What do we have (yet) to lose?


Gérard de Nerval was imbued with shamanism and orphism. With its calculated, ironic and visionary poetry, Voyage en Orient bears witness to these tropisms.

« They plunged me three times into the waters of the Cocyte » (Antéros).

The four rivers of Hell, who can cross their liquid walls? Can a pale poet cross these bitter barriers, these dark, convulsive masses?

« Et j’ai deux fois vainqueur traversé l’Achéron,

Modulant tour à tour sur la lyre d’Orphée

Les soupirs de la sainte et les cris de la fée.”

(And I have twice a winner crossed the Acheron

Modulating in turn on the lyre of Orpheus

The sighs of the saint and the cries of the fairy.) (El Desdichado)

Nerval’s work is influenced by the tutelary figure of Orpheus, prince of poets, lovers and mystics – explorer of the depths.

Orpheus was dismembered alive by the Bacchae in madness, but continued to sing from the mouth of his beheaded head. His singing had already persuaded Hades to let him leave Hell with Eurydice. The condition was that he did not look at her, until he came out of the world of the dead. Worried about the silence of the beloved, he turned his head when they had arrived at the edge of the world of the living. He lost again, and forever, Eurydice.

Instead of looking at her, he could have talked to her, held her by the hand, or inhaled her scent, to make sure she was there? No, he had to see her, to look at her. As a result, she died.

Why do heroes want to face Hell?

What haunts them is whether death is real, or imaginary. What drives them is the desire to see the loved ones again, though lost forever. In these difficult circumstances, they must acquire special powers, magical abilities. Orpheus’ strengths were music, song and poetry.

Music produces, even in Hell, a form, a meaning, and calls for the poem. Orpheus might have sung:

« Always, under the branches of Virgil’s laurel

The pale hydrangea unites with the green myrtle.  » (Myrto)

Gérard de Nerval was inspired. By what?

From the scattered crumbs, let us deduce the bread that feeds him.

« Man, free thinker! Do you think you’re the only one thinking

In this world where life is bursting into everything?

(…)

Each flower is a soul to nature blooms.

A mystery of love in metal rests.

(…)

Often in the dark being dwells a hidden God

And like a nascent eye covered by his eyelids,

A pure spirit grows under the bark of the stones.  » (Golden Verses)

The poets lose, lost, in the theological assaults. Nerval admits defeat, false hopes and real regret:

« They will return these Gods that you always cry for!

Time will bring back the order of the old days,

The earth shuddered with a prophetic breath…

However, the sibyl with its Latin face

Is asleep under the arch of Constantine

And nothing disturbed the severe gantry.  » (Delfica)

Did Nerval believe in the breath of the sibyl, in the order of the day?

Orpheus, Nerval, prophetic poets.

During the Renaissance, Marsile Ficin presented Orpheus as an explorer of Chaos and a theologian of love.

« Gilded in Argonautics imitating the Theology of Mercury Trismegist, when he sings principles of things in the presence of Chiron and the heroes, that is, angelic men, puts Chaos before the world, & before Saturn, Iupiter and the other gods, within this Chaos, he welcomes Love, saying Love is very ancient, by itself perfect, of great counsel. Plato in Timaeus similarly describes Chaos, and here puts Love. »i

Chaos is before the gods, – before the very sovereign God, Jupiter. And in Chaos, there is Love!

« Finally, in all of us, Love accompanies Chaos, and precedes the world, excites the things that sleep, illuminates the dark ones: gives life to the dead things: forms the unformed, and gives perfection to the imperfect. » ii

This « good news » was first announced by Orpheus.

« But the unique invisible perpetual light of the divine Sun, by its presence, always gives comfort, life and perfection to all things. Of what divinely sang Orpheus saying:

God the Eternal Love all things comforts

And on all of them is spread, animated and supported. »

Orpheus bequeathed to humanity these simple pearls:

« Love is more ancient and younger than other Gods ».

« Love is the beginning and the end. He is the first and last of the gods. »

Merci, Marcile. Perfect, Orpheus.

Finally, Ficin specifies the figure of the last of all the gods: « There are therefore four kinds of divine fury. The first is the Poetic Fury. The second is the Mystical, that is, the Priestly. The third is Divination. The fourth is the Affection of Love. Poetry depends on the Muses: The Mystery of Bacchus: The Divination of Apollo & The Love of Venus. Certainly Soul cannot return to unity unless it becomes unique.” iii

The One. Love. The Union. This is the message Orpheus reports.

To hear it first, Orpheus must have lost Eurydice.

But to hear it, what do we have yet to lose?

iMarsile Ficin. Discours de l’honneste amour sur le banquet de Platon, Oraison 1ère, Ch. 2, (1578)

ii Marsile Ficin. Discours de l’honneste amour sur le banquet de Platon, Oraison 1ère, Ch. 2, (1578)

iii Ibid., Oraison 7, Ch. 14

What do we have to lose?


Gérard de Nerval was imbued with shamanism and orphism. With its calculated, ironic and visionary poetry, Voyage en Orient bears witness to these tropisms.

« They plunged me three times into the waters of the Cocyte » (Antéros).

The four rivers of Hell, who can cross their liquid walls? Can a pale poet cross these bitter barriers, these dark, convulsive masses?

« Et j’ai deux fois vainqueur traversé l’Achéron,

Modulant tour à tour sur la lyre d’Orphée

Les soupirs de la sainte et les cris de la fée.”

(And I have twice a winner crossed the Acheron

Modulating in turn on the lyre of Orpheus

The sighs of the saint and the cries of the fairy.) (El Desdichado)

Nerval’s work is influenced by the tutelary figure of Orpheus, prince of poets, lovers and mystics – explorer of the depths.

Orpheus was dismembered alive by the Bacchae in madness, but continued to sing from the mouth of his beheaded head. His singing had already persuaded Hades to let him leave Hell with Eurydice. The condition was that he did not look at her, until he came out of the world of the dead. Worried about the silence of the beloved, he turned his head when they had arrived at the edge of the world of the living. He lost again, and forever, Eurydice.

Instead of looking at her, he could have talked to her, held her by the hand, or inhaled her scent, to make sure she was there? No, he had to see her, to look at her. As a result, she died.

Why do heroes want to face Hell?

What haunts them is whether death is real, or imaginary. What drives them is the desire to see the loved ones again, though lost forever. In these difficult circumstances, they must acquire special powers, magical abilities. Orpheus’ strengths were music, song and poetry.

Music produces, even in Hell, a form, a meaning, and calls for the poem. Orpheus might have sung:

« Always, under the branches of Virgil’s laurel

The pale hydrangea unites with the green myrtle.  » (Myrto)

Gérard de Nerval was inspired. By what?

From the scattered crumbs, let us deduce the bread that feeds him.

« Man, free thinker! Do you think you’re the only one thinking

In this world where life is bursting into everything?

(…)

Each flower is a soul to nature blooms.

A mystery of love in metal rests.

(…)

Often in the dark being dwells a hidden God

And like a nascent eye covered by his eyelids,

A pure spirit grows under the bark of the stones.  » (Golden Worms)

The poets lose, lost, in the theological assaults. Nerval admits defeat, false hopes and real regret:

« They will return these Gods that you always cry for!

Time will bring back the order of the old days,

The earth shuddered with a prophetic breath…

However, the sibyl with its Latin face

Is asleep under the arch of Constantine

And nothing disturbed the severe gantry.  » (Delfica)

Did Nerval believe in the breath of the sibyl, in the order of the day?

Orpheus, Nerval, prophetic poets.

During the Renaissance, Marsile Ficin presented Orpheus as an explorer of Chaos and a theologian of love.

« Orpheus in Argonautics imitating the Theology of Mercury Trismegist, when he sings the principles of things in the presence of Chiron and the heroes, that is, angelic men, he puts Chaos before the world, & before Saturn, Iupiter and the other gods, and within Chaos, he welcomes Love, saying Love is very ancient, by itself perfect, of great counsel. Plato in Timaeus similarly describes Chaos, and here puts Love. »i

Chaos is before the gods, – before the very sovereign God, Jupiter. And in Chaos, there is Love!

« Finally, in all of us, Love accompanies Chaos, and precedes the world, excites the things that sleep, illuminates the dark ones: gives life to the dead things: forms the unformed, and gives perfection to the imperfect. » ii

This « good news » was first announced by Orpheus.

« But the unique invisible perpetual light of the divine Sun, by its presence, always gives comfort, life and perfection to all things. Of what divinely sang Orpheus, saying:

God the Eternal Love all things comforts

And on all of them is spread, animated and supported. »

Orpheus bequeathed to humanity these simple pearls: « Love is more ancient and younger than other Gods ». « Love is the beginning and the end. He is the first and last of the gods. »

Finally, Ficin specifies the figure of the last of all the gods: « There are therefore four kinds of divine fury. The first is the Poetic Fury. The second is the Mystical, that is, the Sacred. The third is Divination. The fourth is the Affection of Love. Poetry depends on the Muses: The Mystery of Bacchus: The Deviation of Apollo: & The Love of Venus. Certainly Soul cannot return to unity unless it becomes unique. » iii

The One. The Love. The Union. This is the message of Orpheus.

To learn it first, Orpheus had to have lost Eurydice.

To hear it, what do we have to lose?

iMarsile Ficin. Discours de l’honneste amour sur le banquet de Platon, Oraison 1ère, Ch. 2, (1578)

ii Marsile Ficin. Discours de l’honneste amour sur le banquet de Platon, Oraison 1ère, Ch. 2, (1578)

iii Ibid., Oraison 7, Ch. 14

The Egyptian Messiah


Human chains transmit knowledge acquired beyond the ages. From one to the other, you always go up higher, as far as possible, like the salmon in the stream.

Thanks to Clement of Alexandria, in the 2nd century, twenty-two fragments of Heraclitus (fragments 14 to 36 according to the numbering of Diels-Kranz) were saved from oblivion, out of a total of one hundred and thirty-eight.

« Rangers in the night, the Magi, the priests of Bakkhos, the priestesses of the presses, the traffickers of mysteries practiced among men.  » (Fragment 14)

A few words, and a world appears.

At night, magic, bacchae, lenes, mysts, and of course the god Bakkhos.

The Fragment 15 describes one of these mysterious and nocturnal ceremonies: « For if it were not in honour of Dionysus that they processioned and sang the shameful phallic anthem, they would act in the most blatant way. But it’s the same one, Hades or Dionysus, for whom we’re crazy or delirious.»

Heraclitus seems reserved about bacchic delusions and orgiastic tributes to the phallus.

He sees a link between madness, delirium, Hades and Dionysus.

Bacchus is associated with drunkenness. We remember the rubicond Bacchus, bombing under the vine.

Bacchus, the Latin name of the Greek god Bakkhos, is also Dionysus, whom Heraclitus likens to Hades, God of the Infernos, God of the Dead.

Dionysus was also closely associated with Osiris, according to Herodotus in the 5th century BC. Plutarch went to study the question on the spot, 600 years later, and reported that the Egyptian priests gave the Nile the name of Osiris, and the sea the name of Typhon. Osiris is the principle of the wet, of generation, which is compatible with the phallic cult. Typhoon is the principle of dry and hot, and by metonymy of the desert and the sea. And Typhon is also the other name of Seth, Osiris’ murdering brother, whom he cut into pieces.

We see here that the names of the gods circulate between distant spheres of meaning.

This implies that they can also be interpreted as the denominations of abstract concepts.

Plutarch, who cites in his book Isis and Osiris references from an even more oriental horizon, such as Zoroaster, Ormuzd, Ariman or Mitra, testifies to this mechanism of anagogical abstraction, which the ancient Avestic and Vedic religions practiced abundantly.

Zoroaster had been the initiator. In Zoroastrianism, the names of the gods embody ideas, abstractions. The Greeks were the students of the Chaldeans and the ancient Persians. Plutarch condenses several centuries of Greek thought, in a way that evokes Zoroastrian pairs of principles: « Anaxagoras calls Intelligence the principle of good, and that of evil, Infinite. Aristotle names the first the form, and the other the deprivationi. Plato, who often expresses himself as if in an enveloped and veiled manner, gives to these two contrary principles, to one the name of « always the same » and to the other, that of « sometimes one, sometimes the other ». »ii

Plutarch is not fooled by Greek, Egyptian or Persian myths. He knows that they cover abstract, and perhaps more universal, truths. But he had to be content with allusions of this kind: « In their sacred hymns in honour of Osiris, the Egyptians mentioned « He who hides in the arms of the Sun ». »

As for Typhon, a deicide and fratricide, Hermes emasculated him, and took his nerves to make them the strings of his lyre. Myth or abstraction?

Plutarch uses the etymology (real or imagined) as an ancient method to convey his ideas: « As for the name Osiris, it comes from the association of two words: ὄσιοϛ, holy and ἱερός, sacred. There is indeed a common relationship between the things in Heaven and those in Hades. The elders called them saints first, and sacred the second. »iii

Osiris, in his very name, osios-hieros, unites Heaven and Hell, he combines the holy and the sacred.

The sacred is what is separated.

The saint is what unites us.

Osiris joint separated him to what is united.

Osiris, victor of death, unites the most separated worlds there are. It represents the figure of the Savior, – in Hebrew the « Messiah ».

Taking into account the anteriority, the Hebrew Messiah and the Christian Christ are late figures of Osiris.

Osiris, a Christic metaphor, by anticipation? Or Christ, a distant Osirian reminiscence?

Or a joint participation in a common fund, an immemorial one?

This is a Mystery.

iAristotle, Metaph. 1,5 ; 1,7-8

iiPlato Timaeus 35a

iiiPlutarch, Isis and Osiris.

Méditations sur la mort imminente


Phérécyde de Syros, l’oncle et le précepteur de Pythagore, actif au 6ème siècle avant J.-C., est le premier à avoir affirmé que les âmes des hommes sont éternelles, selon Cicéroni. C’est lui prêter beaucoup d’honneur. Il avait été précédé par de nombreux chamans des temps anciens, pour lesquels il était évident, parce qu’ils l’avaient expérimenté en personne, que les âmes humaines peuvent voyager entre les mondes, ceux des vivants et ceux des morts, dans certaines conditions. « Son âme fût tantôt dans l’Hadès et tantôt au contraire, dans les lieux au-dessus de la terre »ii, avait-il écrit, à propos d’un héros mort. Avait-il de ces phénomènes étranges une expérience de première main ? Ou alors ne faisait-il que répéter des histoires venues d’ailleurs, d’un Orient propre à produire moult mystères ?

Selon la Suidas, Phérécyde avait subi l’influence des cultes secrets de la Phénicie. Bien d’autres Grecs tombèrent pour leur part sous le charme des rites chaldéens, comme le rapporte Diodore de Sicile, ou bien sous ceux de l’Éthiopie, décrits par Diogène Laërce, ou encore furent fascinés par la profondeur des traditions antiques de l’Égypte, ainsi que le narre Hérodote avec force détails. Bien des peuples ont cultivé des religions à mystères. Les Mages de la Perse affectionnaient les grottes obscures pour leurs célébrations sacrées ; les Hébreux pratiquaient les mystères de la Kabbale, sans doute bien avant leurs développements tardifs au Moyen Âge ; César, dans sa Guerre des Gaules, décrit ceux des druides.

Benjamin Constant consacre une partie de son livre sur « la religion, considérée dans sa source, ses formes et ses développement », à ce phénomène transnational, pluriculturel, et plusieurs fois millénaire. « Les mystères d’Éleusis furent apportés par Eumolpe, d’Égypte ou de Thrace. Ceux de Samothrace qui servirent de modèle à presque tous ceux de la Grèce furent fondés par une amazone égyptienne (Diodore de Sicile 3.55). Les filles de Danaüs établirent les Thesmophories (Hérodote 2,171 ; 4,172) et les Dionysiaques furent enseignées aux Grecs par des Phéniciens (Hérodote 2,49) ou des Lydiens (Euripide, Les Bacchantes, 460-490). Les mystères d’Adonis pénétrèrent de l’Assyrie par l’île de Chypre dans le Péloponnèse. La danse des femmes athéniennes aux Thesmophories n’était pas une danse grecque (Pollux, Onomast. 4) et le nom des rites Sabariens nous reporte en Phrygie. »iii

Constant note que les noms de Cérès et Proserpine dans la langue des Cabires sont identiques à ceux de la Reine des enfers et de sa fille chez les Indiens, Cérés dérivant de Axieros et Asyoruca, et Proserpine de Axiocersa et Asyotursha. Il cite Creutzer qui affirme, dans ses Mithriaques (III,486), que les formules avec lesquelles on consacrait les initiés grecs (« Konx, Om, Pax ») se trouvent être en réalité des mots sanskrits. Konx (κονξ) vient de Kansha (l’objet du désir), Om est le célèbre monosyllabe védique, et Pax (παξ) vient de Pasha (la Fortune).

D’autres similitudes encore valent d’être soulignées, comme le rôle de la représentation (stylisée) des organes sexuels dans le culte védique et dans les cultes grecs. Constant indique que les Pélages à Samothrace adoraient le phallus, comme le rapporte Hérodoteiv, et qu’aux Thesmophories on mettait en scène une représentation du ctéisv. Les Canéphores Dionysiaques, jeunes filles vierges choisies parmi les meilleures familles, portaient sur la tête, dans des corbeilles, le phallus sacré qu’on approchait des lèvres des candidats à l’initiation.vi « Ce fut par les mystères Lernéens qui se célébraient en Argolide en l’honneur de Bacchus, que s’introduisit l’usage de planter des phallus sur les tombeaux »vii, symboles de la puissance génétique, mais aussi de l’immortalité de l’âme et de la métempsycose. Cicéron parle de l’infamie des mystères Sabariensviii, Ovide et Juvénal décrivent les cérémonies obscènes des fêtes d’Adonisix. Tertullien condamne : « Ce que les mystères d’Eleusis ont de plus saint, ce qui est soigneusement caché, ce qu’on n’est admis à connaître que fort tard, c’est le simulacre du Phallus. »x

Eusèbe de Césarée s’intéresse aussi à ces orgies antiques et cite Clément d’Alexandrie, source bien informée, et ne cachant pas son indignation : « Veux-tu voir les orgies des Corybantes ? Tu n’y verras qu’assassinats, tombeaux, lamentations des prêtres, les parties naturelles de Bacchus égorgé, portées dans une caisse et présentées à l’adoration. Mais ne t’étonne pas si les Toscans barbares ont un culte si honteux. Que dirai-je des Athéniens et des autres Grecs, dans leurs mystères de Déméter ? »xi.

Les deux sexes s’affublent publiquement dans les cultes sacrés des Dioscures à Samothrace et de Bacchus dans les Dionysies. C’est une « fête de la chair crue », dont l’interprétation peut varier sensiblement. On peut décider de n’y voir qu’une simple allusion aux vendanges vinicoles : le corps déchiré de Bacchus figure celui du raisin arraché de la vigne et écrasé sous le pressoir. Cérès est la Terre, les Titans sont les vendangeurs, Rhéa rassemblent les membres du Dieu mis en pièces, qui s’incarne dans le vin composé du jus des grappes.

Mais on peut renverser entièrement la métaphore, et y lire le profond message d’une théophanie de la mort et du sacrifice du Dieu, de son corps démembré et partagé en communion, dans une étrange préfiguration de la mort du Christ, puis de la communion de sa chair et son sang par ses fidèles, aujourd’hui encore, au moment crucial de la messe.

Toujours en une sorte de préfiguration païenne des croyances chrétiennes, avec plus d’un demi-millénaire d’avance, on assiste à la mort et à la résurrection du Dieu : Attys, Adonis, Bacchus et Cadmille meurent et ressuscitent, à l’exemple d’Osiris et de Zagréus, avatar du Dionysos mystique.

On voit par là que les religions à mystères des Grecs doivent presque tout à des cultes bien plus anciens, venus d’Égypte, de Phénicie, de Chaldée, de Mésopotamie, et de plus loin vers l’orient encore.

Il en ressort une question qui n’est pas sans mérite, me semble-t-il: dans quelle mesure le culte chrétien, qui parut quelques sept ou huit siècles plus tard, fut-il influencé par ces anciens cultes païens révérant un Dieu mort en sacrifice pour les hommes, et dont le corps et le sang sont partagés en communion par eux ? « Le Logos comme fils de Dieu et médiateur est bien clairement désigné dans tous les mystères. » affirme à cet égard Benjamin Constant.xii

Mais laissons-là pour l’instant cette question que ne se posaient certes pas, alors, les protagonistes des cérémonies d’initiation, composées de fort nombreux degrés. Les initiés aux petits mystères (μύσται, les « mystes ») restaient cantonnés aux vestibules des temples, seuls les initiés aux grands mystères (ἐπόπται, les « époptes », nom qui s’appliqua par la suite aux « évêques » chrétiens) pouvaient entrer dans le sanctuaire.

Mais quelle était leur motivation ? Quel était ce secret si difficile à obtenir ? Qu’est-ce qui justifiait de supporter stoïquement quatre-vingt degrés d’épreuves (faim, fouet, séjour dans la fange, dans l’eau glacée, et autres supplices…) pour être initié, par exemple, aux mystères de Mithra ?

Ce qui est sûr c’est que ces systèmes d’initiation étaient subversifs, ils ruinaient les bases de l’ordre établi, des religions publiques, faisant proliférer des dieux trop nombreux, trop visibles. Une part de cette révélation dernière, qu’il fallait se battre si longtemps pour découvrir, était l’idée de l’inexistence même de ces dieux homériques, populaires, multipliés, couvrant les péristyles des villes, encouragés par le gouvernement de la plèbe. L’affirmation d’athéisme radical, quant aux dieux du jour, faisait partie des vérités enfin révélées, transmises à un très petit nombre d’élus seulement.

« Le secret ne résidait ni dans les traditions, ni dans les fables, ni dans les allégories, ni dans les opinions, ni dans la substitution d’une doctrine plus pure : toutes ces choses étaient connues. Ce qu’il y avait de secret n’était point donc les choses qu’on révélait, c’était que ces choses fussent ainsi révélées, qu’elles le fussent comme dogmes et pratiques d’une religion occulte, qu’elles le fussent progressivement. »xiii

L’initiation était, bien avant l’heure des Lumières modernes, une mise en condition, un entraînement de l’esprit, une ascèse de l’âme, un exercice au doute radical, une mise absolue en abîme. C’était une révélation de l’inanité de toute révélation. Il n’y avait plus, au bout de ce long parcours, d’autres doctrines établies que l’absence de toute doctrine, qu’une négation absolue de toutes les affirmations connues, celles dont on abreuvait le peuple inéduqué. Il n’avait plus de dogmes, mais seulement des signes de reconnaissance, des symboles, des mots de ralliement qui permettaient aux initiés de partager allusivement le sentiment de leur élection à pénétrer les fins dernières.

Mais celles-ci, quelles étaient-elles ? S’il fallait se libérer de tous les dieux connus et de tous les dogmes, que restait-il à croire ?

Que les hommes vont au ciel, et que les Dieux sont allés sur la terre.

Cicéron en témoigne, dans un échange avec un initié : « En un mot,  et pour éviter un plus long détail,  n’est-ce pas les hommes qui ont peuplé le ciel? Si je fouillais dans l’antiquité,  et que je prisse à tâche d’approfondir les histoires des Grecs,  nous trouverions que ceux même d’entre les Dieux,  à qui l’on donne le premier rang, ont vécu sur la terre,  avant que d’aller au ciel. Informez-vous quels sont ceux de ces Dieux,  dont les tombeaux se montrent en Grèce. Puisque vous êtes initié aux mystères,  rappelez-vous en les traditions. »xiv

Cicéron nous encourage à reconnaître que le plus grand des mystères est celui de notre âme, et que le sanctuaire le plus sacré n’est donc pas si inaccessible, puisqu’il est si proche, quoique enfoui au plus profond de notre intimité, au centre de notre âme même.

« Et véritablement il n’y a rien de si grand,  que de voir avec les yeux de l’âme,  l’âme elle-même. Aussi est-ce là le sens de l’oracle,  qui veut que chacun se connaisse. Sans doute qu’Apollon n’a point prétendu par là nous dire de connaître notre corps,  notre taille,  notre figure. Car qui dit nous,  ne dit pas notre corps; et quand je parle à vous,  ce n’est pas à votre corps que je parle. Quand donc l’oracle nous dit: Connais-toi,  il entend,  Connais ton âme. Votre corps n’est,  pour ainsi dire,  que le vaisseau,  que le domicile de votre âme. » xv

Cicéron, dans le sommet de son art, est modeste. Il sait qu’il doit tout ce qu’il croit à Platon. Cela se résume à quelques phrases incisives, à la logique précise, chirurgicale : « L’âme sent qu’elle se meut : elle sent que ce n’est pas dépendamment d’une cause étrangère, mais que c’est par elle-même, et par sa propre vertu; il ne peut jamais arriver qu’elle se manque à elle-même, la voilà donc immortelle. Auriez-vous quelque objection à me faire là-contre ? »xvi

Si l’on trouve le raisonnement elliptique, on peut en lire la version plus élaborée, telle que développée par Platon dans le Phèdre , tel que cité par Cicéron dans ses Tusculanes :

«Un être qui se meut toujours,  existera toujours. Mais celui qui donne le mouvement à un autre,  et qui le reçoit lui-même d’un autre,  cesse nécessairement d’exister,  lorsqu’il perd son mouvement. Il n’y a donc que l’être mû par sa propre vertu,  qui ne perde jamais son mouvement,  parce qu’il ne se manque jamais à lui-même. Et de plus il est pour toutes les autres choses qui ont du mouvement,  la source et le principe du mouvement qu’elles ont. Or,  qui dit principe,  dit ce qui n’a point d’origine. Car c’est du principe que tout vient,  et le principe ne saurait venir de nulle autre chose. Il ne serait pas principe,  s’il venait d’ailleurs. Et n’ayant point d’origine,  il n’aura par conséquent point de fin. Car il ne pourrait,  étant détruit,  ni être lui-même reproduit par un autre principe,  ni en produire un autre,  puisqu’un principe ne suppose rien d’antérieur. Ainsi le principe du mouvement est dans l’être mû par sa propre vertu. Principe qui ne saurait être ni produit ni détruit. Autrement il faut que le ciel et la terre soient bouleversés,  et,  qu’ils tombent dans un éternel repos,  sans pouvoir jamais recouvrer une force,  qui,  comme auparavant,  les fasse mouvoir. Il est donc évident,  que ce qui se meut par sa propre vertu,  existera toujours. Et peut-on nier que la faculté de se mouvoir ainsi ne soit un attribut de l’âme? Car tout ce qui n’est mû que par une cause étrangère,  est inanimé. Mais ce qui est animé,  est mû par sa propre vertu,  par son action intérieure. Telle est la nature de l’âme,  telle est sa propriété. Donc l’âme étant,  de tout ce qui existe,  la seule chose qui se meuve toujours elle-même,  concluons de là qu’elle n’est point née,  et qu’elle ne mourra jamais ». xvii

Est-on assez satisfait ? En faut-il plus ? Nous sommes encore loin des Dieux.Ou peut-être beaucoup plus proches qu’on ne le suppose. C’est Euripide qui a osé la formule la plus audacieuse en cette matière : « Immortalité,  sagesse,  intelligence,  mémoire. Puisque notre âme rassemble ces perfections,  elle est par conséquent divine,  comme je le dis. Ou même c’est un Dieu,  comme Euripide a osé le dire. »xviii

L’âme est une sorte de soleil. Cicéron rapporte les dernières paroles de Socrate, quelques instants avant de boire la ciguë : « Toute la vie des philosophes est une continuelle méditation de la mort ». C’était son chant du cygne. On a consacré les cygnes à Apollon, parce qu’ils semblent tenir de lui l’art de connaître l’avenir. Prévoyant de quels avantages la mort est suivie, les cygnes meurent avec volupté, tout en chantant. De même Socrate, qui prit le temps de rappeler cette métaphore devant ses disciples assemblés, chanta d’un chant inoubliable, et affronta son doute ultime, devant la mort imminente, avec le sourire du sage: « Quand on regarde trop fixement le soleil couchant, on en vient à ne voir plus. Et de même, quand notre âme se regarde,  son intelligence vient quelquefois à s’émousser; en sorte que nos pensées se brouillent. On ne sait plus à quoi se fixer, on retombe d’un doute dans un autre,  et nos raisonnements ont aussi peu de consistance; qu’un navire battu par les flots.» Mais ce doute même, cet aveuglement, ce brouillage ultime, quand on approche de la révélation, vient seulement de la trop grande force de ce soleil intérieur, que les yeux faibles de l’esprit ne peuvent supporter.

Concluons ici avec Cicéron. Détacher l’esprit du corps, c’est apprendre à mourir. Séparons-nous de nos corps par la puissance de l’âme, et accoutumons-nous ainsi à mourir. Par ce moyen, notre vie tiendra déjà d’une vie céleste, et nous en serons mieux disposés à prendre notre essor, quand nos chaînes se briseront. 

i« À ce qu’attestent les documents écrits, Phérécyde de Syros a été le premier à avoir dit que les âmes des hommes sont éternelles. » Cicéron, Tusculanes, I, 16, 38.

iiPhérécyde de Syros, fragment B 22, trad. G. Colli, La sagesse grecque, t. 2, p. 103 : scholies d’Apollonios de Rhodes, I, 643-648.

iiiBenjamin Constant. De la religion considérée dans sa source, ses formes et ses développements. 1831. Livre 13, ch.12

ivHérodote, Histoire 2,51 :  « Les Hellènes tiennent donc des Égyptiens ces rites usités parmi eux, ainsi que plusieurs autres dont je parlerai dans la suite ; mais ce n’est point d’après ces peuples qu’ils donnent aux statues de Mercure une attitude indécente. Les Athéniens ont pris les premiers cet usage des Pélasges ; le reste de la Grèce a suivi leur exemple. Les Pélasges demeuraient en effet dans le même canton que les Athéniens, qui, dès ce temps-là, étaient au nombre des Hellènes ; et c’est pour cela qu’ils commencèrent alors à être réputés Hellènes eux-mêmes. Quiconque est initié dans les mystères des Cabires, que célèbrent les Samothraces, comprend ce que je dis ; car ces Pélasges qui vinrent demeurer avec les Athéniens habitaient auparavant la Samothrace, et c’est d’eux que les peuples de cette île ont pris leurs mystères. Les Athéniens sont donc les premiers d’entre les Hellènes qui aient appris des Pélasges à faire des statues de Mercure dans l’état que nous venons de représenter. Les Pélasges en donnent une raison sacrée, que l’on trouve expliquée dans les mystères de Samothrace. » Trad. Pierre-Henri Larcher volumes. Paris, Lefevre et Charpentier 1842.

vCf. Théodoret, Serm. 7 et 12. Le ctéis est un mot grec qui signifie littéralement « peigne à dents » mais qui désigne aussi de façon figurée le pubis de la femme, et signifie également « coupe, calice ».

viThéodoret, Therapeut. Disput. 1, cité par B. Constant in op.cit. Livre 13, ch.2

viiB. Constant in op.cit. Livre 13, ch.2

viiiCicéron, De Nat. Deo III,13

ixOvide, De Art. Amand. I, 75. Juvénal Sat. VI. In op.cit

xTertullien. Ad. Valent.

xiCité par B. Constant in op.cit. Livre 13, ch.2

xiiB. Constant in op.cit. Livre 13, ch.6

xiiiB. Constant in op.cit. Livre 13, ch.8

xivCicéron. Tusculanes I, 12-13

xvCicéron. Tusculanes I, 22

xviCicéron. Tusculanes I, 23

xviiCicéron. Tusculanes I, 23

xviiiCicéron. Tusculanes I, 26

Le Messie égyptien


 

Des chaînes humaines transmettent les savoir acquis au-delà des âges. De l’une à l’autre, on remonte toujours plus haut, aussi loin que possible, comme le saumon le torrent.

Grâce à Clément d’Alexandrie, au 2ème siècle, on a sauvé de l’oubli vingt-deux fragments d’Héraclite (les fragments 14 à 36 selon la numérotation de Diels-Kranz), sur un total de cent trente-huit.

« Rôdeurs dans la nuit, les Mages, les prêtres de Bakkhos, les prêtresses des pressoirs, les trafiquants de mystères pratiqués parmi les hommes. » (Fragment 14)

Quelques mots, et un monde apparaît.

La nuit, la Magie, les bacchantes, les lènes, les mystes, et bien sûr le dieu Bakkhos.

Le fragment N°15 décrit l’une de ces cérémonies mystérieuses et nocturnes: « Car si ce n’était pas en l’honneur de Dionysos qu’ils faisaient une procession et chantaient le honteux hymne phallique, ils agiraient de la manière la plus éhontée. Mais c’est le même, Hadès ou Dionysos, pour qui l’on est en folie ou en délire. »

Héraclite semble réservé à l’égard des délires bacchiques et des hommage orgiaques au phallus.

Il voit un lien entre la folie, le délire, Hadès et Dionysos.

Bacchus est associé à l’ivresse. On a en mémoire des Bacchus rubiconds, faisant bombance sous la treille.

Bacchus, nom latin du dieu grec Bakkhos, est aussi Dionysos, qu’Héraclite assimile à Hadès, Dieu des Enfers, Dieu des morts.

Dionysos était aussi étroitement associé à Osiris, selon Hérodote au 5ème siècle av. J.-C. Plutarque est aller étudier la question sur place, 600 ans plus tard, et il rapporte que les prêtres égyptiens donnent au Nil le nom d’Osiris, et à la mer, celui de Typhon. Osiris est le principe de l’humide, de la génération, ce qui est compatible avec le culte phallique. Typhon est le principe du sec et du brûlant, et par métonymie du désert et de la mer. Et Typhon est aussi l’autre nom de Seth, le frère assassin d’Osiris, qu’il a découpé en morceaux.

On voit là que les noms des dieux circulent entre des sphères de sens éloignées.

On en induit qu’ils peuvent aussi s’interpréter comme les dénominations de concepts abstraits.

Plutarque, qui cite dans son livre Isis et Osiris des références venant d’un horizon plus oriental encore, comme Zoroastre, Ormuzd, Ariman ou Mitra, témoigne de ce mécanisme d’abstraction anagogique, que les antiques religions avestique et védique pratiquaient abondamment.

Zoroastre en avait été l’initiateur. Dans le zoroastrisme, les noms des dieux incarnent des idées, des abstractions. Les Grecs furent en la matière les élèves des Chaldéens et des anciens Perses. Plutarque condense plusieurs siècles de pensée grecque, d’une manière qui évoque les couples de principes zoroastriens: « Anaxagore appelle Intelligence le principe du bien, et celui du mal, Infini. Aristote nomme le premier la forme, et l’autre, la privationi. Platon qui souvent s’exprime comme d’une manière enveloppée et voilée, donne à ces deux principes contraires, à l’un le nom de « toujours le même » et à l’autre, celui de « tantôt l’un, tantôt l’autre »ii. »

Plutarque n’est pas dupe des mythes grecs, égyptiens ou perses. Il sait qu’ils recouvrent des vérités abstraites, et peut-être plus universelles. Mais il lui faut se contenter d’allusions de ce genre : « Dans leurs hymnes sacrés en l’honneur d’Osiris, les Égyptiens évoquent « Celui qui se cache dans les bras du Soleil ». »

Quant à Typhon, déicide et fratricide, Hermès l’émascula, et prit ses nerfs pour en faire les cordes de sa lyre. Mythe ou abstraction ?

Plutarque se sert, méthode ancienne, de l’étymologie (réelle ou imaginée) pour faire passer ses idées : « Quant au nom d’Osiris, il provient de l’association de deux mots : ὄσιοϛ, saint et ἱερός, sacré. Il y a en effet un rapport commun entre les choses qui se trouvent au Ciel et celles qui sont dans l’Hadès. Les anciens appelaient saintes les premières, et sacrées les secondes. »iii

Osiris, dans son nom même, osios-hiéros, unit le Ciel et l’Enfer, il conjoint le saint et le sacré.

Le sacré, c’est ce qui est séparé.

Le saint, c’est ce qui unit.

Osiris conjoint le séparé à ce qui est uni.

Osiris, vainqueur de la mort, unit les mondes les plus séparés qui soient. Il représente la figure du Sauveur, – en hébreu le « Messie ».

Si l’on tient compte de l’antériorité, le Messie hébreu et le Christ chrétien sont des figures tardives d’Osiris.

Osiris, métaphore christique, par anticipation ? Ou le Christ, lointaine réminiscence osirienne ?

Ou encore participation commune à un fonds commun, immémorial ?

Mystère

iAristote, Metaph. 1,5 ; 1,7-8

iiPlaton. Timée 35a

iiiPlutarque, Isis et Osiris.

Osiris, le Messie égyptien


 

Les chaînes humaines, les passages de relais qui permettent la transmission d’un savoir acquis au-delà des âges, sont fascinants. De l’un à l’autre, on remonte alors toujours plus haut, aussi loin que possible, comme le saumon le torrent. Pour prendre un exemple, partons de Clément d’Alexandrie, un auteur du 2ème siècle. Grand écrivain, profonde culture, sagesse large. C’est grâce à lui que l’on a pu sauver de l’oubli vingt-deux fragments de Héraclite (les fragments 14 à 36 selon la numérotation de Diels-Kranz). C’est beaucoup : vingt-deux sur un total de cent trente-huit… Merci Clément.

Voici le fragment N° 14 : « Rôdeurs dans la nuit, les Mages, les prêtres de Bakkhos, les prêtresses des pressoirs, les trafiquants de mystères pratiqués parmi les hommes. »

En quelques mots, un monde apparaît.

La nuit, la Magie, les bacchantes, les lènes, les mystes, et bien sûr le dieu Bakkhos.

Le fragment N°15 décrit brièvement l’une de ces cérémonies mystérieuses et nocturnes: « Car si ce n’était pas en l’honneur de Dionysos qu’ils faisaient une procession et chantaient le honteux hymne phallique, ils agiraient de la manière la plus éhontée. Mais c’est le même, Hadès ou Dionysos, pour qui l’on est en folie ou en délire. »

On notera au passage la réserve de Héraclite à l’égard des délires bacchiques et des hommage orgiaques au phallus, qui choquaient, semble-t-il, les sages et les philosophes.

On soulignera surtout le lien entre la folie, le délire, la mort et Dionysos/Bakkhos/Bacchus. Bacchus est dans l’imaginaire associé à l’ivresse, et l’on a en mémoire des Bacchus rubiconds, faisant bombance sous la treille. Mais Bacchus, nom latin du dieu grec Bakkhos, est aussi Dionysos, que Héraclite assimile également à Hadès, le Dieu des Enfers, le Dieu des morts.

On sait par ailleurs que Dionysos était étroitement assimilé à Osiris. En tout cas c’était déjà une évidence pour Hérodote au 5ème siècle av. J.-C. Plutarque, qui a étudié la question sur place, 600 ans plus tard, rapporte que les prêtres égyptiens appellent le Nil, Osiris, et la mer, Typhon. Osiris est le principe de l’humide, de la génération, ce qui va bien avec le culte phallique. Typhon est le principe du sec et du brûlant, et par métonymie du désert et de la mer. Et Typhon est aussi l’autre nom de Seth, le frère assassin d’Osiris, qu’il a découpé en morceaux.

On voit par là que les noms de dieux circulent entre des sphères fort éloignées. Ils peuvent aussi s’interpréter, à un niveau plus profond, comme les dénominations de concepts abstraits.

D’ailleurs, Plutarque, qui cite dans son livre Isis et Osiris des références venant d’un horizon plus oriental encore, comme Zoroastre, Ormuzd, Ariman ou Mitra, avait bien compris ce mécanisme anagogique, que les antiques religions avestique et védique pratiquaient abondamment.

Zoroastre avait montré le chemin. Les noms des dieux incarnent des idées, des abstractions. Les Grecs furent en la matière les élèves des Chaldéens et des anciens Perses. Plutarque condense plusieurs siècles de pensée grecque, d’une manière qui évoque les couples de principes zoroastriens: « Anaxagore appelle Intelligence le principe du bien, et celui du mal, Infini. Aristote nomme le premier la forme, et l’autre, la privation1. Platon qui souvent s’exprime comme d’une manière enveloppée et voilée, donne à ces deux principes contraires, à l’un le nom de « toujours le même » et à l’autre, celui de « tantôt l’un, tantôt l’autre »2. »

Plutarque n’est pas dupe des mythes grecs, égyptiens ou perses. Il sait qu’ils cachent des vérités plus abstraites, et peut-être plus universelles. Mais il faut se contenter d’allusions de ce genre : « Dans leurs hymnes sacrés en l’honneur d’Osiris, les Égyptiens évoquent « Celui qui se cache dans les bras du Soleil ». »

Quant à Typhon, déicide et fratricide, Hermès l’émascula, et prit ses nerfs pour en faire les cordes de sa lyre.

Plutarque se sert, méthode ancienne, de l’étymologie (réelle ou imaginée) pour faire passer ses idées : « Quant au nom d’Osiris, il provient de l’association de deux mots : ὄσιοϛ, saint et ἱερός, sacré. Il y a en effet un rapport commun entre les choses qui se trouvent au Ciel et celles qui sont dans l’Hadès. Les anciens appelaient saintes les premières, et sacrées les secondes. »3

Osiris, osios-hiéros, unit en son nom le Ciel et l’Enfer, il conjoint le saint et le sacré.

Le sacré ? C’est ce qui est séparé.

Le saint ? C’est ce qui unit.

Osiris conjoint donc le séparé à ce qui est uni.

Osiris, vainqueur de la mort, unit les mondes, mêmes ceux qui sont les plus « séparés ». Il représente là la figure d’un Sauveur, – qui en hébreu s’appelle le Messie.

On pourrait en déduire aussi que le Messie, ou le Christ, sont des figures osiriennes.

Qu’Osiris soit une métaphore christique, par anticipation, ou que le Christ soit une métaphore osirienne n’épuise pas le mystère.

1 Aristote, Metaph. 1,5 ; 1,7-8

2Platon. Timée 35a

3Plutarque, Isis et Osiris.

Qui a tué Osiris?


64

Les chaînes humaines, les passages de relais qui permettent la transmission d’un savoir acquis au-delà des âges, sont fascinants. De l’un à l’autre, on remonte alors toujours plus haut, aussi loin que possible, comme le saumon le torrent. Pour prendre un exemple, partons de Clément d’Alexandrie, mon auteur favori du 2ème siècle. Grand écrivain, profonde culture, sagesse large. C’est grâce à lui que l’on a pu sauver de l’oubli vingt-deux fragments de Héraclite (les fragments 14 à 36 selon la numérotation de Diels-Kranz). C’est beaucoup : vingt-deux sur un total de cent trente-huit… Merci Clément.

Voici le fragment N° 14 : « Rôdeurs dans la nuit, les Mages, les prêtres de Bakkhos, les prêtresses des pressoirs, les trafiquants de mystères pratiqués parmi les hommes. » On est en plein dans le sujet : la nuit, la Magie, les bacchantes, les lènes, les mystes, et bien sûr le dieu Bakkhos.

Le fragment N°15 décrit brièvement l’une de ces cérémonies mystérieuses et nocturnes: « Car si ce n’était pas en l’honneur de Dionysos qu’ils faisaient une procession et chantaient le honteux hymne phallique, ils agiraient de la manière la plus éhontée. Mais c’est le même, Hadès ou Dionysos, pour qui l’on est en folie ou en délire. »

On notera au passage la réserve implicite de Héraclite à l’égard des délires bacchiques et des hommage orgiaques au phallus, qui choquaient, semble-t-il, les sages et les philosophes.

Mais on soulignera surtout le lien fait par lui entre la folie, le délire, la mort et Dionysos/Bacchus. Bacchus est dans l’imaginaire associé à l’ivresse, et l’on a en mémoire des Bacchus rubiconds, faisant bombance sous la treille. Mais Bacchus, nom latin du dieu grec Bakkhos, est aussi Dionysos, que Héraclite assimile également à Hadès, le Dieu des Enfers, le Dieu des morts.

On sait par ailleurs que Dionysos était étroitement assimilé à Osiris. En tout cas c’était déjà une évidence pour Hérodote au 5ème siècle av. J.-C. Plutarque, qui a étudié la question sur place, 600 ans plus tard, rapporte que les prêtres égyptiens appellent le Nil, Osiris, et la mer, Typhon. Osiris est le principe de l’humide, de la génération, ce qui va bien avec le culte phallique. Typhon est le principe du sec et du brûlant, et par métonymie du désert et de la mer. Et Typhon est aussi l’autre nom de Seth, le frère assassin d’Osiris, qu’il a découpé en morceaux.

On voit par là que les noms de dieux circulent entre des sphères fort éloignées. Ils peuvent aussi s’interpréter, à un niveau plus profond, comme les dénominations de concepts abstraits. D’ailleurs, Plutarque, qui cite dans son livre Isis et Osiris des références venant d’un horizon plus oriental encore, comme Zoroastre, Ormuzd, Ariman ou Mitra, avait bien compris ce mécanisme anagogique, que les antiques religions avestique et védique pratiquaient abondamment. Zoroastre avait montré le chemin. Les noms des dieux incarnent des idées, des abstractions. Les Grecs furent en la matière les élèves des Chaldéens et des anciens Perses. Plutarque condense plusieurs siècles de pensée grecque, d’une manière qui évoque les couples de principes zoroastriens: « Anaxagore appelle Intelligence le principe du bien, et celui du mal, Infini. Aristote nomme le premier la forme, et l’autre, la privation1. Platon qui souvent s’exprime comme d’une manière enveloppée et voilée, donne à ces deux principes contraires, à l’un le nom de « toujours le même » et à l’autre, celui de « tantôt l’un, tantôt l’autre »2. »

Plutarque n’est pas dupe des mythes grecs, égyptiens ou perses. Il sait qu’ils cachent des vérités plus abstraites, et peut-être plus universelles. Mais il faut se contenter d’allusions de ce genre : « Dans leurs hymnes sacrés en l’honneur d’Osiris, les Égyptiens évoquent « Celui qui se cache dans les bras du Soleil ». » Quant à Typhon, déicide et fratricide, Hermès l’émascula, et prit ses nerfs pour en faire les cordes de sa lyre.

Mais il faut ici conclure. Plutarque se sert, méthode ancienne, de l’étymologie (réelle ou imaginée) pour faire passer ses idées : « Quant au nom d’Osiris, il provient de l’association de deux mots : ὄσιοϛ, saint et ἱερός, sacré. Il y a en effet un rapport commun entre les choses qui se trouvent au Ciel et celles qui sont dans l’Hadès. Les anciens appelaient saintes les premières, et sacrées les secondes. »3

Osiris, osios-hiéros, unit en son nom le Ciel et l’Enfer, il conjoint le saint et le sacré.

Le sacré ? C’est ce qui est séparé.

Osiris est donc vainqueur de la mort, et unit les mondes, mêmes ceux qui sont les plus « séparés ». On pourrait dire que le Christ est une figure osirienne, ou qu’Osiris est une métaphore christique, par anticipation. Mais cela n’épuise pas le mystère.

1 Aristote, Metaph. 1,5 ; 1,7-8

2Platon. Timée 35a

3Plutarque, Isis et Osiris.