Who Invented Monotheism?


Akhenaten. Thebes

The fables that people tell each other, the myths they construct for themselves, the stories that clothe their memory, help them to build their supposed identity, and enable them to distinguish themselves from other peoples.

Through the magic of words, « barbarians », « idolaters », « savages » and « infidels » appear in the imaginations of some peoples.

But with the hindsight of history and anthropology, we sometimes find strange similarities, disturbing analogies, between peoples who are so diverse, so distant, separated from each other by a priori ostracisms.

Many peoples resemble each other in that they all believe that they only are « unique », « special ». They believe that they are the only people in the world who are who they are, who believe in what they believe, who think what they think.

We can apply this observation to the religious fact.

The « monotheistic » religion, for example, has not appeared in a single culture, a single people. If the primacy of monotheistic worship is often associated with the ancient religion of the Hebrews, it is because we often forget that another form of monotheism was invented in Egypt by Amenophis IV (Akhenaten), several centuries before Abraham. Moses himself, according to Freud, but also according to the recent conclusions of some of the best informed Egyptologists, would have been, in his first life, a defrocked priest of the God Aten, and would have taken advantage of the Exodus to claim the laws and symbols of what was to define Judaism.

The idea of monotheism, far from being reserved for the Nile valley or the foothills of the Sinai, appeared in other cultures, in Vedic India or in the Avesta of ancient Iran.

In Max Müller’s Essay on the History of Religion (1879), which devotes a chapter to the study of the Zend Avesta, but also in Martin Haug’s Essays on the Sacred Language, Scriptures and Religion of the Parsis (Bombay, 1862), one finds curious and striking similarities between certain avestic formulas and biblical formulas.

In the Zend Avesta, we read that Zarathustra asked Ahura Mazda to reveal his hidden names. The God accepted and gave him twenty of them.

The first of these names is Ahmi, « I am ».

The fourth is Asha-Vahista, « the best purity ».

The sixth means « I am Wisdom ».

The eighth translates into « I am Knowledge ».

The twelfth is Ahura, « the Living One ».

The twentieth is Mazdao, which means: « I am He who is ».

It is easy to see that these formulas are taken up as they are in different passages of the Bible. Is it pure chance, an unexpected meeting of great minds or a deliberate borrowing? The most notable equivalence of formulation is undoubtedly « I am He who is », taken up word for word in the text of Exodus (Ex. 3:14).

Max Müller concludes: « We find a perfect identity between certain articles of the Zoroastrian religion and some important doctrines of Mosaism and Christianity.”

It is also instructive to note the analogies between the conception of Genesis in the Bible and the ideas that prevailed among the Egyptians, Babylonians, Persians or Indians about « Creation ».

Thus, in the first verse of Genesis (« In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth »), the verb « to create » is translated from the Hebrew בָּרַא, which does not mean « to create » in the sense of « to draw out of nothing », but rather in the sense of « to cut, carve, sculpt, flatten, polish », from a pre-existing substance. Similarly, the Sanskrit verb tvaksh, which is used to describe the creation of the world in the Vedic context, means « to shape, to arrange », as does the Greek poiein, which will be used in the Septuagint version.

Some proper nouns, too, evoke borrowings across language barriers. The name Asmodeus, the evil spirit found in the biblical book of Tobit, was certainly borrowed from Persia. It comes from the parsi, Eshem-dev , which is the demon of lust, and which is itself borrowed from the demon Aeshma-daeva, mentioned several times in the Zend Avesta.

Another curious coincidence: Zoroaster was born in Arran (in avestic Airayana Vaêga, « Seed of the Aryan »), a place identified as Haran in Chaldea, the region of departure of the Hebrew people. Haran also became, much later, the capital of Sabaism (a Judeo-Christian current attested in the Koran).

In the 3rd century BC, the famous translation of the Bible into Greek (Septuagint) was carried out in Alexandria. In the same city, at the same time, the text of the Zend Avesta was also translated into Greek. This proves that at that time there was a lively intellectual exchange between Iran, Babylonia and Judeo-Hellenistic Egypt.

It seems obvious that several millennia earlier, a continuous stream of influences and exchanges already bathed peoples and cultures, circulating ideas, images and myths between India, Persia, Mesopotamia, Judea and Egypt.

And the very names of these countries, if they mean so much to us, it is probably because, by contrast, the cultures of earlier, « pre-historic » ages have left precisely little trace. But it is easy to imagine that the thinkers, prophets and magi of the Palaeolithic also had an intuition of the Whole and the One.

The « Book » and the « Word ».


The high antiquity of the Zend language, contemporary to the language of the Vedas, is well established. Eugène Burnoufi even considers that it presents certain characteristics of anteriority, which the vocal system testifies to. But this thesis remains controversial. Avestic science was still in its infancy in the 19th century. It was necessary to use conjectures. For example, Burnouf tried to explain the supposed meaning of the name Zarathustra, not without taking risks. According to him, zarath means « yellow » in zend, and uchtra, « camel ». The name of Zarathustra, the founder of Zoroastrianism, would thus mean: « He who has yellow camels »?

Burnouf, with all his young science, thus contradicts Aristotle who, in his Treatise on Magic, says that the word Ζωροάστρην (Zoroaster) means « who sacrifices to the stars ».

It seems that Aristotle was right. Indeed, the old Persian word Uchtra can be related to the Indo-European word ashtar, which gave « astre » in French and « star » in English. And zarath can mean « golden ». Zarathustra would then mean « golden star », which is perhaps more appropriate to the founder of a thriving religion.

These questions of names are not so essential. Whether he is the happy owner of yellow camels, or the incarnation of a star shining like gold, Zoroaster is above all the mythical author of the Zend Avesta, of which the Vendidad and the Yaçna are part.

The name Vendidad is a contraction of Vîdaêvo dâta, « given against demons (dêvas) ».

The Yaçna (« sacrifice with prayers ») is a collection of Avestic prayers.

Here is an extract, quite significant.

« As a worshipper of Mazda [Wisdom], a sectarian of Zoroaster, an enemy of the devils [demons], an observer of the precepts of Ahura [the « Lord »], I pay homage to him who is given here, given against the devils, and to Zoroaster, pure, master of purity, and to the yazna [sacrifice], and to the prayer that makes favorable, and to the blessing of the masters, and to the days, and the hours, and the months, and the seasons, and the years, and to the yazna, and to the prayer that makes favorable, and to the blessing!”

This prayer is addressed to the Lord, Ahura. But it is also addressed to the prayer itself.

In a repetitive, self-referential way, it is a prayer to the yaçna, a ‘prayer praying the prayer’, an invocation to the invocation, a blessing of the blessing. A homage from mediation to mediation.

This stylistic formula, « prayer to prayer », is interesting to analyze.

Let us note from the outset that the Zend Avesta clearly recognises the existence of a supreme God, to whom every prayer is addressed.

« I pray and invoke the great Ormuzd [= Ahura Mazda, the « Lord of Wisdom »], brilliant, radiant with light, very perfect, very excellent, very pure, very strong, very intelligent, who is purest, above all that which is holy, who thinks only of the good, who is a source of pleasure, who gives gifts, who is strong and active, who nourishes, who is sovereignly absorbed in excellence.”ii

But Avestic prayer can also be addressed not only to the supreme God, but also to the mediation that make it possible to reach Him, like the sacred Book itself: « I pray and invoke the Vendidad given to Zoroaster, holy, pure and great.”iii

The prayer is addressed to God and all his manifestations, of which the Book (the Vendidad) is a part.

« I invoke and celebrate you Fire, son of Ormuzd, with all the fires.

I invoke and celebrate the excellent, pure and perfect Word that the Vendidad gave to Zoroaster, the sublime, pure and ancient Law of the Mazdeans.”

It is important to note that it is the Sacred Book (the Vendidad) that gives the divine Word to Zoroaster, and not the other way round. The Zend Avesta sees this Book as sacred and divine, and recognizes it as an actor of divine revelation.

It is tempting to compare this divine status of the Book in the Zend Avesta with the divine status of the Torah in Judaism and the Koran in Islam.

The divine status of sacred texts (Zend Avesta, Torah, Koran) in these monotheisms incites to consider a link between the affirmation of the absolute transcendence of a supreme God and the need for mediation between the divine and the human, – a mediation which must itself be « divine ».

It is interesting to underline, by contrast, the human origin of evangelical testimonies in Christianity. The Gospels were written by men, Matthew, Mark, Luke, John. The Gospels are not divine emanations, but human testimonies. They are therefore not of the same essence as the Torah (« revealed » to Moses), or the Koran (« dictated » to Muhammad, who was otherwise illiterate) or the Zend Avesta (« given » to Zoroaster).

In Christianity, on the other hand, it is Christ himself who embodies divine mediation in his person. He, the Anointed One, Christ, the Messiah, incarnates the divine Word, the Verb.

Following this line of thought, one would have to conclude that Christianity is not a « religion of the Book », as the oversimplified formula that usually encompasses the three monotheisms under the same expression would suggest.

This formula certainly suits Judaism and Islam, as it does Zend Avesta. But Christianity is not a religion of the « Book », it is a religion of the « Word ».

iEugène Burnouf, Commentaire sur le Yaçna, l’un des livres religieux des Parses. Ouvrage contenant le texte zend. 1833

iiZend Avesta, I, 2

iiiZend Avesta, I, 2

Qui a inventé le monothéisme?


Les fables que les peuples se racontent, les mythes qu’ils se construisent, les récits dont ils habillent leur mémoire, les aident à bâtir leur identité supposée, et leur permettent de se distinguer des autres peuples.

Par la magie des mots, surgissent alors dans l’imaginaire de certains peuples, des « barbares », des « idolâtres », des « sauvages », ou des « incroyants ».

Mais avec le recul de l’histoire et de l’anthropologie, on trouve parfois d’étranges ressemblances, de troublantes analogies, entre des peuples si divers, si éloignés, séparés mutuellement par des ostracismes a priori.

Ainsi, bien des peuples se ressemblent en ceci qu’ils se croient « uniques », « spéciaux ». Ils se croient seuls au monde à être ce qu’ils sont, à croire en ce qu’ils croient, à penser ce qu’ils pensent.

On peut appliquer ce constat au fait religieux.

La religion « monothéiste », par exemple, n’est pas apparue dans une seule culture, un seul peuple. Si l’on associe souvent la primauté du culte monothéiste à l’ancienne religion des Hébreux, c’est parce qu’on oublie souvent qu’une autre forme de monothéisme avait été inventée en Égypte par Aménophis IV (Akhenaton), plusieurs siècles avant Abraham. Moïse lui-même, selon Freud, mais aussi d’après les conclusions récentes d’égyptologues parmi les mieux informés, aurait été, dans sa première vie, un prêtre défroqué du Dieu Aton, et aurait profité de l’Exode pour définir les lois et les symboles de ce qui devait définir le judaïsme.

L’idée du monothéisme, loin d’être réservée à la vallée du Nil ou aux contreforts du Sinaï, est apparue dans d’autres cultures encore, dans l’Inde védique, ou dans l’Avesta de l’ancien Iran.

Dans l’Essai sur l’histoire des religions (1879) de Max Müller, qui consacre un chapitre à l’étude du Zend Avesta, mais aussi dans les Essais sur la langue sacrée, sur les écritures et la religion des Parsis de Martin Haug (Bombay, 1862), on trouve de curieuses et frappantes ressemblances entre certaines formules avestiques et des formules bibliques.

Dans le Zend Avesta, on lit que Zarathustra pria Ahura Mazda de lui révéler ses noms cachés. Le Dieu accepta et lui en livra vingt.

Le premier de ces noms est Ahmi, « Je suis ».

Le quatrième est Asha-Vahista, « la meilleure pureté ».

Le sixième signifie « Je suis la Sagesse ».

Le huitième se traduit en « Je suis la Connaissance ».

Le douzième est Ahura, « le Vivant ».

Le vingtième est Mazdao, qui signifie : « Je suis celui qui suis».

Il est aisé de voir que ces formules sont reprises telles quelles dans différents passages de la Bible. Est-ce pur hasard, rencontre inopinée de grands esprits ou emprunt délibéré? La plus notable équivalence de formulation est sans doute « Je suis celui qui suis », reprise mot pour mot dans le texte de l’Exode (Ex. 3,14).

Max Müller conclut pour sa part: « Nous trouvons une parfaite identité entre certains articles de la religion zoroastrienne et quelques doctrines importantes du mosaïsme et du christianisme. »

 

Il est également instructif de remarquer les analogies entre la conception de la Genèse dans la Bible et les idées qui prévalaient chez les Égyptiens, les Babyloniens, les Perses ou les Indiens, à propos de la « Création ».

Ainsi, dans le premier verset de la Genèse (« Au commencement Dieu créa les cieux et la terre »), le verbe « créer » traduit l’hébreu בר, qui ne signifie pas « créer » au sens de « tirer du néant », mais plutôt au sens de « couper, tailler, sculpter, aplanir, polir », à partir d’une substance préexistante. De même, le verbe sanskrit tvaksh qui est utilisé pour décrire la création du monde dans le contexte védique, signifie « façonner, arranger », tout comme le grec poiein, qui sera utilisé dans la version de la Septante.

Certains noms propres, également, évoquent des emprunts par delà les barrières des langues. Le nom Asmodée, ce mauvais esprit que l’on trouve dans le livre biblique de Tobie, a certainement été emprunté à la Perse. Il vient du parsi, Eshem-dev , qui est le démon de la concupiscence, et qui est lui-même emprunté au démon Aeshma-daeva, plusieurs fois cité dans le Zend Avesta.

Autre curieuse coïncidence : Zoroastre est né dans Arran (en avestique Airayana Vaêga, « Semence de l’Aryen »), lieu identifié comme étant Haran en Chaldée, région de départ du peuple hébreu. Haran devint aussi, bien plus tard, la capitale du sabéisme (courant judéo-chrétien attesté dans le Coran).

Au 3ème siècle avant J.-C., on procéda à Alexandrie à la fameuse traduction de la Bible en grec (Septante). Dans cette même ville, au même moment, on traduisait également en grec le texte du Zend Avesta. Ceci prouve qu’alors des échanges intellectuels nourris existaient entre l’Iran, la Babylonie et l’Égypte judéo-hellénistique.

Il paraît évident que plusieurs millénaires auparavant, un courant continuel d’influences et d’échanges baignait déjà les peuples et les cultures, faisant circuler les idées, les images et les mythes entre l’Inde, la Perse, la Mésopotamie, la Judée, l’Égypte.

Et ces noms de pays mêmes, s’ils signifient autant pour nous, c’est sans doute parce que les cultures des âges antérieurs, « pré-historiques », n’ont précisément guère laissé de traces. Mais on peut sans trop de peine se représenter que les penseurs, les prophètes et les mages du Paléolithique, avaient eux aussi une intuition du Tout et de l’Un.