The Irony of the Bráhman


-Friedrich Max Müller-

One day, according to the Bhagavadgītā (भगवद्गीता), the Supreme Lord came down to reveal to a man named Arjuna, the « most secret wisdom », the « secret of secrets », the « purest knowledge », a « knowledge, queen among all sciences ».

In a few decisive words, human reason was then stripped of everything and reduced to begging. Human nature was compared to « dust », but, more inexplicably, it was also promised to a very high destiny, a putative glory, though still infinitely distant, embryonic, potential. Faced with these impassable mysteries, she was invited to scrutinize endlessly her own background, and her own end.

« This entire universe is penetrated by Me, in My unmanifested form. All beings are in Me, but I am not in them. At the same time, nothing that is created is in Me. See My supernatural power! I sustain all beings, I am everywhere present, and yet, I remain the very source of all creation.»i

We also learn from Bhagavadgītā that the supreme God may descend in person into this world, taking on human form. « Fools denigrate Me when I come down to this world in human form. They know nothing of My spiritual and absolute nature, nor of My total supremacy.»ii

It is not without interest to recall here that the Hebrew Bible, for its part, repeatedly expressed a strangely similar idea. Thus, three « men », posing as « envoys » of the Lord, came to meet Abraham under the oak tree of Mamre. One of them, called YHVH in the Genesis text, spoke to Abraham face to face.

In the Veda, the supreme God is infinitely high, transcendent, absolute, but He is also tolerant. He recognizes that multiple modes of belief can coexist. There are men for whom God is the supreme, original Person. There are those who prostrate themselves before God with love and devotion. There are those who worship Him as the One, and others who worship Him in Immanence, in His presence among the infinite diversity of beings and things, and there are still others who see Him in the Universal. iii

In the Veda, the supreme God is at once unique, absolute, transcendent, immanent, universal; He is All in all.

« But I am the rite and the sacrifice, the oblation to the ancestors, the grass and the mantra. I am the butter, and the fire, and the offering. Of this universe, I am the father, the mother, the support and the grandfather, I am the object of knowledge, the purifier and the syllable OM. I am also the Ṛg, the Sāma and the Yajur. I am the goal, the support, the teacher, the witness, the abode, the refuge and the dearest friend, I am the creation and the annihilation, the basis of all things, the place of rest and the eternal seed (…) I am immortality, and death personified. Being and non-being, both are in Me, O Arjuna ». iv

In his third lecturev on Vedanta given in London in 1894, Max Müller recalled that the Supreme Spirit, the bráhman, ( ब्रह्मन्, a name of the neutral gender, with the tonic accent on the verbal root BRAH-, taken to the full degree – ‘guṇa’) said: « Even those who worship idols worship Me », as reported by Bhagavadgītā.

And Müller added that, within the framework of Vedanta philosophy, the bráhman, this supreme principle, must be distinguished from the brahmán (with the tonic accent on the second syllable), who represents a male agent name meaning « Creator ». According to the Vedanta philosophy, the bráhman could even state of himself: « Even those who worship a personal God in the image of an active creator, or a King of kings, worship Me or, at least, think of Me ».

In this view, the brahmán (the Creator) would be, in reality, only a manifestation of the bráhman (the Supreme Principle). The bráhman also seems to hint here, not without a certain irony, that one could perfectly well support the opposite position, and that would not bother Him…

Here again, with the famous opening of the first verse of Genesis: Bereshit bara Elohim (Gen 1:1), Judaism professed an intuition strangely comparable.

This verse could be read, according to some commentators of the Bereshit Rabbah:  » ‘Be-rechit’ created the Elohim«  (i.e.  » ‘In the principle‘ created the Gods »).

Other commentators even proposed to understand: « With the Most Precious, *** created the Gods ».

I note here by means of the three asterisks the ineffability of the Name of the Supreme Principle (unnamed but implied).

Combining these interpretations, one could understand the first verse of Genesis (berechit bara elohim) in this way:

« The Principle, withthe ‘Most Precious’, created the Elohim. »

The Principle is not named but implied.

The particle be- in the expression be-rechit can mean ‘with’.

One of the possible meanings of the word rechit can be ‘primal fruit’ or ‘most precious’.

For the comparatist, these possibilities (however slight) of convergence between traditions as different as Vedic and Hebrew, are sources of endless meditation and tonic inspiration…

One of the greatest commentator on Vedic heritage, Ādi Śaṅkara (आदि शङ्कर ) explained: « When bráhman is defined in the Upanishads only in negative terms, excluding all differences in name and form due to non-science, it is the superior [bráhman]. But when it is defined in terms such as: « the intelligence whose body is spirit and light, distinguished by a special name and form, solely for the purpose of worship » (Chand., III, 14, 2), it is the other, the lower brahmán. » vi

If this is so, Max Müller commented, the text that says that bráhman has no second (Chand., VI, 2, 1) seems to be contradicted.

But, « No, answers Śaṅkara, because all this is only the illusion of name and form caused by non-science. In reality the two brahman are one and the same brahman, oneconceivable, the other inconceivable, one phenomenal, the other absolutely real ». vii

The distinction made by Śaṅkara is clear. But in the Upanishads, the line of demarcation between the bráhman (supreme) and the brahmán (creator) is not always so clear.

When Śaṅkara interprets the many passages of the Upanishads that describe the return of the human soul after death to ‘brahman‘ (without the tonic accent being distinguished), Sankara always interprets it as the inferior brahmán.

Müller explained: « This soul, as Śaṅkara strongly says, ‘becomes Brahman by being Brahman’viii, that is, by knowing him, by knowing what he is and has always been. Put aside the non-science and light bursts forth, and in that light the human self and the divine self shine in their eternal unity. From this point of view of the highest reality, there is no difference between the Supreme Brahman and the individual self or Ātman (Ved. Sutras, I, 4, p. 339). The body, with all the conditions, or upadhis,towhich it is subordinated, may continue for some time, even after the light of knowledge has appeared, but death will come and bring immediate freedom and absolute bliss; while those who, through their good works, are admitted to the heavenly paradise, must wait there until they obtain supreme enlightenment, and are only then restored to their true nature, their true freedom, that is, their true unity with Brahman. » ix

Of the true Brahman, the Upanishads still say of Him: « Verily, friend, this imperishable Being is neither coarse nor fine, neither short nor long, neither red (like fire) nor fluid (like water). He is without shadow, without darkness, without air, without ether, without bonds, without eyes, without eyes, without ears, without speech, without spirit, without light, without breath, without mouth, without measure, He has neither inside nor outside ».

And this series of negations, or rather abstractions, continues until all the petals are stripped off, and only the chalice, the pollen, the inconceivable Brahman, the Self of the world, remains.

« He sees, but is not seen; He hears, but is not heard; He perceives, but is not perceived; moreover, there is in the world only Brahman who sees, hears, perceives, or knows. » x

Since He is the only one to ‘see’, the metaphysical term that would best suit this Being would be ‘light’.

But this does not mean that Brahman is, in itself, « light », but only that the whole light, in all its manifestations, is in Brahman.

This light is notably the Conscious Light, which is another name for knowledge, or consciousness. Müller evokes the Mundaka Upanishad: « ‘It is the light of lights; when it shines, the sun does not shine, nor the moon nor the stars, nor lightning, much less fire. When Brahman shines, everything shines with Him: His light illuminates the world. Conscious light represents, as best as possible, Brahman’s knowledge, and it is known that Thomas Aquinas also called God the intelligent sun (Sol intelligibilis). For, although all purely human attributes are taken away from Brahman, knowledge, though a knowledge without external objects, is left to Him.»xi

The ‘light’ of ‘knowledge’ or ‘wisdom’ seems to be the only anthropomorphic metaphor that almost all religions dare to apply to the Supreme Being as the least inadequate.

In doing so, these religions, such as Vedic, Hebrew, Buddhist or Christian, often forget what the narrow limits of human knowledge or wisdom are, even at their highest level of perfection, and how unworthy of Divinity these metaphors are in reality.

There is indeed in all knowledge as in all human wisdom an essentially passive element.

This ‘passivity’ is perfectly incompatible with the Divinity… At least, in principle.

One cannot help but notice in several religions the idea of a sort of (active) passivity of the supreme Divinity, who takes the initiative to withdraw from being and the world, for the sake of His creature.

Several examples are worth mentioning here, by order of their appearance on world stage.

-The Supreme Creator, Prajāpati, प्रजापति, literally « Father and Lord of creatures », felt « emptied » right after creating all worlds and beings.

-Similarly, the Son of the only God felt his « emptiness » (kenosis, from the Greek kenos, empty, opposing pleos, full) and his « abandonment » by God just before his death.

-In the Jewish Kabbalah, God also consented to His own « contraction » (tsimtsum) in order to leave a little bit of being to His creation.

In this implicit, hidden, subterranean analogy between the passivity of human wisdom and the divine recess, there may be room for a form of tragic, sublime and overwhelming irony.

The paradox is that this analogy and irony, then, would also allow the infinitesimal human ‘wisdom’ to approach in small steps one of the deepest aspects of the mystery.

___________

iBhagavadgītā 9.4-5

iiBhagavadgītā 9.11

iii« Others, who cultivate knowledge, worship Me either as the unique existence, or in the diversity of beings and things, or in My universal form. « Bhagavadgītā 9,15

ivBhagavadgītā 9.16-19

vF. Max Müller. Introduction to the Vedanta philosophy. Three lectures given at the Royal Institute in March 1894. Translated from English by Léon Sorg. Ed. Ernest Leroux, Paris 1899.

viF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3rd conference, p.39

viiF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3rd conference, p.39-40

viiiIt should probably be specified here, thanks to the tonic accents: « The soul becomes Brahman by being Brahman. « But one could also write, it seems to me, by analogy with the ‘procession’ of the divine persons that Christian theology has formalized: « The spirit becomes Brahman by being Brahman. »

ixF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3rd conference, p. 41

xF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3rd conference, p. 44

xiF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3rd conference, p. 45

L’ironie du bráhman


Un jour, le Seigneur suprême est venu révéler à un homme, du nom d’Arjuna, la « sagesse la plus secrète », le « secret d’entre les secrets », la « connaissance la plus pure », le « savoir, roi entre toutes les sciences », comme l’explique la Bhagavadgītā (भगवद्गीता).

En quelques paroles décisives, la raison humaine s’y voit dépouillée de tout, et réduite à la mendicité. La nature humaine est comparée à de la « poussière », mais, plus inexplicablement, elle est aussi promise à une très haute destinée, une gloire putative, quoique encore infiniment distante, embryonnaire, en puissance. Face à ces mystères indépassables, elle est invitée à scruter sans fin son propre fonds, et sa propre fin.

 

« Cet univers est tout entier pénétré de Moi, dans Ma forme non manifestée. Tous les êtres sont en Moi, mais je ne suis pas en eux. Dans le même temps, rien de ce qui est créé n’est en Moi. Vois Ma puissance surnaturelle ! Je soutiens tous les êtres, Je suis partout présent, et pourtant, Je demeure la source même de toute création. »i

 

On apprend aussi de ce texte que le Dieu suprême peut descendre en personne en ce monde, en empruntant une forme humaine. « Les sots Me dénigrent lorsque sous la forme humaine Je descends en ce monde. Ils ne savent rien de Ma nature spirituelle et absolue, ni de Ma suprématie totale. »ii

 

Il n’est pas sans intérêt de rappeler ici que la Bible hébraïque exprima de son côté, à plusieurs reprises, une idée étrangement analogue. Ainsi, trois ‘hommes’, se présentant comme des ‘envoyés’ de l’Éternel, vinrent à la rencontre d’Abraham sous le chêne de Mambré. L’un d’entre eux, dénommé YHVH dans le texte de la Genèse, prit la parole pour parler en tête-à-tête avec Abraham.

 

Dans le Véda, le Dieu suprême est infiniment élevé, transcendant, absolu, mais Il est aussi tolérant. Il reconnaît que peuvent coexister de multiples modes de croyance. Il y a des hommes pour qui le Dieu est la Personne suprême, originaire. Il y a ceux qui se prosternent devant le Dieu, avec amour et dévotion. Il y a ceux qui L’adorent comme étant l’Unique, et d’autres qui L’adorent dans l’Immanence, dans Sa présence parmi la diversité infinie des êtres et des choses, et il y en a d’autres encore qui Le voient dans l’Universel.iii

 

Dans le Véda, le Dieu suprême est à la fois unique, absolu, transcendant, immanent, universel ; en un mot, Il est Tout en tout.

« Mais Moi, Je suis le rite et le sacrifice, l’oblation aux ancêtres, l’herbe et le mantra. Je suis le beurre, et le feu, et l’offrande. De cet univers, Je suis le père, la mère, le soutien et l’aïeul, Je suis l’objet du savoir, le purificateur et la syllabe OM. Je suis également le Rig, le Sâma et le Yajur. Je suis le but, le soutien, le maître, le témoin, la demeure, le refuge et l’ami le plus cher, Je suis la création et l’annihilation, la base de toutes choses, le lieu du repos et l’éternelle semence (…) Je suis l’immortalité, et la mort personnifiée. L’être et le non-être, tous deux sont en Moi, ô Arjuna. »iv

 

Dans sa 3ème conférence sur le Védantav donnée à Londres en 1894, Max Müller rappelle que l’Esprit Suprême, le bráhman, ( ब्रह्मन्, nom du genre neutre, avec l’accent tonique mis sur la racine verbale BRAH-, portée au degré plein – guṇa’) dit dans la Bhagavadgītā : « Même ceux qui adorent des idoles m’adorent ».

Et Müller ajoute que, dans le cadre de la philosophie védanta, ce principe suprême, le bráhman, qu’il faut distinguer du brahmán, nom d’agent de genre masculin signifiant le « Créateur », pourrait même affirmer : « Même ceux qui adorent un Dieu personnel sous l’image d’un ouvrier actif, ou d’un Roi des rois m’adorent ou, en tous cas, pensent à moi.»

Dans cette vue, le brahmán (le Créateur) ne serait, en réalité, qu’une manifestation du bráhman (le Principe Suprême). Mais le bráhman semble aussi dire ici, non sans une certaine ironie, que l’on pourrait parfaitement soutenir la position inverse,

 

encore, le judaïsme professa une intuition étrangement comparable, avec la célèbre entame du premier verset de la Genèse : Béréchit bara Elohim (Gn 1,1), que l’on peut traduire selon certains commentateurs du Béréchit Rabba : « ‘Au-principe’ créa les Dieux », (c’est-à-dire : ‘Bé-réchit’ créa les Elohim). D’autres commentateurs proposent même de comprendre : «Avec le Plus Précieux, *** créa les Dieux ». Je note ici à l’aide des trois astérisques l’ineffabilité du Nom du Principe Suprême (non nommé mais sous-entendu). En combinant ces interprétations : « Le Principe (sous-entendu) créa les Elohim ‘avec’ (la particule – peut avoir ce sens) le ‘Plus Précieux’ (l’un des sens possibles du mot réchit). »

 

Pour le comparatiste, ces possibilités (même ténues) de convergence entre des traditions a priori aussi différentes que la védique et l’hébraïque, sont sources de méditations sans fin, et d’inspiration tonique

 

Mais revenons au Véda et la philosophie des Védanta.

 

Le plus grand commentateur, peut-être, de l’héritage védique, Ādi Śaṅkara (आदि शङ्कर ) explique : « Quand bráhman n’est défini dans les Oupanishads que par des termes négatifs, en excluant toutes les différences de nom et de forme dues à la non-science, il s’agit du supérieur. Mais quand il est défini en des termes tels que : « l’intelligence dont le corps est esprit et lumière, qui se distingue par un nom et une forme spéciaux, uniquement en vue du culte » (Chand, III, 14, 2), il s’agit de l’autre, du brahmán inférieur.»vi

 

Mais s’il en est ainsi, commente Max Müller, le texte qui dit que bráhman n’a pas de second (Chand, VI, 2, 1) paraît être contredit : « Non, répond Śaṅkara, parce que tout cela n’est que l’illusion du nom et de la forme causée par la non-science. En réalité les deux brahmans ne sont qu’un seul et même Brahman, l’un concevable, l’autre inconcevable, l’un phénoménal, l’autre absolument réel.»vii

 

La distinction établie par Śaṅkara est claire. Mais dans les Oupanishads, la ligne de démarcation entre le bráhman (suprême) et le brahmán (créateur) n’est pas toujours aussi nettement tracée.

Quand Śaṅkara interprète les nombreux passages des Oupanishads qui décrivent le retour de l’âme humaine, après la mort, vers ‘Brahman’ (sans que l’accent tonique soit distingué), Sankara l’interprète toujours comme étant le brahmán inférieur.

Müller explique : « Cette âme, comme le dit fortement Śaṅkara, ‘devient Brahman en étant Brahman’viii, c’est-à-dire, en le connaissant, en sachant ce qu’il est et a toujours été. Écartez la non-science et la lumière éclate, et dans cette lumière, le moi humain et le moi divin brillent en leur éternelle unité. De ce point de vue de la plus haute réalité, il n’y a pas de différence entre le Brahman suprême et le moi individuel ou Ātman (Véd. Soutras, I, 4, p. 339). Le corps, avec toutes les conditions ou oupadhis auxquelles il est subordonné, peut continuer pendant un certain temps, même après que la lumière de la connaissance est apparue, mais la mort viendra et apportera la liberté immédiate et la béatitude absolue ; tandis que ceux qui, grâce à leurs bonnes œuvres, sont admis au paradis céleste, doivent attendre, là, jusqu’à ce qu’ils obtiennent l’illumination suprême, et sont alors seulement rendus à leur vraie nature, leur vraie liberté, c’est-à-dire leur véritable unité avec Brahman. »ix

 

Du véritable Brahman, les Oupanishads disent encore de Lui : «En vérité, ami, cet Être impérissable n’est ni grossier ni fin, ni court ni long, ni rouge (comme le feu) ni fluide (comme l’eau). Il est sans ombre, sans obscurité, sans air, sans éther, sans liens, sans yeux, sans oreilles, sans parole, sans esprit, sans lumière, sans souffle, sans bouche, sans mesure, il n’a ni dedans ni dehors ». Et cette série de négations, ou plutôt d’abstractions, continue jusqu’à ce que tous les pétales soient effeuillés, et qu’il ne reste plus que le calice, le pollen, l’inconcevable Brahman, le Soi du monde. «Il voit, mais n’est pas vu ; il entend, mais on ne l’entend pas ; il perçoit, mais n’est pas perçu ; bien plus, il n’y a dans le monde que Brahman seul qui voie, entende, perçoive, ou connaisse.»x

 

Puisqu’Il est le seul à ‘voir’, le terme métaphysique qui conviendrait le mieux à cet Être serait celui de « lumière ».

Mais cela ne veut pas dire que Brahman est, en soi, « lumière », mais seulement que la lumière tout entière, dans toutes ses manifestations, est en Brahman.

Cette lumière est notamment la Lumière consciente, qui est un autre nom de la connaissance. Müller évoque le Moundaka Oupanishad: « ‘C’est la lumière des lumières ; quand Il brille, le soleil ne brille pas, ni la lune ni les étoiles, ni les éclairs, encore moins le feu. Quand Brahman brille, tout brille avec lui : sa lumière éclaire le monde.’ La lumière consciente représente, le mieux possible, la connaissance de Brahman, et l’on sait que Thomas d’Aquin appelait aussi Dieu le soleil intelligent (Sol intelligibilis). Car, bien que tous les attributs purement humains soient retirés à Brahman, la connaissance, quoique ce soit une connaissance sans objets extérieurs, lui est laissée. »xi

 

La ‘lumière’ de la ‘connaissance’ ou de la ‘sagesse’, semble la seule métaphore anthropomorphe que presque toutes les religions osent appliquer à l’Être suprême comme étant la moins inadéquate.

Ce faisant, ces religions, comme la védique, l’hébraïque, la chrétienne, ou la bouddhiste, oublient souvent quelles sont les limites étroites de la connaissance ou de la sagesse humaines, même parvenues à leur plus haut degré de perfection, et combien ces métaphores sont en réalité indignes de la Divinité.

 

Il y a en effet en toute connaissance comme en toute sagesse humaine un élément essentiellement passif.

Cette ‘passivité’ est naturellement parfaitement incompatible avec la Divinité… Du moins, en principe…

On ne peut s’empêcher de noter dans plusieurs religions l’idée d’une forme de passivité (active) de la Divinité suprême, qui prend l’initiative de se retirer de l’être et du monde, par égard pour sa créature.

Plusieurs exemples valent d’être cités.

Le Créateur suprême, Prajāpati, प्रजापति, littéralement « Père et Seigneur des créatures », se sentit « vidé » juste après avoir créé tous les mondes et tous les êtres. Le Fils du Dieu unique, sentit son « vide » (kénose, du grec kénos, vide, s’opposant à pléos, plein) et son « abandon » par Dieu, juste avant sa mort. Le Dieu de la kabbale juive consent Lui aussi à sa « contraction » (tsimtsoum) pour laisser un peu d’être à sa création.

 

Dans cette analogie implicite, cachée, souterraine, entre la passivité de la sagesse humaine, et l’évidement divin, il y aurait peut-être matière pour le déploiement d’une forme d’ironie, tragique, sublime et écrasante.

Mais cette analogie et cette ironie, permettraient aussi, alors, à la ‘sagesse’ humaine, certes infime, mais pas complètement aveugle, de s’approcher à petits pas de l’un des aspects les plus profonds du mystère.

iBhagavadgītā 9,4-5

iiBhagavadgītā 9,11

iii« D’autres, qui cultivent le savoir, M’adorent soit comme l’existence unique, soit dans la diversité des êtres et des choses, soit dans Ma forme universelle. » Bhagavadgītā 9,15

ivBhagavadgītā 9,16-19

vF. Max Müller. Introduction à la philosophie Védanta. Trois conférences faites à l’Institut Royal en mars 1894. Trad. De l’anglais par Léon Sorg. Ed. Ernest Leroux, Paris 1899.

viF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3ème conférence, p.39

viiF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3ème conférence, p.39-40

viiiIl faudrait ici sans doute préciser, grâce aux accents toniques : « L’âme devient brahmán en étant bráhman. » Mais on pourrait écrire aussi, me semble-t-il, par analogie avec la ‘procession’ des personnes divines que la théologie chrétienne a formalisée : « L’esprit devient bráhman en étant brahmán. »

ixF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3ème conférence, p.41

xF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3ème conférence, p.44

xiF. Max Müller, op. cit. 3ème conférence, p.45