliCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.74

xliiCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.74

xliiiCharles Malamoud. The dance of the stones. Studies on the sacrificial scene in ancient India. Seuil. 2005. p.78

xlivRaimon Panikkar. I Veda. Mantra mañjari. Ed. Bur Rizzali, 2001

xlvRaimon Panikkar. I Veda. Mantra mañjari. Bur Rizzali, ed. 2001, p. 472.

xlviRaimon Panikkar. I Veda. Mantra mañjari. Bur Rizzali, ed. 2001, p. 472.

xlviiRaimon Panikkar. I Veda. Mantra mañjari. Bur Rizzali, ed. 2001, p. 480.

xlviiiRV I,164.35

xlixSB III,6,2,26

L’Occident comprend-il l’Orient ?


L’Occident comprend-il l’Orient? La réponse courte est: non, pas encore.

Depuis plus de deux siècles, l’Occident a produit une phalange (réduite mais fort engagée) d’indianistes, de sanskritistes et de spécialistes du Véda. Leurs traductions, leurs commentaires, leurs recensions et leurs savantes thèses, sont généralement de bonne facture, et font montre d’une érudition de haut niveau. Les départements spécialisés des universités occidentales ont su promouvoir, bon an mal an, d’excellentes contributions à la connaissance de l’énorme masse de documents et de textes, védiques et post-védiques, appartenant à une tradition dont l’origine remonte il y a plus de quatre mille ans.

On est vite frappé cependant par l’éclatante diversité des points de vue exprimés par ces spécialistes sur le sens profond et la nature même du Véda. On est surpris par les différences remarquables des interprétations fournies, et au bout du compte, malgré une onctueuse harmonie de façade, par leur incompatibilité foncière, et leur irréconciliable cacophonie.

.

Pour donner une rapide idée du spectre des opinions, je voudrais citer brièvement certains des meilleurs spécialistes de l’Inde védique.

Il faudrait bien sûr, si l’on voulait être complet, faire un travail de recension systématique de l’ensemble de la recherche en indologie depuis le début du 19ème siècle, pour en déterminer les biais structurels, les failles interprétatives, les cécités et les surdités culturelles…

Faute de temps, je me contenterai de seulement effleurer la question en évoquant quelques travaux significatifs de spécialistes bien connus : Émile Burnouf, Sylvain Lévi, Henri Hubert, Marcel Mauss, Louis Renou, Frits Staal, Charles Malamoud, Raimon Panikkar.

On y trouvera pêle-mêle les idées suivantes, – étonnamment éclectiques et contradictoires…

La Parole védique (Vāk) équivaut au Logos grec et au Verbe johannique.

-La « Bible aryenne » est « grossière » et issue de peuples « demi-sauvages ».

-Le sacrifice du Dieu n’est qu’un « fait social »

-Le Véda s’est perdu en Inde de bonne heure.

-Les rites (notamment védiques ) n’ont aucun sens.

-Le sacrifice représente l’union du Mâle et de la Femelle.

-Le sacrifice est le Nombril de l’Univers.

Émile Burnoufi : le Vāk est le Logos

Actif dans la 2ème moitié du 19ème siècle, Émile Burnouf affirmait que les Aryâs védiques avaient une conscience très claire de la valeur de leur culte, et de leur rôle à cet égard. « Les poètes védiques déclarent qu’ils ont eux-mêmes créé les dieux :‘Les ancêtres ont façonné les formes des dieux, comme l’ouvrier façonne le fer’ (Vāmadéva II,108), et que sans l’Hymne, les divinités du ciel et de la terre ne seraient pas. »ii

L’Hymne védique « accroît la puissance des dieux, élargit leur domaine et les fait régner. »iii

Or l’Hymne, c’est aussi, par excellence, la Parole (Vāk).

Dans le Ṛg-Veda, un hymne célèbreiv porte d’ailleurs ce nom de « Parole ».

En voici des extraits, traduits par Burnouf :

« Je suis sage; je suis la première de celles qu’honore le Sacrifice.

Celui que j’aime, je le fais terrible, pieux, sage, éclairé.

J’enfante le Père. Ma demeure est sur sa tête même, au milieu des ondes (…)

J’existe dans tous les mondes et je m’étends jusqu’au ciel.

Telle que le vent, je respire dans tous les mondes. Ma grandeur s’élève au-dessus de cette terre, au-dessus du ciel même. »

Emile Burnouf commente et conclut:

« Ce n’est pas encore la théorie du Logos, mais cet hymne et ceux qui lui ressemblent peuvent être considérés comme le point de départ de la théorie du Logos. »v

Du Vāk au Logos ! Du Véda au Verbe de l’Évangile de Jean !

Saut plurimillénaire, interculturel, méta-philosophique, trans-religieux !

Rappelons que le Vāk est apparu au moins mille ans avant le Logos platonicien et au moins mille cinq cents ans avant que Jean l’évangéliste utilise le Logos comme métaphore du Verbe divin.

Burnouf force-t-il le trait au-delà de toute mesure?

N’est-ce pas là de sa part un anachronisme, ou pis, un biais fondamental, de nature idéologique, rapprochant indûment des traditions religieuses sans aucun rapport entre elles?

Ou bien, n’est-ce pas plutôt de sa part une intuition géniale ?

Qui le dira ?

Voyons ce qu’en pensent d’autres indianistes…

Sylvain Lévivi : la « Bible aryenne » est « grossière »

Curieuse figure que celle de Sylvain Lévi, célèbre indologue, élève de l’indianiste Abel Bergaigne. D’un côté il semble allègrement mépriser les Brāhmaṇas, qui furent pourtant l’objet de ses études, longues, savantes et approfondies. De l’autre, il leur reconnaît du bout des lèvres une certaine valeur, toute relative.

Qu’on en juge :

« La morale n’a pas trouvé de place dans ce système [des Brāhmaṇas] : le sacrifice qui règle les rapports de l’homme avec les divinités est une opération mécanique qui agit par son énergie intime ; caché au sein de la nature, il ne s’en dégage que sous l’action magique du prêtre. Les dieux inquiets et malveillants se voient obligés de capituler, vaincus et soumis par la force même qui leur a donné la grandeur. En dépit d’eux le sacrifiant s’élève jusqu’au monde céleste et s’y assure pour l’avenir une place définitive : l’homme se fait surhumain. »vii

Nous pourrions ici nous demander pourquoi d’éminents spécialistes comme Sylvain Lévi passent tant de temps, dépensent autant d’énergie, pour un sujet qu’ils dénigrent, au fond d’eux-mêmes?

L’analyse de Sylvain Lévi surprend en effet par la vigueur de l’attaque, le vitriol de certaines épithètes (« religion grossière », « peuple de demi-sauvages »), mêlées, il est vrai, de quelques vues plus positives :

« Le sacrifice est une opération magique ; l’initiation qui régénère est une reproduction fidèle de la conception, de la gestation et de l’enfantement ; la foi n’est que la confiance dans la vertu des rites ; le passage au ciel est une ascension par étages ; le bien est l’exactitude rituelle. Une religion aussi grossière suppose un peuple de demi-sauvages ; mais les sorciers, les magiciens ou les chamanes de ces tribus ont su analyser leur système, en démonter les pièces, en fixer les lois ; ils sont les véritables pères de la philosophie hindoue. »viii

Le mépris pour les « demi-sauvages » se double d’une sorte de dédain plus ciblé pour ce que Lévi appelle, avec quelque ironie, la « Bible aryenne » de la religion védique (rappel : le texte de Lévi date de 1898)  :

«Les  défenseurs de la Bible aryenne, qui ont l’heureux privilège de goûter la fraîcheur et la naïveté des hymnes, sont libres d’imaginer une longue et profonde décadence du sentiment religieux entre les poètes et les docteurs de la religion védique ; d’autres se refuseront à admettre une évolution aussi surprenante des croyances et des doctrines, qui fait succéder un stage de grossière barbarie à une période de délicatesse exquise. En fait il est difficile de concevoir rien de plus brutal et de plus matériel que la théologie des Brāhmaṇas ; les notions que l’usage a lentement affinée et qu’il a revêtues d’un aspect moral, surprennent par leur réalisme sauvage. »ix

Sylvain Lévi condescend cependant à donner une appréciation plus positive, lorsqu’il s’avise de souligner que les prêtres védiques semblent aussi reconnaître l’existence d’une divinité « unique » :

« Les spéculations sur le sacrifice n’ont pas seulement amené le génie hindou à reconnaître comme un dogme fondamental l’existence d’un être unique ; elles l’ont initié peut-être à l’idée des transmigrations.»x

Curieux mot que celui de transmigration, nettement anachronique dans un contexte védique… Tout se passe comme si le Véda (qui n’emploie jamais ce mot très bouddhiste de transmigration…) avait aux yeux de Lévi pour seul véritable intérêt, faute de valeur intrinsèque, le fait de porter en lui les germes épars d’un Bouddhisme qui restait encore à advenir, plus d’un millénaire plus tard…

« Les Brāhmaṇas ignorent la multiplicité des existences successives de l’homme ; l’idée d’une mort répétée n’y paraît que pour former contraste avec la vie infinie des habitants du ciel. Mais l’éternité du Sacrifice se répartit en périodes infiniment nombreuses ; qui l’offre le tue et chaque mort le ressuscite. Le Mâle suprême, l’Homme par excellence (Puruṣa) meurt et renaît sans cesse (…) La destinée du Mâle devait aboutir aisément à passer pour le type idéal de l’existence humaine. Le sacrifice a fait l’homme a son image. Le « voyant » qui découvre par la seule force de son intelligence, sans l’aide des dieux et souvent contre leur gré, le rite ou la formule qui assure le succès, est le précurseur immédiat des Buddhas et des Jinas qui découvrent, par une intuition directe et par une illumination spontanée, la voie du salut. »xi

Le Véda, on le voit, ne serait guère qu’une voie vers le Bouddha, selon Lévi.

Henri Hubert et Marcel Maussxii : Le sacrifice divin n’est qu’un « fait social »

Dans leur célèbre Essai sur la nature et la fonction du sacrifice (1899), Henri Hubert et Marcel Mauss ont entrepris l’ambitieuse et périlleuse entreprise de comparer diverses formes de sacrifices, telles que révélées par des études historiques, religieuses, anthropologiques, sociologiques, touchant l’humanité entière.

Persuadés d’être parvenus à formuler une « explication générale », ils pensent pouvoir affirmer « l’unité du système sacrificiel » à travers toutes les cultures et toutes les époques.

« C’est qu’au fond, sous la diversité des formes qu’il revêt, [le sacrifice] est toujours fait d’un même procédé qui peut être employé pour les buts les plus différents. Ce procédé consiste à établir une communication entre le monde sacré et le monde profane par l’intermédiaire d’une victime, c’est-à-dire d’une chose détruite au cours de la cérémonie. »xiii

L’unité du « système sacrificiel » se révèle principalement comme un « fait social », par l’intermédiaire de « la sacralisation de la victime », laquelle devient une « chose sociale »: « Les notions religieuses, parce qu’elles sont crues, sont ; elles existent objectivement, comme faits sociaux. Les choses sacrées, par rapport auxquelles fonctionne le sacrifice sont des choses sociales, Et cela suffit pour expliquer le sacrifice. »xiv

L’étude d’Hubert et Mauss s’appuie en particulier sur l’analyse comparée des sacrifices védiques et des sacrifices chez les anciens Hébreux.

Ces auteurs s’efforcent de déterminer un principe commun, unifiant des types de sacrifice extrêmement divers. « Au cours de l’évolution religieuse, la notion du sacrifice a rejoint les notions qui concernent l’immortalité de l’âme. Nous n’avons rien à ajouter sur ce point aux théories de Rohde, de MM. Jevons et Nutt sur les mystères grecs, dont il faut rapprocher les faits cités par M. S. Lévi, empruntés aux doctrines des Brahmanasxv et ceux que Bergaigne et Darmesteter avaient déjà dégagés des textes védiquesxviet avestiquesxvii. Mentionnons aussi la relation qui unit la communion chrétienne au salut éternelxviii. (…) Le trait caractéristique des sacrifices objectifs est que l’effet principal du rite porte, par définition, sur un objet autre que le sacrifiant. En effet, le sacrifice ne revient pas à son point de départ ; les choses qu’il a pour but de modifier sont en dehors du sacrifiant. L’effet produit sur ce dernier est donc secondaire. C’est la phase centrale, la sacrification, qui tend à prendre le plus de place. Il s’agit avant tout de créer de l’esprit. »xix

Ce principe d’unité prend toute sa résonance avec le sacrifice du dieu.

« Les types de sacrifice du dieu que nous venons de passer en revue se trouvent réalisés in concreto et réunis ensemble à propos d’un seul et même rite hindou : le sacrifice du soma. On y peut voir tout d’abord ce qu’est dans le rituel un véritable sacrifice du dieu. Nous ne pouvons exposer ici comment Soma dieu se confond avec la plante soma, comment il y est réellement présent, ni décrire les cérémonies au milieu desquelles on l’amène et on le reçoit sur le lieu du sacrifice. On le porte sur un pavois, on l’adore, puis on le presse et on le tue.»xx

Le « sacrifice du dieu », quelle que soit son éventuelle portée métaphysique, dont il n’est ici absolument pas question, n’est jamais au fond qu’un « fait social »…

Louis Renouxxi : Le Véda s’est perdu en Inde de bonne heure.

Louis Renou souligne dans ses Études védiques ce qu’il considère comme un « paradoxe frappant » à propos du Véda.

« D’une part, on le révère, on reconnaît en lui un principe omniscient, infaillible, éternel – quelque chose comme Dieu à forme de « Savoir », Dieu fait Livre (Bible), Logos indien – on s’y réfère comme à la source même du dharma, à l’autorité dont relèvent l’ensemble des disciplines brahmaniques. Et d’autre part, les traditions, disons philologiques, relatives au Véda, la substance même des textes qui le composent, tout cela s’est de bonne heure affaibli, sinon altéré ou perdu. »xxii

En fait, Renou montre que les ennemis les plus aiguisés du Véda ont très tôt proliféré en Inde même. Il énumère par exemple les « attitudes anti-védiques » des Jaïna, des Ājīvika et des Bouddhistes, les « tendances semi-védiques » des Viṣṇuïtes et des Śivaïtes, ou encore les positions « a-védiques » des Śākta et des Tāntrika. Renou rappelle que Rāmakrisna a enseigné : « La vérité n’est pas dans les Véda ; il faut agir selon les Tantra, non selon les Véda ; ceux-ci sont impurs du fait même qu’on les prononce etc… »xxiii et que Tukārām a dit: « Du rabâchage des syllabes du Véda naît l’orgueil »xxiv.

C’est avec l’apparition des Tantra que la période védique a vu sa fin s’amorcer, explique Renou. Elle s’est accélérée avec une réaction générale de la société indienne contre l’ancienne culture védique, et avec le développement de la religiosité populaire brimée jusqu’alors par les cultes védiques, ainsi qu’avec l’apparition du Viṣṇuïsme et du Śivaïsme et le développement des pratiques anti-ritualistes et ascétiques.

La fin du Véda semble s’expliquer par des causes profondes. Il était depuis des temps immémoriaux confié à la mémoire orale de Brahmanes, apparemment plus experts à en mémoriser le plus fidèlement possible la prononciation et le rythme de cantillation qu’à en connaître le sens ou à en perfectionner les interprétations.

D’où ce jugement définitif, en forme de condamnation : « Les représentations védiques ont cessé de bonne heure d’être un ferment de la religiosité indienne, elle ne s’y est plus reconnue là-même où elle leur demeurait fidèle. »xxv

Dès lors, le monde védique n’est plus qu’un « objet lointain, livré aux aléas d’une adoration privée de sa substance textuelle. »

Et Renou de conclure, avec un brin de fatalisme :

« C’est d’ailleurs là un sort assez fréquent pour les grands textes sacrés fondateurs des religions. »xxvi

Frits Staalxxvii : Les rites (védiques) n’ont aucun sens

Frits Staal a une théorie simple et ravageuse : le rite n’a aucun sens. Il est « meaningless ».

Ce qui importe dans le rituel, c’est ce que l’on fait, – non pas ce que l’on pense, ce que l’on croit ou ce que l’on dit. Le rituel n’a pas de sens intrinsèque, de but ni de finalité. Il est son propre but. « Dans l’activité rituelle, les règles comptent, mais pas le résultat. Dans une activité ordinaire, c’est le contraire. »xxviii

Staal donne l’exemple du rituel juif de « la vache rousse »xxix, qui surprenait Salomon lui-même, et qui était considéré comme l’exemple classique d’un commandement divin pour lequel aucune explication rationnelle ne pouvait être donnée.

Les animaux d’ailleurs ont aussi des « rituels », comme celui de l’« aspersion », et pourtant ils ne disposent pas du langage, explique Staal.

Les rites sont cependant chargés d’un langage propre, mais c’est un langage qui ne véhicule pas de sens à proprement parler, c’est seulement une « structure » permettant de mémoriser et d’enchaîner les actions rituelles.

L’existence des rituels remonte à la nuit des temps, bien avant la création de langages structurés, de la syntaxe et de la grammaire. De là l’idée que l’existence même de la syntaxe pourrait venir du rite.

L’absence de sens du rite voit son corollaire dans l’absence de sens (ou la contingence radicale) de la syntaxe.

Frits Staal applique cette intuition générale aux rites du Véda. Il note l’extrême ritualisation du Yajurveda et du Samaveda. Dans les chants du Samaveda, on trouve une grande variété de sons apparemment sans aucun sens, des séries de O prolongés, se terminant parfois par des M, qui évoquent la mantra OM.

Staal ouvre alors une autre piste pour la réflexion. Il remarque que l’effet de certaines puissances psychoactives, comme celles qui sont associées à la consommation rituelle du soma, est en quelque sorte analogue aux effets du chant, de la récitation et de la psalmodie, qui impliquent un contrôle rigoureux du souffle. Ce type d’effet que l’on peut à bon droit qualifier de psychosomatique s’étend même à la méditation silencieuse, telle que recommandée par les Upaniad et le Bouddhisme.

Ainsi les pratiques d’inspiration et d’expiration contrôlées dans les exercices fortement ritualisés de respiration, peuvent aider à expliquer comment l’ingestion d’une substance psychoactive peut aussi devenir un rituel.

Dans un article précédent j’évoquais le fait que de nombreux animaux se plaisent à consommer des plantes psychoactives. De même, on peut noter que l’on trouve dans de nombreuses espèces animales des sortes de pratiques ritualisées.

Il y aurait donc un lien possible à souligner entre ces pratiques animales, qui n’ont apparemment aucun « sens », et les pratiques humaines fortement ritualisées comme celles que l’on observe dans les grands rites sacrificiels du Véda.

D’où cette hypothèse, que je tenterai d’explorer dans un prochain article sur la « métaphysique du singe » : l’ingestion de certaines plantes, l’observation obsessionnelle des rites et l’enfoncement dans des croyances religieuses possèdent un point commun, celui de pouvoir engendrer des effets psychoactifs.

Or les animaux sont aussi capables de ressentir certains effets analogues.

Il y a là une piste pour une réflexion plus fondamentale sur la structure même de l’univers, son intime harmonie et sa capacité de produire des résonances, notamment avec le monde vivant. L’existence de ces résonances est particulièrement saillante dans le monde animal.

Sans doute également, ce sont ces résonances qui sont à l’origine du phénomène (certes pas réservé à l’Homme) de la « conscience ».

Des rites apparemment « sans sens » ont au moins cet immense avantage qu’ils sont capables d’engendre plus de « conscience »…

Détournant ironiquement la célèbre formule rabelaisienne, je voudrais exprimer le fond de ma pensée ainsi :

« Sens sans conscience n’est que ruine de l’âme ».

Et j’ajouterai immédiatement :

« Une conscience sans sens est, – elle est purement et simplement. »

Laissant là ce sujet pour le moment, j’ajoute encore que cette voie de recherche ouvre des perspectives inimaginables, par l’amplitude et l’universalité de ses implications, en divers niveaux, du minéral à l’animal, du cosmique à l’anthropique…

Charles Malamoudxxx : Le sacrifice est l’union du Mâle et de la Femelle.

Par un contraste marqué et même radical avec les positions déjà exposées de Sylvain Lévi, Charles Malamoud place, quant à lui, le Véda au pinacle. Le Véda n’est plus un paganisme « grossièrement barbare » ou « demi-sauvage », c’est à ses yeux un « monothéisme », non seulement « authentique », mais le monothéisme « le plus authentique » qui soit, bien au-dessus du judaïsme ou du christianisme !…

« Le Véda n’est pas un polythéisme, ni même un ‘hénothéisme’, comme le pensait Max Müller. C’est le plus authentique des monothéismes. Et il est infiniment plus ancien que les monothéismes enseignés par les religions du Livre. »xxxi

Ce compliment d’ensemble une fois fait, Charles Malamoud s’attaque à son tour au nœud du problème, la question du sacrifice védique, de son sens et de sa nature.

D’un côté, « le rite est routine, et répétition, et il est peut-être une prison pour l’esprit »xxxii. De l’autre, « le rite est à lui-même sa propre transcendance »xxxiii. Cela revient à dire que c’est le rite seul qui importe en réalité, malgré les apparences, et non la croyance ou la mythologie qu’il est censé incarner…

« Les rites deviennent des dieux, le dieu mythologique est menacé d’effacement et ne subsiste que s’il parvient à être recréé par le rite. Les rites peuvent se passer des dieux, les dieux ne sont rien sans les rites. »xxxiv

Cette position correspond en effet à la thèse fondamentale (et fondatrice) du Véda, selon laquelle le Sacrifice est le Dieu suprême lui-même (Prajāpati), et réciproquement, le Dieu est le Sacrifice.

Mais Charles Malamoud ne s’intéresse pas en priorité aux profondes implications métaphysiques de cette double identification de Prajāpati au Sacrifice.

La question qui l’intéresse, plus prosaïquement, est d’une tout autre nature : «Quel est le sexe du Sacrifice ?»xxxv demande-t-il…

Et la réponse vient, parfaitement claire :

« Le sacrifice védique, quand il est assimilé à un corps, est indubitablement et superlativement un mâle. »xxxvi

En témoigne le fait, selon Malamoud, que les séquences des « offrandes d’accompagnement », qui sont en quelque sorte des « appendices » de l’offrande principale, appelées anuyajā, sont comparées à des pénis (śiśna). Les textes glosent même sur le fait que le Sacrifice a trois pénis, alors que l’homme n’en a qu’un.xxxvii

Du corps « mâle » du sacrifice, le partenaire « féminin » est la Parole.

Malamoud cite à ce propos un passage significatif des Brāhmaṇas.

« Le Sacrifice fut pris de désir pour la Parole. Il pensa : ‘Ah ! Comme je voudrais faire l’amour avec elle !’ Et il s’unit à elle. Indra se dit alors : ‘Sûrement un être prodigieux naîtra de cette union entre le Sacrifice et la Parole, et cet être sera plus fort que moi !’ Indra se transforma en embryon et se glissa dans l’étreinte du Sacrifice et de la Parole (…) Il saisit la matrice de la Parole, la serra étroitement, l’arracha et la plaça sur la tête du Sacrifice. »xxxviii

Malamoud qualifie cette scène fort étrange « d’inceste anticipé » de la part d’Indra, désireux apparemment de faire du Sacrifice et de la Parole ses parents de substitution…

Pour nous autres « occidentaux, nous paraissons confrontés ici à une véritable « scène primitive », à la façon de Freud… Il ne manque plus que le meurtre…

Or, justement le meurtre n’est pas loin.

Écraser les tiges de soma avec des pierres est explicitement considéré dans les textes védiques comme un « meurtre », insiste Malamoud.

« Mettre à mort » des tiges de soma peut semble une métaphore poussée.

C’est pourtant la métaphore védique par excellence, celle du « sacrifice du Dieu », en l’occurrence le sacrifice du Dieu Soma. Le Soma divinisé est vu comme une victime qu’on immole, que l’on met à mort par écrasement à coup de pierres, ce qui implique une « fragmentation » de son « corps », et l’écoulement de sa substance, ensuite recueillie pour constituer la base essentielle de l’oblation…

Cette idée du « meurtre » sacrificiel ne se limite pas au soma. Elle s’applique aussi au sacrifice lui-même, pris dans son ensemble.

Le sacrifice est vu comme un « corps », soumis à la fragmentation, à la dilacération, au démembrement…

« Les textes védiques disent qu’on tue le sacrifice lui-même dès lors qu’on le déploie. C’est-à-dire quand on passe du projet sacrificiel, qui en tant que projet forme un tout, à sa mise en acte, on le fragmente en séquences temporelles distinctes, et on le tue. Les cailloux dont on fait l’éloge dans cet hymne Ṛg-Veda X 94 sont les instruments de ce meurtre. »xxxix

Si la Parole fait couple avec le Sacrifice, elle peut aussi faire couple avec le Silence, comme l’explique Malamoud: « il y a affinité entre le silence et le sperme : l’émission de sperme (netasaḥ siktiḥ) se fait silencieusement. »xl

On tire de ce constat une leçon pour la manière d’accomplir le rite, – avec un mélange de paroles, de murmures et de silences :

« Telle puisée de soma doit être effectuée avec récitation inaudible de la formule afférente, parce qu’elle symbolise le sperme qui se répand dans une matrice »xli.

La métaphore est explicite : il s’agit de « verser le Souffle-sperme dans la Parole-matrice ». Malamoud précise : « Pratiquement, féconder la Parole par le Souffle-Sperme-Silence, cela veut dire diviser un même rite en deux phases successives : l’une comportant récitation de textes à voix haute, l’autre récitation inaudible. »xlii

Tout ceci est généralisable. La métaphore de la distinction masculin/féminin s’applique aux dieux eux-mêmes.

« Agni lui-même est féminin, il est proprement une matrice quand, lors du sacrifice, on verse dans le feu oblatoire, ce sperme auquel est assimilé la liqueur du soma. »xliii

Permanence et universalité de la métaphore de la copulation, dans le Véda… selon Malamoud.

Raimon Panikkarxliv : Le sacrifice est le nombril de l’univers

Panikkar dit qu’un seul mot exprime la quintessence de la révélation védique : yajña, le sacrifice.

Le sacrifice est l’acte primordial, l’Acte qui fait être les êtres, et qui est donc responsable de leur devenir, sans qu’il y ait besoin d’invoquer l’hypothèse d’un Être précédent dont ils proviendraient. Au commencement, « était » le Sacrifice. Le commencement, donc, n’était ni l’Être, ni le Non-Être, ni le Plein ni le Vide.

Non seulement le Sacrifice donne son Être au monde, mais il en assure la subsistance. Le Sacrifice est ce qui maintient l’univers dans son être, ce qui donne vie et espoir à la vie. « Le sacrifice est le dynamisme interne de l’Univers. »xlv

De cette idée en découle une autre, plus fondamentale encore : c’est que le Dieu créateur dépend en réalité de sa propre Création.

« L’être suprême n’est pas Dieu par lui-même, mais par les créatures. En réalité il n’est jamais seul. Il est relation et appartient à la réalité ».xlvi

« Les Dieux n’existent pas de façon autonome ; ils existent dans, avec, au-dessus et aussi par les hommes. Leur sacrifice suprême est l’homme, l’homme primordial. (…) L’homme est le sacrificateur mais aussi le sacrifié ; les Dieux dans leur rôle d’agents premiers du sacrifice, offrent leur oblation avec l’homme. L’homme n’est pas seulement le prêtre cosmique ; il est aussi la victime cosmique. »xlvii

Le Véda décrit la Création comme résultant du Sacrifice du Dieu (devayajña), et de l’auto-immolation du Créateur. C’est seulement parce que Prajāpati se sacrifie totalement lui-même qu’il peut donner à la Création son propre Soi.

Ce faisant, le Sacrifice divin devient le paradigme central (ou le « nombril ») de l’univers :

« Cette enceinte sacrée est le commencement de la terre ; ce sacrifice est le centre du monde. Ce soma est la semence du coursier fécond. Ce prêtre est le premier patron de la parole. »xlviii

Le commentateur écrit à ce sujet :

« Tout ce qui existe, quel qu’il soit, est fait pour participer au sacrifice. »xlix

« En vérité, à la fois les Dieux, les hommes et les Pères boivent ensemble, et ceci est leur banquet. Jadis, ils buvaient ouvertement, mais maintenant ils boivent cachés. »

Conclusion (provisoire).

La compétence des savants indianistes et sanskritistes ici cités n’est pas en cause.

L’étalage de leurs divergences, loin de les diminuer, augmente surtout à mes yeux la haute idée que je me fais de leurs capacités d’analyse et d’interprétation.

Mais sans doute, n’aura pas échappé non plus au lecteur la sorte de sourde ironie que j’ai tenté d’instiller à travers le choix des citations accumulées.

Il m’a paru que, décidément, l’Occident avait encore beaucoup de chemin à faire pour commencer à « comprendre » l’Orient (ici védique), – et réciproquement.

Le seul fait de s’en rendre compte pourrait nous faire collectivement progresser, à la vitesse de la lumière…

Mon intérêt profond pour le Véda est difficile à expliquer en quelques mots. Mais il a quelque chose à voir avec le phénomène de résonance.

Il se trouve que parfois, dans la lecture de quelques textes védiques (par exemple les hymnes du 10ème Mandala du Ṛg Veda, ou certaines Upaniṣad), mon âme entre en résonance avec des penseurs ayant vécu il y a plusieurs milliers d’années.

Ce seul indice devrait suffire.

iEmile Burnouf. Essai sur le Véda. Ed. Dezobry, Tandou et Cie, Paris, 1863.

iiEmile Burnouf. Essai sur le Véda. Ed. Dezobry, Tandou et Cie, Paris, 1863. p.113

iiiEmile Burnouf. Essai sur le Véda. Ed. Dezobry, Tandou et Cie, Paris, 1863. p.112

ivRV iV,415

vEmile Burnouf. Essai sur le Véda. Ed. Dezobry, Tandou et Cie, Paris, 1863. p.115

viSylvain Lévi. La doctrine du sacrifice dans les Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898.

viiSylvain Lévi. La doctrine du sacrifice dans les Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898.p. 9

viiiSylvain Lévi. La doctrine du sacrifice dans les Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898.p. 10

ixSylvain Lévi. La doctrine du sacrifice dans les Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898.p. 9

xSylvain Lévi. La doctrine du sacrifice dans les Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898. p.10-11

xiSylvain Lévi. La doctrine du sacrifice dans les Brāhmanas. Ed. Ernest Leroux.1898. p.11

xii Henri Hubert et Marcel Mauss. Mélanges d’histoire des religions. De quelques résultats de la sociologie religieuse; Le sacrifice; L’origine des pouvoirs magiques; La représentation du temps. Collection : Travaux de l’Année sociologique. Paris : Librairie Félix Alcan, 1929, 2e édition, 236 pages.

xiiiHenri Hubert et Marcel Mauss. Essai sur la nature et la fonction du sacrifice. Article paru dans la revue Année sociologique, tome II, 1899, p.76

xivHenri Hubert et Marcel Mauss. Essai sur la nature et la fonction du sacrifice. Article paru dans la revue Année sociologique, tome II, 1899, p.78

xvDoctr., pp. 93-95. Nous nous rattachons absolument au rapprochement proposé par M. L., entre la théorie brahmanique de l’échappement à la mort par le sacrifice et la théorie bouddhiste de la moksà, de la délivrance. Cf. Oldenberg, Le Bouddha, p. 40

xviVoir Bergaigne, Rel. Véd., sur l’amrtam « essence immortelle » que confère le scma (I, p. 254 suiv., etc.). Mais là, comme dans le livre de M. Hillebr. Ved. Myth., I, p. 289 et sqq. passim, les interprétations de mythologie pure ont un peu envahi les explications des textes. V. Kuhn, Herabkunft des Feuers und des Göttertranks. Cf. Roscher, Nektar und Ambrosia.

xvii Voir Darmesteter, Haurvetât et Amretât, p. 16, p. 41.

xviiiTant dans le dogme (ex. Irénée Ad Haer. IV, 4, 8, 5) que dans les rites les plus connus; ainsi la consécration l’hostie se fait par une formule où est mentionné l’effet du sacrifice sur le salut, V. Magani l’Antica Liturgia Romana II, p. 268, etc. – On pourrait encore rapprocher de ces faits l’Aggada Talmudique suivant laquelle les tribus disparues au désert et qui n’ont pas sacrifié n’auront pas part à la vie éternelle (Gem. à Sanhedrin, X, 4, 5 et 6 in. Talm. J.), ni les gens d’une ville devenue interdite pour s’être livrée à l’idolâtrie, ni Cora l’impie. Ce passage talmudique s’appuie sur le verset Ps. L, 5 : « Assemblez-moi mes justes qui ont conclu avec moi alliance par le sacrifice. »

xix Henri Hubert et Marcel Mauss. Essai sur la nature et la fonction du sacrifice. Article paru dans la revue Année sociologique, tome II, 1899, p.55-56.

xx Henri Hubert et Marcel Mauss. Essai sur la nature et la fonction du sacrifice. Article paru dans la revue Année sociologique, tome II, 1899, p.72-73

xxiLouis Renou. Le destin du Véda dans l’Inde. Études védiques et paninéennes. Tome 6. Ed. de Boccard. Paris. 1960

xxiiLouis Renou. Le destin du Véda dans l’Inde. Études védiques et paninéennes. Tome 6. Ed. de Boccard. Paris. 1960, p.1

xxiiiL’enseignement de Ramakrisna. p. 467, cité in Louis Renou. Le destin du Véda dans l’Inde. Études védiques et paninéennes. Tome 6. Ed. de Boccard. Paris. 1960, p4.

xxivTrad. des Psaumes du pèlerin par G.-A. Deleury p.17

xxvLouis Renou. Le destin du Véda dans l’Inde. Études védiques et paninéennes. Tome 6. Ed. de Boccard. Paris. 1960, p.77

xxviIbid.

xxviiFrits Staal. Rituals and Mantras. Rules without meaning. Motilar Banasidarss Publishers. Delhi,1996

xxviiiFrits Staal. Rituals and Mantras. Rules without meaning. Motilar Banasidarss Publishers. Delhi,1996, p.8

xxixNb. 19, 1-22

xxxCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005.

xxxiCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.109

xxxiiCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.45

xxxiiiCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.45

xxxivCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.58

xxxvCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.62

xxxviCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.64

xxxvii SB XI,1,6,31

xxxviiiSB III,2,1,25-28, cité in Charles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.55

xxxixCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.146

xlCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.74

xliCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.74

xliiCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.74

xliiiCharles Malamoud. La danse des pierres. Études sur la scène sacrificielle dans l’Inde ancienne. Seuil. 2005. p.78

xlivRaimon Panikkar. I Veda. Mantra mañjari. Ed. Bur Rizzali, 2001

xlvRaimon Panikkar. I Veda. Mantra mañjari. Ed. Bur Rizzali, 2001, p. 472

xlviRaimon Panikkar. I Veda. Mantra mañjari. Ed. Bur Rizzali, 2001, p. 472

xlviiRaimon Panikkar. I Veda. Mantra mañjari. Ed. Bur Rizzali, 2001, p. 480

xlviiiRV I,164,35

xlixSB III,6,2,26

Véda et trinité


 

Le Véda a rapport au savoir et à la vision. Le mot sanskrit veda a pour racine vid-, tout comme le mot latin video (je vois). C’est pourquoi il n’est pas intempestif de dire que les Ṛṣi ont « vu » le Veda, comme l’écrit Charles Malamoud.i Pourtant, voir ne suffit pas, il faut aussi entendre. « Faisons l’éloge de la voix, partie immortelle de l’âme » dit Kālidāsa.

Dans le Véda, la parole (vāc) est féminine. Qu’est-ce qui est masculin, alors ? Pour le deviner, on peut s’appuyer sur ce verset du Satabatha-Brāhmana : « Car l’esprit et la parole, quand ils sont attelés ensemble, transportent le Sacrifice jusqu’aux Dieux. »ii

Cette formule védique allie dans la même phrase l’Esprit, le Verbe et le Divin.

Trinité avant l’heure ? Ou constante anthropologique digne d’être observée, se révélant en toute époque profonde ?

iCharles Malamoud. Féminité de la parole. 2005

iiS.B. I,4,4,1