The Ambiguous Ishmael


– Ishmael and Hagar –

The important differences of interpretation of Ishmael’s role in the transmission of the Abrahamic inheritance, according to Judaism and Islam, focused in particular on the question of the identity of the son of Abraham who was taken to the sacrifice on Mount Moriah. For the Jews, it is unquestionably Isaac, as Genesis indicates. Muslims claim that it was Ishmael. However, the Koran does not name the son chosen for the sacrifice. In fact, Sura 36 indirectly suggests that this son was Isaac, contrary to later reinterpretations of later Islamic traditions.

It may be that, contrary to the historical importance of this controversy, this is not really an essential question, since Ishmael appears as a sort of inverted double of Isaac, and the linked destinies of these two half-brothers seem to compose (together) an allegorical and even anagogical figure – that of the ‘Sacrificed’, a figure of man ‘sacrificed’ in the service of a divine project that is entirely beyond him.

The conflict between the divine project and human views appears immediately when one compares the relatively banal and natural circumstances of the conception of Abram’s child (resulting from his desire to ensure his descent ii, a desire favored by his wife Sarai), with the particularly improbable and exceptional circumstances of the conception of the child of Abraham and Sarah.

One can then sense the tragic nature of the destiny of Ishmael, the first-born (and beloved) son of Abraham, but whose ‘legitimacy’ cannot be compared to that of his half-brother, born thirteen years later. But in what way is it Ishmael’s ‘fault’ that he was not ‘chosen’ as the son of Abraham to embody the Covenant? Was he ‘chosen’ only to embody the arbitrary dispossession of a mysterious ‘filiation’, of a nature other than genetic, in order to signify to the multitudes of generations to come a certain aspect of the divine mystery?

This leads us to reflect on the respective roles of the two mothers (Hagar and Sarah) in the correlated destiny of Ishmael and Isaac, and invites us to deepen the analysis of the personalities of the two mothers in order to get a better idea of those of the two sons.

The figure of Ishmael is both tragic and ambiguous. I will attempt here to trace its contours by citing a few ‘features’ both for and against, by seeking to raise a part of the mystery, and to penetrate the ambiguity of the paradigm of election, which can mean that « the election of some implies the setting aside of others », or on the contrary, that « election is not a rejection of the other ».iii

Elements Against Ishmael :

a) Ishmael, a young man, « plays » with Isaac, a barely weaned child, provoking the wrath of Sarah. This key scene is reported in Genesis 21:9: « Sarah saw the son of Hagar mocked him (Isaac). » The Hebrew word מְצַחֵק lends itself to several interpretations. It comes from the root צָחַק, in the verbal form Piel. The meanings of the verb seem at first glance relatively insignificant:

Qal :To laugh, rto ejoice. As in : Gen 18,12 « Sara laughs (secretly) ». Gen 21:6 « Whoever hears of it will rejoice with me.

Piël : To play, to joke, to laugh. As in Gen 19:14 « But it seemed that he was joking, that he said it in jest. » Ex 32:6 « They stood up to play, or to dance ». Judge 16:25 « That he might play, or sing, before them ». Gen 26:8 « Isaac played or joked with his wife. Gen 39:14 « To play with us, to insult us ».

However, Rashi’s meanings of the word in the context of Gen 21:9 are much more serious: ‘idolatry’, ‘immorality’, and even ‘murder’. « Ridicule: this is idolatry. Thus, ‘they rose up to have fun’ (Ex 32:6). Another explanation: This is immorality. Thus ‘for my own amusement’ (Gen 39:17). Another explanation: this is murder. So ‘let these young men stand up and enjoy themselves before us’ (2 Sam 2:14). Ishmael was arguing with Isaac about the inheritance. I am the elder, he said, and I will take double share. They went out into the field and Ishmael took his bow and shot arrows at him. Just as in: he who plays the foolish game of brandons and arrows, and says: but I am having fun! (Prov 26:18-19).»

Rashi’s judgment is extremely derogatory and accusatory. The accusation of ‘immorality’ is a veiled euphemism for ‘pedophilia’ (Isaac is a young child). And all this derived from a special interpretation of the single word tsaḥaq, – the very word that gave Isaac his name… Yet this word comes up strangely often in the context that interests us. Four important biblical characters ‘laugh’ (from the verb tsaḥaq), in Genesis: Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Ishmael – except Hagar, who never laughs, but cries. Abraham laughs (or smiles) at the news that he is going to be a father, Sarah laughs inwardly, mocking her old husband, Isaac laughs while wrestling and caressing his wife Rebecca (vi), but only Ishmael, who also laughs while playing, is seriously accused by Rashi of the nature of this laughter, and of this ‘game’.

b) According to the commentators (Berechit Rabbah), Ishmael boasted to Isaac that he had the courage to voluntarily accept circumcision at the age of thirteen, whereas Isaac underwent it passively at the age of eight days.

c) Genesis states that Ishmael is a ‘primrose’, a misanthropic loner, an ‘archer’ who ‘lives in the wilderness’ and who ‘lays his hand on all’.

d) In Gen 17:20 it says that Ishmael « will beget twelve princes. « But Rashi, on this point, asserts that Ishmael in fact only begat ‘clouds’, relying on the Midrash which interprets the word נְשִׂיאִים (nessi’im) as meaning ‘clouds’ and ‘wind’. The word nessi’im can indeed mean either ‘princes’ or ‘clouds’, according to the dictionary (vii). But Rashi, for his own reason, chooses the pejorative meaning, whereas it is God Himself who pronounces this word after having blessed Ishmael.

Elements in Favor of Ishmael:

a) Ishmael suffers several times the effects of Sarah’s hatred and the consequences of Abraham’s injustice (or cowardice), who does not defend him, passively obeys Sarah and remorselessly favors his younger son. This has not escaped the attention of some commentators. Ramban (the Nahmanides) said about sending Hagar and Ishmael back to the desert: « Our mother Sarai was guilty of doing so and Abram of having tolerated it ». On the other hand, Rashi says nothing about this sensitive subject.

Yet Abraham loves and cares for his son Ishmael, but probably not enough to resist the pressures, preferring the younger, in deeds. You don’t need to be a psychoanalyst to guess the deep psychological problems Ishmael is experiencing about not being the ‘preferred’, the ‘chosen’ (by God) to take on the inheritance and the Covenant, – although he is nevertheless ‘loved’ by his father Abraham, – just as Esau, Isaac’s eldest son and beloved, was later robbed of his inheritance (and blessing) by Jacob, because of his mother Rebekah, and despite Isaac’s clearly expressed will.

(b) Ishmael is the son of « an Egyptian handmaid » (Genesis 16:1), but in reality she, Hagar, according to Rashi, is the daughter of the Pharaoh: « Hagar was the daughter of the Pharaoh. When he saw the miracles of which Sarai was the object, he said: Better for my daughter to be the servant in such a house than the mistress in another house. » (Commentary of Genesis 16:1 by Rashi)

One can undoubtedly understand the frustrations of a young man, first-born of Abraham and grandson of the Pharaoh, in front of the bullying inflicted by Sarah.

c) Moreover, Ishmael is subjected throughout his childhood and adolescence to a form of disdain that is truly undeserved. Indeed, Hagar was legally married, by the will of Sarah, and by the desire of Abraham to leave his fortune to an heir of his flesh, and this after the legal deadline of ten years of observation of Sarah’s sterility had elapsed. Ishmael is therefore legally and legitimately the first-born son of Abraham, and of his second wife. But he does not have the actual status, as Sarah jealously watches over him.

d) Ishmael is thrown out twice in the desert, once when his mother is pregnant with him (in theory), and another time when he is seventeen years old (being 13 years old at the time of Isaac’s birth + 4 years corresponding to Isaac’s weaning). In both cases, his mother Hagar had proven encounters with angels, which testifies to a very high spiritual status, which she did not fail to give to her son. Examples of women in the Hebrew Bible having had a divine vision are extremely rare. To my knowledge, in fact, there are none, except for Hagar, who had divine visions on several occasions. Rashi notes of Gen 16:13: « She [Hagar] expresses surprise. Could I have thought that even here in the desert I would see God’s messengers after seeing them in the house of Abraham where I was accustomed to seeing them? The proof that she was accustomed to seeing angels is that Manoë when he first saw the angel said, « Surely we will die » (Jug 13:27). Hagar saw angels four times and was not the least bit afraid. »

But to this, we can add that Hagar is even more remarkable because she is the only person in all the Scriptures who stands out for having given not only one but two new names to God: אֵל רֳאִי , El Ro’ï, « God of Vision »viii , and חַי רֹאִי , Ḥaï Ro’ï, the « Living One of Vision »(ix). She also gave a name to the nearby well, the well of the « Living One of My Vision »: בְּאֵר לַחַי רֹאִי , B’ér la-Ḥaï Ro’ï. x

It is also near this well that Isaac will come to settle, after Abraham’s death, – and especially after God has finally blessed him, which Abraham had always refused to do (xii). One can imagine that Isaac had then, at last, understood the depth of the events which had taken place in this place, and with which he had, in spite of himself, been associated.

In stark contrast to Hagar, Sarah also had a divine vision, albeit a very brief one, when she participated in a conversation between Abraham and God. But God ignored Sarah, addressing Abraham directly, asking him for an explanation of Sarah’s behavior, rather than addressing her (xiii). She intervened in an attempt to justify her behavior because « she was afraid, » but God rebuked her curtly: « No, you laughed.

Making her case worse, she herself later reproached Ishmael for having laughed too, and drove him out for that reason.

e) Ishmael, after these events, remained in the presence of God. According to Genesis 21:20, « God was with this child, and he grew up (…) and became an archer. « Curiously, Rashi does not comment on the fact that « God was with this child. On the other hand, about « he became an archer », Rashi notes proudly: « He was a robber… ».

f) In the desire to see Ishmael die, Sarah twice casts spells on him (the ‘evil eye’), according to Rashi. The first time, to make the child carried by Hagar die, and to provoke his abortionxv, and the second time to make him sick, even though he was hunted with his mother in the desert, thus forcing him to drink much and to consume quickly the meager water resources.

g) At the time of his circumcision, Ishmael is thirteen years old and he obeys Abraham without difficulty (whereas he could have refused, according to Rashi, the latter counts to his advantage). Abram was eighty-six years old when Hagar gave birth to Ishmael (Gen 16:16). Rashi comments: « This is written in praise of Ishmael. Ishmael will therefore be thirteen years old when he is circumcised, and he will not object. »

h) Ishmael is blessed by God during Abraham’s lifetime, whereas Isaac is blessed by God only after Abraham’s death (who refused to bless him, knowing that he was to beget Esau, according to Rashi).xvi

i) Ishmael, in spite of all the liabilities of his tormented life, was reconciled with Isaac, before the latter married Rebekah. Indeed, when his fiancée Rebekah arrives, Isaac has just returned from a visitexvii to the Well of the Living of My Vision, near which Hagar and Ishmael lived.

Moreover, his father Abraham ended up « regularizing the situation » with his mother Hagar, since he married her after Sarah’s death. Indeed, according to Rashi, « Qeturah is Hagar. Thus, for the second time, Ishmael is « legitimized », which makes it all the more remarkable that he gives precedence to his younger brother at Abraham’s funeral.

(j) Ishmael lets Isaac take the precellence at the burial of their father Abraham, as we know from Gen 25:9: « [Abraham] was buried by Isaac and Ishmael, his sons. « The preferential order of the names testifies to this.

k) The verse Gen 25:17 gives a final positive indication about Ishmael: « The number of years of Ishmael’s life was one hundred thirty-seven years. He expired and died. « Rashi comments on the expression « he expired » in this highly significant way: « This term is used only in connection with the righteous. »

Let’s now conclude.

On the one hand, Islam, which claims to be a ‘purer’, more ‘native’ religion, and in which the figure of Abraham represents a paradigm, that of the ‘Muslim’ entirely ‘submitted’ to the will of God, – recognizes in Isaac and Ishmael two ‘prophets’.

On the other hand, Ishmael is certainly not recognized as a ‘prophet’ in Israel.

These two characters, intimately linked by their destiny (sons of the same father, and what a father!, but not of the same mother), are also, curiously, figures of the ‘sacrifice’, although in different ways, and which need to be interpreted.

The sacrifice of Isaac on Mount Moriah ended with the intervention of an angel, just as the imminent death of Ishmael in the desert near a hidden spring ended after the intervention of an angel.

It seems to me that a revision of the trial once held against Ishmael, at the instigation of Sarah, and sanctioned by his undeserved rejection outside the camp of Abraham, and the case againt Ishmael should be re-opened.

It seems indispensable, and not unrelated to the present state of the world, to repair the injustice that was once done to Ishmael.

_______________

i Qur’an 36:101-113: « So we gave him the good news of a lonely boy. Then when he was old enough to go with him, [Abraham] said, « O my son, I see myself in a dream, immolating you. See what you think of it. He said, « O my dear father, do as you are commanded: you will find me, if it pleases God, among those who endure. And when they both came together and he threw him on his forehead, behold, We called him « Abraham »! You have confirmed the vision. This is how We reward those who do good. Verily that was the manifest trial. And We ransomed him with a bountiful sacrifice. And We perpetuated his name in posterity: « Peace be upon Abraham. Thus do We reward those who do good, for he was of Our believing servants. And We gave him the good news of Isaac as a prophet of the righteous among the righteous. And We blessed him and Isaac. »

This account seems to indicate indirectly that the (unnamed) son who was taken to the place of the sacrifice is, in fact, Isaac, since Isaac’s name is mentioned twice, in verses 112 and 113, immediately after verses 101-106, which describe the scene of the sacrifice, – whereas the name Ishmael, on the other hand, is not mentioned at all on this occasion. Moreover, God seems to want to reward Isaac for his attitude of faith by announcing on this same occasion his future role as a prophet, which the Qur’an never does about Ishmael.

ii Gen 15, 2-4. Let us note that the divine promise immediately instils a certain ambiguity: « But behold, the word of the Lord came to him, saying, ‘This man shall not inherit you, but he who comes out of your loins shall be your heir. If Eliezer [« this one, » to whom the verse refers] is clearly excluded from the inheritance, the word of God does not decide a priori between the children to come, Ishmael and Isaac.

iiiCourse of Moïse Mouton. 7 December 2019

ivTranslation of the French Rabbinate, adapted to Rachi’s commentary. Fondation S. et O. Lévy. Paris, 1988

« v » Hagar raised her voice, and she cried. (Gen 21:16)

viGn 26.8. Rachi comments: « Isaac says to himself, ‘Now I don’t have to worry anymore because nothing has been done to him so far. And he was no longer on guard. Abimelec looked – he saw them together. »

viiHebrew-French Dictionary by Sander and Trenel, Paris 1859

viiiGn 16.13

ixGn 16, 14: Rachi notes that « the word Ro’ï is punctuated Qamets qaton, because it is a noun. He is the God of vision. He sees the humiliation of the humiliated. »

xGn 16, 14

xi Gn 25.11

xiiiGn 18.13

xivGn 18.15

xvRachi comments on Gen 16:5 as follows: « Sarai looked upon Agar’s pregnancy with a bad eye and she had an abortion. That is why the angel said to Hagar, « You are about to conceive » (Gen 16:11). Now she was already pregnant and the angel tells her that she will be pregnant. This proves that the first pregnancy was not successful. »

xviRachi explains that « Abraham was afraid to bless Isaac because he saw that his son would give birth to Esau. »

xviiGn 24, 62

La figure d’Ismaël. Un paradigme ambigu.


Les importantes divergences d’interprétation du rôle d’Ismaël dans la transmission de l’héritage abrahamique, selon le judaïsme et selon l’islam, se sont focalisées notamment sur la question de l’identité de celui des fils d’Abraham qui a été emmené au sacrifice au mont Moriah. Pour les juifs, c’est sans conteste Isaac, comme l’indique la Genèse. Les musulmans affirment que c’était Ismaël. Or le Coran ne nomme pas le fils choisi pour le sacrifice. Cependant, la sourate 36 laisse entendre indirectement que ce fils était bien, en fait, Isaaci, et cela contrairement aux réinterprétations ultérieures de traditions islamiques plus tardives.

Il se peut d’ailleurs que, contrairement à l’importance qu’a prise historiquement cette controverse, ce ne soit pas là vraiment une question essentielle, tant Ismaël apparaît comme une sorte de double inversé d’Isaac, et tant les destins liés de ces deux demi-frères semblent composer (ensemble) une figure allégorique et même anagogique, – celle du ‘Sacrifié’, une figure de l’homme ‘sacrifié’ au service d’un projet divin qui le dépasse entièrement.

Le conflit entre le projet divin et les vues humaines apparaît d’emblée lorsque l’on compare les circonstances relativement banales et naturelles de la conception de l’enfant d’Abram (résultant de son désir d’assurer sa descendance ii, désir favorisé par sa femme Saraï), avec les circonstances de la conception de l’enfant d’Abraham et de Sara, particulièrement improbables et exceptionnelles.

On pressent alors la nature tragique du destin d’Ismaël, fils premier-né (et aimé), mais dont la ‘légitimité’ ne peut être comparée à celle de son demi-frère, né treize ans plus tard. Mais en quoi est-ce une ‘faute’ imputable à Ismaël que de n’avoir pas été ‘choisi’ comme le fils d’Abraham devant incarner l’Alliance ? N’aurait-il donc été ‘choisi’ que pour incarner seulement la dépossession arbitraire d’une mystérieuse ‘filiation’, d’une nature autre que génétique, et cela pour signifier à l’attention des multitudes de générations à venir un certain aspect du mystère divin ?

Ceci amène à réfléchir sur le rôle respectif des deux mères (Hagar et Sara) dans le destin corrélé d’Ismaël et d’Isaac, et invite à approfondir l’analyse des personnalités des deux mères pour se faire une meilleure idée de celles des deux fils.

La figure d’Ismaël est à la fois tragique et ambiguë. On tentera ici d’en tracer les contours en citant quelques ‘traits’ à charge et à décharge, en cherchant à soulever un pan du mystère, et à pénétrer l’ambiguïté du paradigme de l’élection, pouvant signifier que « l’élection des uns implique la mise à l’écart des autres», ou au contraire, que « l’élection n’est pas un rejet de l’autre »iii.

1 Les traits à charge

a) Ismaël, jeune homme, « joue » avec Isaac, enfant à peine sevré, provoquant la colère de Sara. Cette scène-clé est rapportée en Gn 21,9 : « Sara vit le fils de Hagar se livrer à des railleries »iv. Le mot hébreu מְצַחֵק se prête à plusieurs interprétations. Il vient de la racine צָחַק, dans la forme verbale Piël. Les sens du verbe semblent à première vue relativement anodins :

Qal :Rire, se réjouir.

Gen 18,12 « Sara rit (secrètement) »

Gen 21,6 « Quiconque l’apprendra s’en réjouira avec moi »

Piël : Jouer, plaisanter, se moquer.

Gen 19,14 « Mais il parut qu’il plaisantait, qu’il le disait en se moquant »

Ex 32,6 « Ils se levèrent pour jouer, ou danser ».

Jug 16,25 « Afin qu’il jouât, ou chantât, devant eux ».

Gen 26,8 « Isaac jouait, ou plaisantait, avec sa femme »

Gen 39,14 « Pour se jouer de nous, pour nous insulter ».

Cependant les sens donnés par Rachi à ce mot dans le contexte de Gn 21,9 sont beaucoup plus graves: ‘idolâtrie’, ‘immoralité’, et même ‘meurtre’. « RAILLERIES : il s’agit d’idolâtrie. Ainsi, ‘ils se levèrent pour s’amuser’ (Ex 32,6). Autre explication : Il s’agit d’immoralité. Ainsi ‘pour s’amuser de moi’ (Gn 39,17). Autre explication : il s’agit de meurtre. Ainsi ‘que ces jeunes gens se lèvent et s’amusent devant nous’ (2 Sam 2,14). Ismaël se disputait avec Isaac à propos de l’héritage. Je suis l’aîné disait-il, et je prendrai part double. Ils sortaient dans les champs, Ismaël prenait son arc et lui lançait des flèches. Tout comme dans : celui qui s’amuse au jeu insensé des brandons, des flèches, et qui dit : mais je m’amuse ! (Pr 26,18-19). »

Le jugement de Rachi est extrêmement désobligeant et accusateur. L’accusation d’ ‘immoralité’ est un euphémisme voilé pour ‘pédophilie’ (Isaac est un jeune enfant). Et tout cela à partir du seul mot tsaaq, le mot même qui a donné son nom à Isaac… Or ce mot revient étrangement souvent dans le contexte qui nous intéresse. Quatre importants personnages « rient » (du verbe tsaaq), dans la Genèse : Abraham, Sara, Isaac, Ismaël – sauf Hagar qui, elle, ne rit jamais, mais pleurev. Abraham rit (ou sourit) d’apprendre qu’il va être père, Sara rit intérieurement, se moquant de son vieil époux, Isaac rit en lutinant et caressant son épouse Rebeccavi, mais seul Ismaël qui, lui aussi,rit, en jouant, est gravement accusé par Rachi sur la nature de ce rire, et de ce ‘jeu’.

b) Selon les commentateurs (Berechit Rabba), Ismaël s’est vanté auprès d’Isaac d’avoir eu le courage d’accepter volontairement la circoncision à l’âge de treize ans alors qu’Isaac l’a subie passivement à l’âge de huit jours.

c) La Genèse affirme qu’Ismaël est un ‘onagre’, un solitaire misanthrope, un ‘archer’ qui ‘vit dans le désert’ et qui ‘porte la main sur tous’.

d) Dans Gn 17,20 il est dit qu’Ismaël « engendrera douze princes. » Mais Rachi, à ce propos, affirme qu’Ismaël n’a en réalité engendré que des ‘nuages’, prenant appui sur le Midrach qui interprète le mot נְשִׂיאִים (nessi’im) comme signifiant des ‘nuées’ et du ‘vent’. Le mot nessi’im peut en effet signifier soit ‘princes’ soit ‘nuages’, selon le dictionnairevii. Mais Rachi, pour une raison propre, choisit le sens péjoratif, alors que c’est Dieu même qui prononce ce mot après avoir avoir béni Ismaël.

2 Le dossier à décharge

a) Ismaël subit plusieurs fois les effets de la haine de Sara et les conséquences de l’injustice (ou de la lâcheté) d’Abraham, qui ne prend pas sa défense, obéit passivement à Sara et privilégie sans remords son fils cadet. Ceci n’a pas échappé à l’attention de quelques commentateurs. Comme l’a noté le P. Moïse Mouton dans son cours, Ramban (le Nahmanide) a dit à propos du renvoi de Hagar et Ismaël au désert : « Notre mère Saraï fut coupable d’agir ainsi et Abram de l’avoir toléré ». En revanche Rachi ne dit mot sur ce sujet sensible.

Pourtant Abraham aime et se soucie de son fils Ismaël, mais sans doute pas assez pour résister aux pressions, préférant le cadet, dans les actes. Pas besoin d’être psychanalyste pour deviner les profonds problèmes psychologiques ressentis par Ismaël, quant au fait de n’être pas le ‘préféré’, le ‘choisi’ (par Dieu) pour endosser l’héritage et l’Alliance, – bien qu’il soit cependant ‘aimé’ de son père Abraham, – tout comme d’ailleurs plus tard, Esaü, aîné et aimé d’Isaac, se vit spolié de son héritage (et de sa bénédiction) par Jacob, du fait de sa mère Rebecca, et bien malgré la volonté clairement exprimée d’Isaac.

b) Ismaël est le fils d’« une servante égyptienne » (Gen 16, 1), mais en réalité celle-ci, Hagar, est fille du Pharaon, selon Rachi : « Hagar, c’était la fille du Pharaon. Lorsqu’il a vu les miracles dont Saraï était l’objet, il a dit : Mieux vaut pour ma fille être la servante dans une telle maison que la maîtresse dans une autre maison. » On peut sans doute comprendre les frustrations d’un jeune homme, premier-né d’Abraham et petit-fils du Pharaon, devant les brimades infligées par Sara.

c) De plus Ismaël est soumis pendant toute son enfance et son adolescence à une forme de dédain réellement imméritée. En effet, Hagar a été épousée légalement, de par la volonté de Sara, et de par le désir d’Abraham de laisser sa fortune à un héritier de sa chair, et ceci après que se soit écoulé le délai légal de dix années de constat de la stérilité de Sara. Ismaël est donc légalement et légitimement le fils premier-né d’Abraham, et de sa seconde épouse. Mais il n’en a pas le statut effectif, Sara y veillant jalousement.

d) Ismaël est chassé deux fois au désert, une fois alors que sa mère est enceinte de lui (en théorie), et une autre fois alors qu’il a dix-sept ans (13 ans + 4 ans correspondant au sevrage d’Isaac). Dans les deux cas, sa mère Hagar a alors des rencontres avérées avec des anges, ce qui témoigne d’un très haut statut spirituel, dont elle n’a pas dû manquer de faire bénéficier son fils. Rarissimes sont les exemples de femmes de la Bible ayant eu une vision divine. Mais à ma connaissance, il n’y en a aucune, à l’exception de Hagar, ayant eu des visions divines, à plusieurs reprises. Rachi note à propos de Gn 16,13 : « Elle [Hagar] exprime sa surprise. Aurais-je pu penser que même ici, dans le désert, je verrais les messagers de Dieu après les avoir vus dans la maison d’Abraham où j’étais accoutumé à en voir ? La preuve qu’elle avait l’habitude de voir des anges, c’est que Manoé lorsqu’il vit l’ange pour la première fois dit : Sûrement nous mourrons (Jug 13,27). Hagar a vu des anges à quatre reprises et n’a pas eu la moindre frayeur. »

Mais à cela, on peut encore ajouter que Hagar est plus encore remarquable du fait qu’elle est la seule personne de toute les Écritures à se distinguer pour avoir donné non seulement un mais deux nouveaux noms à la divinité: אֵל רֳאִי El Ro’ï, « Dieu de Vision »viii , et חַי רֹאִי Ḥaï Ro’ï , le « Vivant de la Vision »ix. Elle a donné aussi, dans la foulée, un nom au puits tout proche, le puits du « Vivant-de-Ma-Vision » : בְּאֵר לַחַי רֹאִי , B’ér la-Ḥaï Ro’ï.x C’est d’ailleurs près de ce puits que viendra s’établir Isaac, après la mort d’Abraham, – et surtout après que Dieu l’ait enfin bénixi, ce qu’Abraham avait toujours refusé de fairexii. On peut imaginer qu’Isaac avait alors, enfin, compris la profondeur des événements qui s’étaient passés en ce lieu, et auxquels il avait, bien malgré, lui été associé.

Par un cru contraste avec Hagar, Sara eut aussi une vision divine, quoique fort brève, en participant à un entretien d’Abraham avec Dieu. Mais Dieu ignora Sara, s’adressant à Abraham directement, pour lui demander une explication sur le comportement de Sara, plutôt que de s’adresser à ellexiii. Celle-ci intervint pour tenter de se justifier, car « elle avait peur », mais Dieu la rabroua sèchement : ‘Non, tu as ri’.xiv

Aggravant en quelque sorte son cas, elle reprochera elle-même à Ismaël, par la suite, d’avoir lui aussi ‘ri’, et le chassera pour cette raison.

e) Ismaël, après ces événements, resta en présence de Dieu. Selon le verset Gn 21,20, « Dieu fut avec cet enfant, et il grandit (…) Il devint archer. » Curieusement, Rachi ne fait aucun commentaire sur le fait que « Dieu fut avec cet enfant ». En revanche, à propos de «il devint archer », Rachi note fielleusement : « Il pratiquait le brigandage »…

f) Dans le désir de voir mourir Ismaël, Sara lui jette à deux reprises des sorts (le ‘mauvais œil’), selon Rachi. Une première fois, pour faire mourir l’enfant porté par Hagar, et provoquer son avortementxv, et une deuxième fois pour qu’il soit malade, alors même qu’il était chassé avec sa mère au désert, l’obligeant ainsi à beaucoup boire et à consommer rapidement les maigres ressources d’eau.

g) Lors de sa circoncision, Ismaël a treize ans et il obéit sans difficulté à Abraham (alors qu’il aurait pu refuser, selon Rachi, ce que dernier compte à son avantage). Abram avait quatre-vingt six ans lorsque Hagar lui enfanta Ismaël (Gen 16,16). Rachi commente : « Ceci est écrit en éloge d’Ismaël. Ismaël aura donc treize ans lorsqu’il sera circoncis et il ne s’y opposera pas. »

h) Ismaël est béni par Dieu, du vivant d’Abraham, alors qu’Isaac n’est béni par Dieu qu’après la mort d’Abraham (qui refusa de le bénir, sachant qu’il devait engendrer Esaü, selon Rachi).xvi

i) Ismaël, malgré tout le passif de sa vie tourmentée, se réconcilia avec Isaac, avant que ce dernier n’épouse Rébecca. En effet, lorsque sa fiancée Rébecca arrive, Isaac vient justement de rentrer d’une visitexvii au Puits du ‘Vivant-de-ma-Vision’, près duquel demeuraient Hagar et Ismaël.

Son père Abraham finit d’ailleurs pas « régulariser la situation » avec sa mère Hagar, puisqu’il l’épouse après la mort de Sara. En effet, selon Rachi, « Qetoura c’est Hagar ». Du coup, pour la deuxième fois, Ismaël est donc « légitimé », ce qui rend d’autant plus remarquable le fait qu’il laisse la préséance à son frère cadet lors des funérailles d’Abraham.

j) Ismaël laisse Isaac prendre en effet la précellence lors de l’enterrement de leur père Abraham, ce que nous apprend le verset Gn 25, 9 : « [Abraham] fut inhumé par Isaac et Ismaël, ses fils. » L’ordre préférentiel des noms en témoigne.

k) Le verset Gn 25,17 donne une dernière indication positive sur Ismaël : « Le nombre des années de la vie d’Ismaël fut de cent trente sept ans. Il expira et mourut. » Rachi commente l’expression « il expira » de cette manière, hautement significative: « Ce terme n’est employé qu’à propos des Justes. »

Conclusion

L’Islam, qui se veut une religion plus ‘pure’, plus ‘originaire’, et dont la figure d’Abraham représente le paradigme, celui du ‘musulman’ entièrement ‘soumis’ à la volonté de Dieu, – l’Islam reconnaît en Isaac et Ismaël deux de ses ‘prophètes’.

En revanche, Ismaël n’est certes pas reconnu comme prophète en Israël.

Il ne nous appartient pas de trancher.

D’autant que l’un et l’autre sont, après tout, des personnages somme toute relativement secondaires (ou ‘intermédiaires’), dans les deux traditions coraniques et bibliques, du moins par rapport à des figures comme celles d’Abraham ou de Jacob-Israël.

D’un autre côté, ces deux figures, intimement liées par leur destin (fils du même père, et quel père!, mais pas de la même mère), sont aussi, curieusement, des figures du ‘sacrifice’, quoique avec des modalités différentes, et qui demandent à être interprétées.

Le sacrifice d’Isaac sur le mont Moriah se termina par l’intervention d’un ange, de même que la mort imminente d’Ismaël, au désert, près d’une source cachée, prit fin après l’intervention d’un ange.

Au vu des traits à charge et à décharge dont nous avons tenté une courte synthèse, il semble que devrait s’ouvrir de nos jours, et de toute urgence, une révision du procès jadis fait à Ismaël, sur les instigations de Sara, et sanctionné par son rejet immérité hors du campement d’Abraham.

Il semble indispensable, et non sans rapport avec l’état actuel du monde, de réparer l’injustice qui a été jadis faite à Ismaël, et par rapport à laquelle, quelque ‘élection’ que ce soit ne saurait certes peser du moindre poids.

i Coran 36, 101-113 : « Nous lui fîmes donc la bonne annonce d’un garçon longanime. Puis quand celui-ci fut en âge de l’accompagner, [Abraham] dit : « Ô mon fils, je me vois en songe en train de t’immoler. Vois donc ce que tu en penses ». Il dit : « Ô mon cher père, fais ce qui t’est commandé : tu me trouveras, s’il plaît à Dieu, du nombre des endurants ». Puis quand tous deux se furent , et qu’il l’eut jeté sur le front, voilà que Nous l’appelâmes « Abraham » ! Tu as confirmé la vision. C’est ainsi que Nous récompensons les bienfaisants ». C’était là certes, l’épreuve manifeste. Et Nous le rançonnâmes d’une immolation généreuse. Et Nous perpétuâmes son renom dans la postérité : « Paix sur Abraham ». Ainsi récompensons-Nous les bienfaisants ; car il était de Nos serviteurs croyants. Nous lui fîmes la bonne annonce d’Isaac comme prophète d’entre les gens vertueux. Et Nous le bénîmes ainsi qu’Isaac. »

Ce récit semble indiquer indirectement que le fils (non nommé) qui a été emmené au lieu du sacrifice est bien, en fait, Isaac, puisque le nom d’Isaac y est cité à deux reprises, aux versets 112 et 113, immédiatement après les versets 101-106 qui décrivent la scène du sacrifice, – alors que le nom d’Ismaël en revanche n’est pas cité du tout, à cette occasion. De plus Dieu semble vouloir récompenser Isaac de son attitude de foi, en annonçant à cette même occasion son futur rôle de prophète, ce que ne fait jamais le Coran à propos d’Ismaël.

ii Gn 15, 2-4. Notons que la promesse divine instille d’emblée une certaine ambiguïté : « Mais voici que la parole de l’Éternel vint à lui, disant : ‘Celui-ci n’héritera pas de toi; mais celui qui sortira de tes reins, celui-là sera ton héritier’ ». Si Eliezer [« celui-ci », à qui le verset fait référence] est ici clairement exclu de l’héritage, la parole divine ne tranche pas a priori entre les enfants à venir, Ismaël et Isaac.

iiiCours du P. Moïse Mouton. 7 Décembre 2019

ivTraduction du Rabbinat français, adaptée au commentaire de Rachi. Fondation S. et O. Lévy. Paris, 1988

v« Hagar éleva la voix, et elle pleura ». (Gn 21,16)

viGn 26,8. Rachi commente : « Isaac se dit : maintenant je n’ai plus à me soucier puisqu’on ne lui a rien fait jusqu’à présent. Et il n’était plus sur ses gardes.  Abimelec regarda – il les a vus ensemble. »

viiDictionnaire Hébreu-Français de Sander et Trenel, Paris 1859

viiiGn 16,13

ixGn 16, 14. Rachi fait remarquer que « le mot Ro’ï est ponctué Qamets bref, car c’est un substantif. C’est le Dieu de la vision. Il voit l’humiliation des humilés. »

xGn 16, 14

xiGn 25,11

xiiRachi explique en effet qu’« Abraham craignait de bénir Isaac car il voyait que son fils donnerait naissance à Esaü ».

xiiiGn 18,13

xivGn 18,15

xvRachi commente ainsi Gn 16,5 : « Saraï a regardé d’un regard mauvais la grossesse d’Agar et elle a avorté. C’est pourquoi l’ange dit à Agar : Tu vas concevoir (Gn 16,11). Or elle était déjà enceinte et l’ange lui annonce qu’elle sera enceinte. Ce qui prouve donc que la première grossesse n’avait pas abouti. »

xviRachi explique en effet qu’« Abraham craignait de bénir Isaac car il voyait que son fils donnerait naissance à Esaü ».

xviiGn 24, 62