A God with no Name


The intuition of mystery has touched humanity from the earliest ages. Eight hundred thousand years ago, men carried out religious rites accompanying the death of their loved ones, in a cave near Beijing, at Chou Kou Tien. Skulls were found there, placed in a circle and painted in red ochre. They bear witness to the fact that almost a million years ago, men believed that death was a passage.

Fascination with other worlds, a sense of mystery, confrontation with the weakness of life and the rigor of death, seem to be part of the human genetic heritage, since the dawn of time, inhabiting the unconscious, sculpting cultures, knotting myths, informing languages.

The idea of the power of the divine is an extremely ancient idea, as old as humanity itself. It is equally obvious that the minds of men all over the world have, since extremely ancient times, turned towards forms of animism, religions of immanence or even religions of ecstasy and transcendent trance, long before being able to speculate and refine « theological » questions such as the formal opposition between « polytheism » and « monotheism ».

Brains and cultures, minds and languages, were not yet mature.

Animism, shamanism, polytheism, monotheism, and the religions of the immanence try to designate what cannot be said. In the high period, the time of human dawn, all these religions in -isms obviously came together in a single intuition, a single vision: the absolute weakness of man, the irremediable fleetingness of his life, and the infinite greatness and power of the unknown.

Feeling, guessing, fearing, worshipping, revering, this power was one and multiple. Innumerable names throughout the world have tried to express this power, without ever reaching its intrinsic unity.

This is why the assertion of the monotheisms that « God is One » is both a door that has been open for millions of years and at the same time, in a certain way, is also a saying that closes our understanding of the very nature of the « mystery », our understanding of how this « mystery » has taken root in the heart of the human soul, since Homo knew himself to be a sapiens

In the 17th century, Ralph Cudworth was already tackling the « great prejudice » that all primitive and ancient religions had been polytheistic, and that only « a small, insignificant handful of Jews »i had developed the idea of a single God.

A « small insignificant handful of Jews »? Compared to the Nations, number is not always the best indicator. Another way to put the question is: was the idea of the One God invented by the Jews? If so, when and why? If not, who invented it, and for how long was it there around the world?

If we analyse the available sources, it would seem that this idea appeared very early among the nations, perhaps even before the so-called « historical » times. But it must be recognized that the Jews brought the idea to its incandescence, and above all that they « published » it, and « democratized » it, making it the essential idea of their people. Elsewhere, and for millennia, the idea was present, but reserved in a way to an elite.

Greek polytheism, the Sibylline oracles, Zoroastrianism, the Chaldean religion, Orphism, all these « ancient » religions distinguished a radical difference between multiple born and mortal gods, and a Single God, not created and existing by Himself. The Orphic cabal had a great secret, a mystery reserved for the initiated, namely: « God is the Whole ».

Cudworth deduced from the testimonies of Clement of Alexandria, Plutarch, Iamblichus, Horapollo, or Damascius, that it was indisputably clear that Orpheus and all the other Greek pagans knew a single universal deity who was « the One », and « the Whole ». But this knowledge was secret, reserved for the initiated.

Clement of Alexandria wrote that « All the barbarian and Greek theologians had kept the principles of reality secret and had only transmitted the truth in the form of enigmas, symbols, allegories, metaphors and other tropes and similar figures. « ii And Clement made a comparison between the Egyptians and the Hebrews in this respect: « The Egyptians represented the truly secret Logos, which they kept deep in the sanctuary of truth, by what they called ‘Adyta’, and the Hebrews by the curtain in the Temple. As far as concealment is concerned, the secrets of the Hebrews and those of the Egyptians are very similar.”iii

Hieroglyphics (as sacred writing) and allegories (the meaning of symbols and images) were used to transmit the secret arcana of the Egyptian religion to those who were worthy of it, to the most qualified priests and to those chosen to succeed the king.

The « hieroglyphic science » was entirely responsible for expressing the mysteries of theology and religion in such a way that they remained hidden from the profane crowd. The highest of these mysteries was that of the revelation of « the One and Universal Divinity, the Creator of the whole world, » Cudworth added.

Plutarch noted several times in his famous work, On Isis and Osiris, that the Egyptians called their supreme God « the First God » and considered him a « dark and hidden God ».

Cudworth points out that Horapollo tells us that the Egyptians knew a Pantokrator (Universal Sovereign) and a Kosmokrator (Cosmic Sovereign), and that the Egyptian notion of ‘God’ referred to a « spirit that spreads throughout the world, and penetrates into all things to the deepest depths.

The « divine Iamblichus » made similar analyses in his De Mysteriis Aegyptiorum.

Finally, Damascius, in his Treatise on First Principles, wrote that the Egyptian philosophers said that there is a single principle of all things, which is revered under the name of ‘invisible darkness’. This « invisible darkness » is an allegory of this supreme deity, namely that it is inconceivable.

This supreme deity has the name « Ammon », which means « that which is hidden », as explained by Manetho of Sebennytos.

Cudworth, to whom we owe this compilation of quotations, deduced that « among the Egyptians, Ammon was not only the name of the supreme Deity, but also the name of the hidden, invisible and corporeal Deity ».

Cudworth concludes that long before Moses, himself of Egyptian culture, and brought up in the knowledge of ‘Egyptian wisdom’, the Egyptians were already worshipping a Supreme God, conceived as invisible, hidden, outside the world and independent of it.

The One (to Hen, in Greek) is the invisible origin of all things and he manifests himself, or rather « hides » himself in the Whole (to Pan, in Greek).

The same anthropological descent towards the mysterious depths of belief can be undertaken systematically, notably with the oldest texts we have, those of Zend Avesta, the Vedas and their commentaries on Upaniṣad.

« Beyond the senses is the mind, higher than the mind is the essence, above the essence is the great Self, higher than the great [Self] is the unmanifested.

But beyond the unmanifested is Man, the Puruṣa, passing through all and without sign in truth. By knowing Him, the human being is liberated and attains immortality.

His form does not exist to be seen, no one can see it through the eye. Through the heart, through the intelligence, through the mind He is apprehended – those who know Him become immortal. (…)

Not even by speech, not even by the mind can He be reached, not even by the eye. How can He be perceived other than by saying: « He is »?

And by saying « He is » (in Sanskrit asti), He can be perceived in two ways according to His true nature. And by saying « He is », for the one who perceives Him, His true nature is established.

When all the desires established in one’s heart are liberated, then the mortal becomes immortal, he reaches here the Brahman.”iv

The Zohar also affirms: « The Holy One blessed be He has a hidden aspect and a revealed aspect. »

Aren’t these not « two ways » of perceiving the true nature of « He is »? Rabbi Hayyim of Volozhyn affirms: « The essence of the En-Sof (Infinite) is hidden more than any secret; it must not be named by any name, not even the Tetragrammaton, not even the end of the smallest letter, the Yod.” v

So what do all these names of God mean in the purest monotheism?

« R. ‘Abba bar Mamel says: The Holy One blessed be He says to Moshe: Do you want to know my Name? I name Myself after my deeds. Sometimes my name is El Shadday, Tsebaoth, Elohim, YHVY. When I judge creatures my name is Elohim, when I fight the wicked I am called Tsebaoth, when I suspend the faults of men I am El Shadday and when I take pity on the worlds I am YHVH. This Name is the attribute of mercy, as it is said: « YHVY, YHVH, merciful and compassionate God » (Ex. 34:6). Likewise: ‘Ehyeh, asher ‘Ehyeh (I am who I am) (Ex. 3:14) – I name myself after my deeds.”vi

These are very wise words, which invite us to ask ourselves what was the name of YHVH, 800,000 years ago, at Chou Kou Tien, when He saw the sorrow of these men and women, a small group of Homo sapiens in affliction and grief, assembled at the bottom of a cave.

iRalph Cudworth, True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678), quoted in Jan Assmann, Moïse l’Égyptien, 2001, p.138

iiClement of Alexandria, Stromata V, ch. 4, 21,4

iiiClement of Alexandria, Stromata V, ch.3, 19,3 and Stromata V, ch.6, 41,2

ivKaha-upaniad 2.3. 7-9 and 12-14. Upaniad. My translation into English from the French Translation by Alyette Degrâces. Fayard. 2014. p. 390-391

vRabbi Hayyim de Volozhyn. L’âme de la vie. 2ème Portique, ch. 2. Trad. Benjamin Gross. Verdier. Lagrasse, 1986, p.74

viIbid. 2ème Portique, ch. 3, p. 75.

De l’éblouissement, dans la nuit des temps


L’idée d’un Dieu ‘Un’, au-dessus du ‘Tout’, est une idée extrêmement ancienne, qui a de tout temps accompagné, explicitement ou implicitement, les expressions variées de polythéismes divers.

Dès le 17ème siècle, des chercheurs comme Ralph Cudworth ont commencé de s’attaquer au « grand préjugé » qui voulait que toutes les religions primitives et antiques aient été ‘polythéistes’, et que seule « une petite poignée insignifiante de Juifs »i ait élaboré l’idée d’un Dieu unique.

Le polythéisme grec, les oracles sibyllins, le zoroastrisme, la religion chaldéenne, l’orphisme, toutes ces religions antiques distinguaient de multiples dieux nés et mortels, mais admettaient aussi et sans apparente contradiction, un Dieu unique, non créé, existant par lui-même et maître de tous les autres dieux et de l’Univers…

Le grand secret de la cabale orphique, révélé aux initiés à la fin de leur initiation, était l’enseignement de ce mystère ultime : « Dieu est le Tout ».

Cudworth déduit des témoignages de Clément d’Alexandrie, de Plutarque, de Jamblique, d’Horapollon, ou de Damascius, qu’il était « incontestablement clair qu’Orphée et tous les autres païens grecs connaissaient une divinité unique universelle qui était l’Unique, le Tout. »ii

On a la preuve, par les textes, que les initiés de ces religions adoraient cet Unique, ce Tout. Il fallait une certaine capacité de réflexion et d’abstraction, dont seule une certaine élite disposait. Le peuple semblait se contenter de la multiplicité des autres dieux. Effet du tribalisme? Du provincialisme? Politique délibérée des prêtrises intéressées au statu quo ante, favorisant l’illettrisme — avant la lettre?

Clément d’Alexandrie écrit: « Tous les théologiens barbares et grecs avaient tenu secrets les principes de la réalité et n’avaient transmis la vérité que sous forme d’énigmes, de symboles, d’allégories, de métaphores et d’autres tropes et figures analogues. »iii Il fait une comparaison à ce sujet entre Égyptiens et Hébreux : « Les Égyptiens représentaient le Logos véritablement secret, qu’ils conservaient au plus profond du sanctuaire de la vérité, par ce qu’ils appellent ‘Adyta’, et les Hébreux par le rideau dans le Temple. Pour ce qui est de la dissimulation, les secrets des Hébreux et ceux des Égyptiens se ressemblent beaucoup. »iv

Si l’on suit le témoignage de Clément d’Alexandrie, on en infère que les religions des Barbares, des Grecs, des Égyptiens, avaient donc deux visages, l’un public, exotérique et ‘polythéiste’, et l’autre secret, ésotérique et ‘monothéiste’.

Les hiéroglyphes, en tant qu’écriture sacrée, et les allégories étaient utilisés pour transmettre les arcanes les plus profondes de la religion égyptienne à ceux qui en étaient trouvés dignes par les prêtres du rang le plus élevé, et notamment à ceux qui étaient choisis pour gouverner le royaume.

La « science hiéroglyphique » était chargée d’exprimer les mystères de la religion, tout en les gardant dissimulés à l’intelligence de la foule profane. Le plus haut de ces mystères était celui de l’existence de « la Divinité Unique et universelle, du Créateur du monde entier »v.

Plutarque note à plusieurs reprises dans son célèbre ouvrage, Sur Isis et Osiris, que les Égyptiens appelaient leur Dieu suprême « le Premier Dieu » et qu’ils le considéraient comme un « Dieu sombre et caché ».

Cudworth cite Horapollon qui affirme: « Les Égyptiens connaissaient un Pantokrator (Souverain universel) et un Kosmokrator (Souverain cosmique)», et ajoute que la notion égyptienne de Dieu désignait un « esprit qui se diffuse à travers le monde, et pénètre en toutes choses jusqu’au plus profond »vi.

Jamblique procède à des analyses similaires dans son De Mysteriis Aegyptiorum.

Enfin, Damascius, dans son Traité des premiers principes, écrit: « Les philosophes égyptiens disaient qu’il existe un principe unique de toutes choses, qui est révéré sous le nom de « ténèbres invisibles ». Ces « ténèbres invisibles » sont une allégorie de cette divinité suprême, à savoir du fait qu’elle est inconcevable. »vii

Cette divinité suprême a pour nom « Ammon », ce qui signifie « ce qui est caché », ainsi que l’a expliqué Manéthon de Sébennytos.

Cudworth, après avoir compilé et cité nombre d’auteurs anciens, en déduit que « chez les Égyptiens, Ammon n’était pas seulement le nom de la Divinité suprême, mais aussi le nom de la Divinité cachée, invisible et incorporelle ».viii

Il conclut que, bien avant Moïse, lui-même de culture égyptienne, élevé dans la ‘sagesse égyptienne’, les Égyptiens adoraient déjà un Dieu Suprême, conçu comme invisible, caché, extérieur au monde et indépendant de lui.

La sagesse égyptienne précédait donc de très loin la sagesse grecque dans la connaissance que l’Un (to Hen, en grec) est l’origine invisible de toutes choses et qu’il se manifeste, ou plutôt « se dissimule », dans le Tout (to Pan, en grec).

L’existence de cette ancienne sagesse égyptienne, qui avait commencé d’être codifiée dans le Livre des morts, mais qui remonte certainement aux périodes pré-dynastiques, n’enlève rien évidemment à l’originalité, à la puissance et au génie spécifique de la célébration hébraïque de l’Un. Mais elle montre surtout, et de manière éclatante, quoique par induction, que le mystère a toujours été présent dans l’âme des hommes, et cela sans doute depuis leur apparition sur terre.

Cette thèse peut sembler excessive. Je la crois éminemment vraisemblable. En tout cas, elle incite à continuer le travail de recherche anthropologique vers les profondeurs originaires, et le travail de réflexion philosophique sur la nature même des croyances de l’humanité, afin de scruter les origines mêmes du ‘phénomène humain’, pour reprendre l’expression de Pierre Teilhard de Chardin.

Les plus anciens textes dont nous disposions, comme le Zend Avesta et surtout les Védas, sont de précieuses sources pour aider à remonter vers ces origines. Ces textes précèdent les textes bibliques de plus d’un millénaire, mais ils montrent déjà que l’intuition de l’Un subsume la célébration des multiples ‘noms’ du Divin.

Il serait aisé, avec la distance des temps et des mentalités, de ne voir qu’ ‘idolâtrie’ dans le culte des statues de pierre ou de bois. Mais une autre attitude paraît bien plus prometteuse. Il s’agit d’y voir un point de départ et une invitation à remonter par degrés jusqu’aux origines les plus reculées du sentiment du sacré dans l’âme humaine, pour tenter d’en comprendre les fondements. Il y a un million d’années, sans doute, le sentiment du mystère habitait le tréfonds de l’âme de ces hommes, presque seuls au monde, qui parcouraient par petits groupes les savanes immenses et giboyeuses, traversaient des forêts sombres et touffues, franchissaient des gouffres et gravissaient des montagnes escarpées, aux sommets sublimes.

Ces hommes baignaient tout le jour et toutes les nuits dans le mystère de leur propre conscience.

Ils voyaient sans cesse au-dessus d’eux le voile d’un ciel sans fin et ils sentaient la lumière chaude et lointaine des astres, — sauf lorsqu’ils s’enfonçaient dans les ténèbres de grottes pleines d’abîmes, pour célébrer la révélation de leurs éblouissements.

iRalph Cudworth, True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678), cité in Jan Assmann, Moïse l’Égyptien, 2001, p.138

iiIbid.

iiiClément d’Alexandrie, Stromata V, ch. 4, 21,4

ivClément d’Alexandrie, Stromata V, ch.3, 19,3 et Stromata V, ch.6, 41,2

vJan Assmann, Moïse l’Égyptien, 2001

viRalph Cudworth, True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678)

viiCité in Ralph Cudworth, True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678)

viiiIbid.

Le monothéisme a été inventé bien avant Abraham et Moïse


Plus les recherches anthropologiques sur les origines des religions avancent, plus il devient évident que le monothéisme est une idée extrêmement ancienne, et qu’elle est peut-être même aussi vieille que l’humanité.

Au 17ème siècle, des chercheurs comme Ralph Cudworth s’attaquaient déjà au « grand préjugé » qui voulait que toutes les religions primitives et antiques aient été polythéistes, et que seule « une petite poignée insignifiante de Juifs »i ait élaboré l’idée d’un Dieu Unique.

Le polythéisme grec, les oracles sibyllins, le zoroastrisme, la religion chaldéenne, l’orphisme, toutes ces religions « antiques » distinguaient une radicale différence entre de multiples dieux nés et mortels, et un Dieu Unique, non créé et existant par lui-même. La cabale orphique avait un grand secret, un mystère réservé aux initiés, à savoir : « Dieu est le Tout ». Cudworth déduit des témoignages de Clément d’Alexandrie, de Plutarque, de Jamblique, d’Horapollon, ou de Damascius, qu’il était « incontestablement clair qu’Orphée et tous les autres païens grecs connaissaient une divinité unique universelle qui était l’Unique, le Tout. »

Mais ce savoir était secret, réservé aux initiés.

Clément d’Alexandrie écrit que « tous les théologiens barbares et grecs avaient tenu secrets les principes de la réalité et n’avaient transmis la vérité que sous forme d’énigmes, de symboles, d’allégories, de métaphores et d’autres tropes et figures analogues. »ii Et Clément fait d’ailleurs une comparaison à ce sujet entre Égyptiens et Hébreux : « Les Égyptiens représentaient le Logos véritablement secret, qu’ils conservaient au plus profond du sanctuaire de la vérité, par ce qu’ils appellent « Adyta », et les Hébreux par le rideau dans le Temple. Pour ce qui est de la dissimulation, les secrets des Hébreux et ceux des Égyptiens se ressemblent beaucoup. »iii

Les hiéroglyphes (en tant qu’écriture sacrée) et les allégories (le sens des symboles et des images) étaient utilisés pour transmettre les arcanes secrètes de la religion égyptienne à ceux qui s’en trouvaient dignes, aux prêtres les plus qualifiés et à ceux qui étaient choisis pour succéder au roi.

La « science hiéroglyphique » était tout entière chargée d’exprimer les mystères de la théologie et de la religion de façon qu’ils restent dissimulés à la foule profane. Le plus haut de ces mystères était celui de la révélation de « la Divinité Unique et universelle, du Créateur du monde entier », ajoutait Cudworth.

Il rappelle que Plutarque note à plusieurs reprises dans son célèbre ouvrage, Sur Isis et Osiris, que les Égyptiens appelaient leur Dieu suprême « le Premier Dieu » et qu’ils le considéraient comme un « Dieu sombre et caché ».

Cudworth signale aussi que Horapollon « nous dit que les Égyptiens connaissaient un Pantokrator (Souverain universel) et un Kosmokrator (Souverain cosmique)», et que la notion égyptienne de « Dieu » désignait un « esprit qui se diffuse à travers le monde, et pénètre en toutes choses jusqu’au plus profond ».

Le « divin Jamblique » procède à des analyses similaires dans son De Mysteriis Aegyptiorum.

Enfin, Damascius, dans son Traité des premiers principes, écrit que « les philosophes égyptiens disaient qu’il existe un principe unique de toutes choses, qui est révéré sous le nom de « ténèbres invisibles ». Ces « ténèbres invisibles » sont une allégorie de cette divinité suprême, à savoir du fait qu’elle est inconcevable. »

Cette divinité suprême a pour nom « Ammon », ce qui signifie « ce qui est caché », comme l’a expliqué Manéthon de Sébennytos.

Cudworth, à qui on doit cette compilation de citations, en déduit que « chez les Égyptiens, Ammon n’était pas seulement le nom de la Divinité suprême, mais aussi le nom de la Divinité cachée, invisible et acorporelle ».

Cudworth conclut que bien avant Moïse, lui-même de culture égyptienne, et élevé dans la connaissance de la ‘sagesse égyptienne’, les Égyptiens adoraient déjà un Dieu Suprême, conçu comme invisible, caché, extérieur au monde et indépendant de lui.

L’Un (to Hen, en grec) est l’origine invisible de toutes choses et il se manifeste, ou plutôt « se dissimule » dans le Tout (to Pan, en grec).

Le même travail de remontée anthropologique vers les profondeurs mystérieuses de la croyance devrait être entrepris de façon systématique, notamment avec les plus anciens textes dont nous disposions, ceux du Zend Avesta et surtout les Védas.

iRalph Cudworth, True Intellectual System of the Universe (1678), cité in Jan Assmann, Moïse l’Égyptien, 2001, p.138

iiClément d’Alexandrie, Stromata V, ch. 4, 21,4

iiiClément d’Alexandrie, Stromata V, ch.3, 19,3 et Stromata V, ch.6, 41,2