Counting the Visions of Haggar


Haggar, Sara’s servant, conceived – at Sara’s request – a son with Abraham. Haggar was then expelled into the desert by Sara who resented bitterness from her triumphant pregnancy.
The name « Haggar » means « emigration ». Pregnant and on the run, she met an angel near a well in the desert. It was not her first encounter with an angel.
According to Rashi, Haggar had already seen angels four times in Abraham’s dwelling. He also points out that « she had never had the slightest fear of them », because « she was used to seeing them ».
Haggar’s meeting with the angel near the well gave rise to a curious scene. There was a mysterious encounter between Haggar and the Lord, implying at least two successive, different, « visions ».
She proclaimed the name of the Lord [YHVH] who had spoken to her: ‘You are the God [EL] of my vision [Roÿ], because, she said, did I not see, right here, after I saw?’ That is why the well was called ‘Beer-la-Haÿ-Roÿ[the ‘Well of the Living One of My Vision’]; it is located between Kadesh and Bered.”i
It is said that Haggar « proclaimed the name of the Lord [YHVH]« , but in fact she did not pronounce this very name, YHVH, which is, as we know, unpronounceable. She used instead a new metaphor that she had just coined: « El Roÿ » (literally ‘God of my Vision’).
She thus gave a (pronouncable) name to the (unspeakable) vision she just had.
From the name given to the well, that was conserved by the tradition, we infer that, a little while after having ‘called the Lord’, Haggar called the Lord a second time with yet another name: « Haÿ Roÿ » (‘The Living One of My Vision’). It is this second name that she used to name the well.
Haggar coined two different names, just as she had two successive visions.
In the text of Genesis, Haggar used the word « vision » twice and the expression « I saw » also twice.
She revealed that she had another vision ‘after she saw’: « Didn’t I see, right here, after I saw? ».
The first name she gave to the Lord is very original. She is the only person in the whole Bible who uses this name: « El Roÿ » (‘God of My Vision’).
The second name is even more original: « Haÿ Roÿ » (‘the Living One of My Vision’).
Here is a servant girl expelled away in the desert by her mistress. She then has two visions, and she invents two new names for God!
The name she gives to the second vision is « The Living One ». This vision is indeed very alive, it is « living », it does not disappear like a dream, it lives deeply in her soul, as the child moves in her womb.
The text, taken literally, indicates that Haggar had two successive visions. But Rashi takes the analysis further, in his commentary on Gen 16, 9:
« THE ANGEL OF THE LORD SAID TO HIM. For every saying, another angel had been sent to her. This is why for each saying, the word AN ANGEL OF THE LORD [ מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה ] is repeated.»
Then according to Rashi, fourangels of the Lord’ spoke with Haggar, who therefore had four visions corresponding to four different angels.

If we add the four other visions that she already had in Abraham’s dwelling, also according to Rashi, Haggar had at least eight visions in her life.

I say ‘at least’, because around twenty years later, Haggar had yet another spiritual encounter: an angel called her from the heaven, when she was in danger of dying after having been expelled, once more, from Abraham’s dwelling, as reported in Gen 21,17.
The last angel who spoke to Haggar, near the Well of the Living One of My Vision’, had said :
« You shall bear a son, you shall call him Ishmael, because God has heard your affliction. »ii
Ishmael can indeed be translated as « God has heard ».
Haggar saw a vision and heard a divine voice, and God also « heard » Haggar. But why doesn’t the text say that God « saw » her affliction?
Here is a possible interpretation: in fact God does « hear » and « see » Haggar, but He does not “see” her separately from her unborn son. He « sees » the mother together with her son, the former pregnant with the latter, and He « sees » no immediate reason for affliction. Rather, God « sees » in her the vigorous thrust of a life yet to come, growing in her womb as a seed, and her future joy.
Haggar’s affliction has nothing to do with her pregnancy, it has everything to do with the humiliation imposed on her by Sara. It is this humiliation that God « heard ».
But then, why did the angel who spoke the second time say to her: « Go back to your mistress and humiliate yourself under her hand.” ?
Why does God, who « heard » Haggar’s affliction and humiliation, ask her to return to Abraham’s dwelling, for a further life of humiliation?
God reserves great glory for the afflicted, the humble, the humiliated. And as a price for a life of humiliation, Haggar « saw » the Most High, the Almighty, at least eight times. Many more times than Sara, it seems.

iGn 16, 13-14

ii Gen. 16, 11

The Hidden God


In Judaism, the idea that God is ‘hidden’ is deeply embedded. God transcends all conception. The Holy of Holies is empty.

The prophets repeat:

« Truly You are a God who hides Himself, O God of Israel, the Savior. » (Is. 45,15)

« Why do You hide Your Face?  » (Ps. 44,24)

But in reality, this notion of a ‘hidden God’ was not specific to Judaism. The ancient Egyptian civilization had had, long before Judaism, a similar conception of a ‘hidden’ Supreme God.

Ra hides Himself in His own appearance. The solar disk is not the God Ra, and it does not even represent the God. The solar disk is only the mysterious veil that hides the God.

This is also true of the other Gods of the Egyptian pantheon, who are in reality only multiple appearances of the one God. « The outer forms which the Egyptians gave to the divinity were only conventional veils, behind which were hidden the splendors of the one God. « , analyses F. Chabas, in his presentation of the Harris Magical Papyrus (1860).

In the language of hieroglyphics, the word « hidden » (occultatus) is rendered by the term ammon . This word derives from amen, « to hide ». In the Harris Papyrus an address to the God Ammon-Râ sums up the mystery: « You are hidden in the great Ammon ».

Ra is ‘hidden’ in Ammon (the ‘hidden’), he is ‘hidden’ in the mystery of his (shining) appearance.

Ra is not the sun, nor is he the Sun-God, as it has been often misinterpreted. The solar disk is only a symbol, a sign. The God hides behind it, behind this abstraction, this pure « disc ».

By reading the prayer of adoration of Ammon-fa-Harmachis (Harris Papyrus IV 1-5), one grows convinced of the abstract, grandiose and transcendent conception that Egyptians had of the God Ammon-Râ.

This elevated conception is very far from the supposed ‘idolatry’ that was later attached to their ancient faith. The Papyrus Harris gives a vivid description of the essence of the Ancient Egyptian faith, flourishing in Upper Egypt, more than two millennia before Abraham’s departure from the city of Ur in Chaldea.

Here are the invocations of a prayer of adoration:

« Hail to you, the One who has been formed.

Vast is His width, it has no limits.

Divine leader with the ability to give birth to Himself.

Uraeus! Great flaming ones!

Supreme virtuous, mysterious of forms.

Mysterious soul, which has made His terrible power.

King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Ammon Ra, Healthy and strong life, created by Himself.

Double horizon, Oriental Hawk, brilliant, illuminating, radiant.

Spirit, more spirit than the gods.

You are hidden in the great Ammon.

You roll around in your transformations into a solar disk.

God Tot-nen, larger than the gods, rejuvenated old man, traveler of the centuries.

Ammon – permanent in all things.

This God began the worlds with His plans. »

The name Uraeus, which is found in this text as an epithet of the God Ra, is a Latinized transposition of the Egyptian original Aarar, which designates the sacred aspic, the royal serpent Uraeus, and whose second meaning is « flames ».

These invocations testify to a very high conception of the divine mystery, more than two thousand years before Abraham. It is important to stress this point, because it leads us to the conclusion that the mysterious, hidden, secret, God is a kind of ‘universal’ paradigm.

Since the depths of time, men of all origins have spent millennia meditating on the mystery, confronting the hidden permanence of the secret divinity, inventing metaphors to evoke an unspeakable, ineffable God.

These initial intuitions, these primeval faiths, may have prepared the later efflorescence of the so-called « monotheism », in its strict sense.

But it is worth trying to go back, ever further, to the origins. The prayers of ancient times, where did they come from? Who designed them? Who was the first to cry:

« Ammon hiding in His place!

Soul that shines in His eye, His holy transformations are not known.

Brilliant are His shapes. His radiance is a veil of light.

Mystery of mysteries! His mystery is not known.

Hail to You, in Goddess Nout!

You really gave birth to the gods.

The breaths of truth are in Your mysterious sanctuary.»

What strikes in these short prayers is their « biblical » simplicity. Humble, simple words to confront with high and deep mysteries…

Premonitions, images, burst forth. The « brightness » of God is only « a veil of light ». This image, of course, leads us to evoke other mystic visions, that of the burning bush by Moses, for example, or that of the shamans, all over the world, since Paleolithic…

Moses, raised at the court of the Pharaohs, may well have borrowed one metaphor or two from the Egyptian culture. No one can claim having a monopoly of access to the mystery. Many years before the time of Moses, and according to the Book of Genesis, Agar, an Egyptian woman, met four times with either God or His Angels, – said Rachi, the great Jewish commentator. Sara, Abraham’s wife and Isaac’s mother, was not endowed with such a feat…

What really matters is that from age to age, exceptional men and women have seen ‘visions’, and that these ‘visions’ have transformed in a deep way their lives and the lives of those who followed them.

For thousands of years, humanity has accumulated a rich intuition of what is hidden beyond all appearances, it has perceived the probable existence of incredible depths beyond the shallowness of reality. Some men and women have at times been able to lift a corner of the veil, and to see, as if through a dream, the unbearable brilliance of an ineffable light.

It is necessary to consider the essence of what was ‘seen’ by these chosen pioneers, the depths of their experience, in the interest of Humankind as a whole. Their collective knowledge constitutes a general, universal, massive, plurimillennial, anthropological fact, anchored (then and now) in a number of living human souls, at the very bottom of the cortex.

But these fundamental experiences have not really succeeded in connecting all men of faith around the Earth. Why? Why, today, such a spectacle of religious hatred, the continuing desolation of endless violence, the proliferation of despair?

How long still will the God stay ‘hidden’?

La Genèse des rires et des pleurs.


Quatre personnages de la Genèse rient : Abraham, Sara, Ismaël, Isaac. Mais Agar pleure.

Qu’est-ce que cela nous enseigne ?

« Abraham tomba sur sa face et rit. » Gen. 17,17

«Sara rit en elle-même.» Gen. 18,12

« Sara dit : ‘Je n’ai pas ri.’, car elle avait peur, mais il répliqua : ‘si, tu as ri’. » Gen. 18,15

« Quiconque l’apprendra rira avec moi. » Gen. 21,6

« Dieu a fait (un) rire de moi.»i Gen 21,6.

« Le fils, né à Abraham de l’Égyptienne Agar, riait. » Gen. 21,9

« Isaac riait avec Rebecca sa femme. »ii Gen. 26,9.

Ces différents rires n’ont pas la même signification. Abraham rit en confiance et reconnaissance, Sara a un rire moqueur et dubitatif, Ismaël est ricanant et railleur, et Isaac a un rire concupiscent et jouisseur.

Et puis, il y a les larmes d’Agar.

« Elle se disait : ‘Je ne veux pas voir mourir l’enfant’. Elle s’assit vis-à-vis et se mit à crier et à pleurer. » Gen. 21,16.

Comment interpréter ces rires et ces pleurs ?

A l’évidence, le malheur d’Agar fait le bonheur de Sara. Mais cette explication est à demi valable, et même seulement pour un quart. Le malheur de Agar ne fait pas le bonheur d’Abraham, qui se chagrine des mauvaises paroles de Sara contre Agar (Gen. 21, 12). Il ne fait pas non plus le bonheur d’Ismaël, qui subit le même sort que sa mère, chassé au désert, du fait de son propre rire, railleur. Enfin le malheur de Agar n’a vraiment rien à voir avec les rires égrillards d’Isaac lutinant Rebecca.

Le texte de la Genèse montre une grande diversité de rires, avec des degrés fort différents, allant de la méchanceté ou l’ironie à la joie pure. On y trouve des rires vulgaires et méchants et des rires lumineux.

Quant aux larmes, elles sont sincères. Ce ne sont pas des larmes méchantes, vulgaires ou ironiques. Il y a plus de vérité dans le malheur que dans l’apparence du bonheur. Agar est malheureuse, profondément malheureuse.

Dans son malheur, elle a quand même un bonheur, celui de voir, une fois encore, un ange venu la consoler.

Elle pleure, car elle voit le monde tel qu’il est.

Elle pleure, mais en compensation « Dieu dessilla ses yeux. »iii

  • i L’original hébreu n’emploie pas d’article indéterminé devant le substantif ‘rire’, et par conséquent cette phrase se prête à deux interprétations : – « Dieu a fait de moi (Sara) un objet de dérision (on rira de moi) », ou encore : « Dieu m’a donné un sujet de joie (m’a fait rire) ». Ces deux interprétations vont dans des sens opposés. Mais compte tenu du caractère de Sara, déjà esquissé en Gen. 18,15, il est probable que la première interprétation est la meilleure. Mais qui sait ?

iiDans ce verset, il y a là un jeu de mot intraduisible. Isaac signifie : « Il rit ». Ce nom est bâti sur la racine TS-HA-Q, dont le sens est « rire ». Au prétérit, la forme verbale devient M-TS-HA-Q qui signifie dans ce contexte « rire avec sa femme », « se réjouir avec elle », et en tant que substantif : « caresse conjugale ». Yts’aq mts’éq : « Isaac (Celui qui rit) rit, se réjouit (sexuellement). »

iii Gen. 21, 19

Agar a vu Dieu sept fois, et même plus encore


Agar, servante de Sara, conçoit – à la demande de cette dernière – un fils avec Abraham. Agar est ensuite chassée au désert par Sara qui tire aigreur de sa grossesse.

Le nom « Agar » veut dire « émigration ».

Enceinte et en fuite, elle rencontre un ange près d’un puits dans le désert.

Ce n’est pas la première fois qu’elle voit un ange.

Selon Rachi, Agar a vu des anges à quatre reprises dans la maison d’Abraham. Il précise « qu’elle n’en a jamais eu la moindre frayeur », car « elle était accoutumée à les voir ».

La rencontre d’Agar avec l’ange près du puits donne lieu à une scène curieuse. On assiste à un mystérieux échange verbal à propos d’au moins deux « visions ».

« Elle proclama le nom de l’Éternel [YHVH] qui lui avait parlé : « Tu es le Dieu [EL] de la vision car, dit-elle, n’ai-je pas vu, ici même, après que j’ai vu ? » C’est pourquoi on appela ce puits : « le puits du Vivant de ma vision » ; il se trouve entre Cadès et Béred. »i

Agar « proclame le nom de l’Éternel », non pas en prononçant ce nom même, qui est d’ailleurs imprononçable [YHVH], mais à l’aide d’une métaphore : « El Roÿ » (Dieu de la Vision).

Elle donne un nom (dicible) à la vision (indicible) qu’elle vient d’avoir.

Un peu plus tard, Agar appelle l’Éternel une seconde fois avec un autre nom encore: «Haÿ Roÿ » (Le Vivant de la Vision). C’est de ce deuxième nom qu’elle se sert pour nommer le puits.

Agar donne deux noms différents, de même qu’elle a eu deux visions successives.

Elle emploie en effet deux fois le mot « vision » et deux fois l’expression « j’ai vu ».

Elle dit avoir eu une vision après avoir eu la première (« N’ai-je pas vu, ici même, après que j’ai vu ? »).

Le premier nom qu’elle donne à l’Éternel est fort original. Elle est la seule personne, dans toute la Bible, à lui donner ce nom : « El Roÿ ».

Le second nom est tout aussi original : « Haÿ Roÿ ».

Voilà une servante chassée dans le désert par sa maîtresse. Elle a deux visions, et elle invente deux noms inédits de Dieu !

Le nom qu’elle donne à la seconde vision est « Le Vivant ». La vision est « vivante », elle ne disparaît pas comme un songe, elle vit dans son âme, comme l’enfant s’agite dans son sein.

Le texte, pris littéralement, indique que Agar a bien eu deux visions successives. Mais ce n’est pas si simple.

Rachi pousse plus loin l’analyse, dans son commentaire du verset 9 :

« L’ANGE DU SEIGNEUR LUI DIT. Pour chaque parole, c’était un autre ange qui lui avait été envoyé. C’est pourquoi pour chaque parole on répète le mot UN ANGE. »

Selon le texte de la genèse, l’ange prend la parole à quatre reprises.

Si l’on suit l’interprétation de Rachi, Agar a donc eu quatre visions correspondant à quatre anges différents.

Mais alors, si on ajoute les autres visions déjà vues dans la maison d’Abraham, également mentionnées par Rachi, Agar a eu au cours de sa vie au moins sept visions.

Alors ? Deux, quatre ou sept visions? Ou plus encore ? En tout cas, plusieurs.

L’ange qui parle la quatrième fois (ou le quatrième ange, selon Rachi) dit à Sara:

« Tu mettras au monde un fils, tu le nommeras Ismaël, parce que Dieu a entendu ton affliction. »ii

Ismaël peut en effet se traduire par « Dieu a entendu ».

Agar a vu une vision et a entendu une voix divine. Dieu, lui aussi, a « entendu » Agar.

Mais pourquoi le texte ne dit-il pas que Dieu a « vu » son affliction ?

Je propose l’interprétation suivante : Dieu « entend » et « voit » Agar, mais il ne la « voit » pas séparément de son fils à naître. « Voyant » ainsi la mère et le fils, l’une enceinte de l’autre, il n’y « voit » pas de raison d’affliction. Il « voit » plutôt en elle la vigoureuse poussée de vie à l’œuvre en son sein, et sa joie en germe.

L’affliction de Agar n’a en effet rien à voir avec sa grossesse, elle a tout à voir avec l’humiliation que lui impose Sara. C’est cette humiliation que Dieu a « entendue ».

Mais alors, pourquoi l’ange qui prend la parole la deuxième fois lui dit-il : « Retourne chez ta maîtresse et humilie-toi sous sa main. »iii ?

Pourquoi Dieu, qui a « entendu » l’affliction et l’humiliation de Agar, lui demande-t-il de retourner chez Abraham, et de s’humilier davantage encore ?

Dieu réserve aux affligés, aux humbles, aux humiliés, une grande gloire.

Agar a « vu » le Très-Haut, le Tout-Puissant, deux, quatre, sept fois. Ou même plus encore.

i Gen. 16, 13-14. J’ai traduit ces versets mot à mot, en m’aidant de plusieurs versions disponibles. La version de la Bible de Jérusalem, aux Éditions du Cerf, est presque inutilisable car elle se contente de reproduire pour le nom de Dieu une transcription de l’hébreu, et suggère de plus en note que le texte est sans doute « corrompu ». La traduction du Rabbinat français est meilleure mais elle ajoute des mots qui ne sont pas littéralement dans le texte original. Elle traduit la fin du verset 13 ainsi : « Tu es le Dieu de la vision car, dit-elle, n’ai-je pas revu, ici même, la trace du Dieu après que je l’ai vu ? ». Pour ma part je n’ai pas trouvé trace du mot « trace » dans le texte hébreu.]

ii Gen. 16, 11

iiiGen. 16,9

Les uns rient, les autres pleurent.


 

Quatre personnages de la Genèse rient : Abraham, Sara, Ismaël, Isaac. Mais Agar pleure.

Qu’est-ce que cela nous enseigne ?

« Abraham tomba sur sa face et rit. » Gen. 17,17

«Sara rit en elle-même.» Gen. 18,12

« Sara dit : ‘Je n’ai pas ri.’, car elle avait peur, mais il répliqua : ‘si, tu as ri’. » Gen. 18,15

« Quiconque l’apprendra rira avec moi. » Gen. 21,6

« Dieu a fait (un) rire de moi.»i Gen 21,6.

« Le fils, né à Abraham de l’Égyptienne Agar, riait. » Gen. 21,9

« Isaac riait avec Rebecca sa femme. »ii Gen. 26,9.

Ces différentes sortes de rires n’ont pas la même signification. Celui d’Abraham est un rire de confiance et de reconnaissance, celui de Sara est un rire moqueur et dubitatif, celui d’Ismaël est ricanant et railleur, et celui d’Isaac est concupiscent et jouisseur.

Et puis, il y a les larmes de Agar.

« Elle se disait : ‘Je ne veux pas voir mourir l’enfant’. Elle s’assit vis-à-vis et se mit à crier et à pleurer. » Gen. 21,16.

Comment interpréter cela ?

D’abord on peut dire que le malheur des uns fait le bonheur des autres. Le malheur de Agar fait le bonheur de Sara. Mais cette explication est à demi valable, et même seulement valable pour un quart. Le malheur de Agar ne fait pas le bonheur d’Abraham, qui se chagrine des mauvaises paroles de Sara contre Agar (Gen. 21, 12). Il ne fait pas non plus le bonheur d’Ismaël, qui subit le même sort que sa mère et qui est chassé au désert, du fait de son propre rire, railleur et moqueur. Enfin le malheur de Agar n’a vraiment rien à voir avec les rires égrillards d’Isaac lutinant Rebecca.

Alors que comprendre ?

Le texte montre qu’il peut y avoir une grande diversité de rires, de joies, avec des degrés fort différents, allant de la méchanceté à l’ironie ou à la joie pure. Il y a des rires vulgaires et méchants et il y a des rires lumineux.

En revanche, les larmes, en un sens, sont plus sincères. Les larmes ne peuvent pas être méchantes ni vulgaires ou ironiques. Il y a beaucoup plus de vérité dans le malheur que dans l’apparence du bonheur. Agar est malheureuse, profondément malheureuse. Mais dans son malheur, elle a quand même un bonheur, celui de voir, une fois encore, un ange qui vient la consoler. Elle a aussi un autre « bonheur » : elle pleure, certes, mais elle voit le monde tel qu’il est. Elle pleure, mais en compensation « Dieu dessilla ses yeux. »iii

  • i L’original hébreu n’emploie pas d’article indéterminé devant le substantif ‘rire’, et par conséquent cette phrase se prête à deux interprétations : – « Dieu a fait de moi (Sara) un objet de dérision (on rira de moi) », ou encore : « Dieu m’a donné un sujet de joie (m’a fait rire) ». Ces deux interprétations vont dans des sens opposés. Mais compte tenu du caractère de Sara, déjà esquissé en Gen. 18,15, il est probable que la première interprétation est la meilleure. Mais qui sait ?

iiDans ce verset, il y a là un jeu de mot intraduisible. Isaac signifie : « Il rit ». Ce nom est bâti sur la racine TS-HA-Q, dont le sens est « rire ». Au prétérit, la forme verbale devient M-TS-HA-Q qui signifie dans ce contexte « rire avec sa femme », « se réjouir avec elle », et en tant que substantif : « caresse conjugale ». Yts’aq mts’éq : « Isaac (Celui qui rit) rit, se réjouit (sexuellement). »

iii Gen. 21, 19

Arrogance, humiliation, vision


Agar, servante de Sara, conçoit – à la demande de cette dernière – un fils avec Abraham.

Mais Agar est chassée au désert par Sara qui tire aigreur de sa grossesse.

Son nom, Agar, veut précisément dire « émigration ».

Enceinte et en fuite, elle rencontre un ange près d’un puits dans le désert.

Ce n’est pas la première fois qu’elle voit un ange.

Selon Rachi, Agar a vu des anges à quatre reprises dans la maison d’Abraham. Il précise « qu’elle n’en a jamais eu la moindre frayeur », car « elle était accoutumée à les voir ».

La rencontre d’Agar avec l’ange près du puits donne lieu à une scène fort curieuse. On assiste à un mystérieux échange verbal à propos d’au moins deux « visions ».

« Elle proclama le nom de l’Éternel [YHVY]qui lui avait parlé : « Tu es le Dieu [EL] de la vision car, dit-elle, n’ai-je pas vu, ici même, après que j’ai vu ? » C’est pourquoi on appela ce puits : « le puits du Vivant de ma vision » ; il se trouve entre Cadès et Béred. »i

Agar « proclame le nom de l’Éternel », non pas en prononçant ce nom même, qui est d’ailleurs imprononçable [YHVY], mais à l’aide d’une métaphore : « El Roÿ » (Dieu de la Vision).

Elle donne un nom (dicible) à la vision (indicible) qu’elle vient d’avoir.

Un peu plus tard, elle appelle l’Éternel une seconde fois avec un autre nom : «Haÿ Roÿ » (Le Vivant de la Vision). C’est de ce deuxième nom qu’elle se sert pour nommer le puits.

Agar donne deux noms différents, de même qu’elle a eu deux visions successives.

Elle emploie en effet deux fois le mot « vision » et deux fois l’expression « j’ai vu ».

Elle dit avoir eu une vision après avoir eu la première (« N’ai-je pas vu, ici même, après que j’ai vu ? »).

Le premier nom qu’elle donne à l’Éternel est fort original. Elle est la seule personne, dans toute la Bible, à lui donner ce nom : « El Roÿ ».

Le second nom est tout aussi original : « Haÿ Roÿ ».

Voilà une servante chassée dans le désert par sa maîtresse. Elle a deux visions, et elle invente deux noms inédits de Dieu !

Le nom qu’elle donne à la seconde vision est « Le Vivant ». La vision est bien « vivante », elle ne disparaît pas comme un songe, elle vit dans son âme, comme l’enfant s’agite dans son sein.

Le texte, pris littéralement, indique que Agar a bien eu deux visions successives. Mais ce n’est pas si simple.

Rachi pousse plus loin l’analyse, dans son commentaire du verset 9 :

« L’ANGE DU SEIGNEUR LUI DIT. Pour chaque parole, c’était un autre ange qui lui avait été envoyé. C’est pourquoi pour chaque parole on répète le mot UN ANGE. »

Selon le texte de la genèse, l’ange prend la parole à quatre reprises.

Si l’on suit Rachi, Agar a donc eu quatre visions correspondant à quatre anges différents.

Mais alors, si on ajoute les autres visions déjà vues dans la maison d’Abraham, également mentionnées par Rachi, Agar a eu au cours de sa vie au moins sept visions.

Alors ? Deux, quatre, sept ? Ou plus encore ? En tout cas, plusieurs.

L’ange qui parle la quatrième fois (ou le quatrième ange) dit à Sara:

« Tu mettras au monde un fils, tu le nommeras Ismaël, parce que Dieu a entendu ton affliction. »ii

Ismaël peut en effet se traduire par « Dieu a entendu ».

Agar a vu une vision et a entendu une voix divine. Dieu, lui aussi, a « entendu » Agar.

Mais pourquoi le texte ne dit-il pas que Dieu a « vu » son affliction ?

Je propose l’interprétation suivante : Dieu « entend » et « voit » Agar, mais il ne la « voit » pas séparément de son fils à naître. « Voyant » ainsi la mère et le fils, l’une enceinte de l’autre, il n’y « voit » pas de raison d’affliction. Il « voit » plutôt la vigoureuse poussée de vie à l’œuvre en son sein, et sa joie en germe.

L’affliction de Agar n’a en effet rien à voir avec sa grossesse, mais elle a tout à voir avec l’humiliation que lui impose Sara. C’est cette humiliation que Dieu a « entendue ».

Mais alors, pourquoi l’ange qui prend la parole la deuxième fois lui dit-il : « Retourne chez ta maîtresse et humilie-toi sous sa main. »iii ?

Pourquoi Dieu, qui a « entendu » l’affliction et l’humiliation de Agar, lui demande-t-il de retourner chez Abraham, et de s’humilier davantage encore ?

Dieu réserve sans doute aux affligés, aux humbles, aux humiliés, une grande gloire.

Le Très-Haut, le Tout-Puissant, n’a que faire de l’orgueil des hommes et de l’arrogance des maîtres.

Quant aux humbles, aux humiliés, oui, ils « voient », deux, quatre, sept fois. Ou plus encore.

i Gen. 16, 13-14. J’ai traduit ces versets mot à mot, en m’aidant de plusieurs versions disponibles. La version de la Bible de Jérusalem, aux Éditions du Cerf, est presque inutilisable car elle se contente de reproduire pour le nom de Dieu une transcription de l’hébreu, et suggère de plus en note que le texte est sans doute « corrompu ». La traduction du Rabbinat français est meilleure mais elle ajoute des mots qui ne sont pas littéralement dans le texte original. Elle traduit la fin du verset 13 ainsi : « Tu es le Dieu de la vision car, dit-elle, n’ai-je pas revu, ici même, la trace du Dieu après que je l’ai vu ? ». Pour ma part je n’ai pas trouvé trace du mot « trace » dans le texte hébreu.]

ii Gen. 16, 11

iiiGen. 16,9