God’s Names


–Mansour Al Hallaj–

The names of things are not reality. On the contrary, they veil it. The man who seeks the essence or nature of things will not find it in names that hide it, much more than they reveal it.

Hallâj developed this idea (deeper than it seems at first glance) in his theory of the « veil of name », ḥijâb al-ism.

The word « veil », ḥijâb (حِجاب), has a very general meaning here. It does not refer, as often in the media, to the woman’s veil, which is rather called burqa’ or sitâr, in classical Arabic.

The « veil of the name » placed on things is necessary. It is God Himself who is at the origin of it. The « veil » is there for the good of men. Reality without this « veil » would blind them, or make them lose consciousness.

Men need this « veil », and their own nature is itself covered in their eyes by another « veil ».

Hallâj formulates his theory as follows:

« He has clothed them (creating them) with the veil of their name, and they exist; but if He manifested to them the knowledge of His power, they would faint; and if He revealed to them the reality, they would die.»i

There was already the Jewish idea of assured death for the man who would see Godii. Here, death also awaits the man who would see, not God face to face, but only the world, nature or things, – without their veil.

What is this « veil of the name » placed over the world?

« The veil? It is a curtain, interposed between the seeker and his object, between the novice and his desire, between the shooter and his goal. One must hope that the veils are only for the creatures, not for the Creator. It is not God who wears a veil, it is the creatures he has veiled. » iii

And Hallâj here cracks a play on words, which does not lack wit, in Arabic, so fond of alliterations and paronomases: « i’jâbuka hijâbuka ».

Louis Massignon translates: « Your veil is your infatuation! » iv

I propose to translate rather, word for word: « Your wonder is your veil! ».

There is a real difference in nuance, and even meaning, between these two interpretations.

The translation of the word i’jâb by « wonder » is strictly in accordance with the translation found in dictionariesv . The word i’jâb, إِءْجاب , means « wonder, admiration ». It comes from the verbal root ‘ajiba,عَجِبَ, which means « to be amazed, to be seized with astonishment at the sight of something ».

It is the word ‘ujb ءُجْب, which also comes from the same root, but with a phonetization very different from i’jâb, which means « fatuity, sufficiency, admiration of oneself », the meaning chosen by Massignon to render the meaning of the word i’jâb.

From the semantic point of view, Massignon’s translation, which is lexically faulty, appears to be tinged above all with a certain ontological pessimism: man, by his « sufficiency », by his « infatuation », is supposed to have thus provoked a « veil » between himself and the object of his search, namely the divine. Man admires himself – how could he be concerned with anything else, for example, marveling at the divine?

Sticking to the dictionary, I translate i’jâb as « wonder », which opens up a very interesting and rich research avenue. Man has glimpsed a little of the divine splendor, a little of its glory, and he is « amazed » by it. But it is precisely for this reason that a « veil » is then placed over his mind to protect him from too much light, on the one hand, and to encourage him to continue his research, which is certainly infinite, on the other hand.

It is the wonder itself that must be veiled.

For it is wonder itself that is the veil.

Beyond wonder, which amazes and fills, there is astonishment, which incites, awakens, and sets in motion.

After his (mystical) joke Hallâj continued talking, and once again played with the verb ‘ajibtu (« I am surprised »): ‘ajibtu minka wa minni...

I translate: « I am seized with astonishment, by You, and by me. »

No trace of fatuity or vanity here. There is only astonishment there. The soul is overwhelmed by a double and dazzling intuition that Hallâj describes:

« I am seized with astonishment, by You, and by me, – O Vow of my desire!

You had brought me closer to You,

to the point that I thought You were my ‘me’,

Then You escaped in ecstasy,

to the point that you have deprived me of my ‘I’, in You.

O my happiness, during my life,

O my rest, after my burial!

It is no longer for me, outside of You, a jubilation,

if I judge by my fear and confidence,

Ah! in the gardens of Your intentions I have embraced all science,

And if I still desire one more thing,

It is You, all my desire! » vi

The Jewish religion, like the Muslim religion, has a real problem with the Name. The problem is that the Name (of the One) is certainly not one, but multiple.

Ibn ‘Ata’ Allah writes: « He who invokes by this name Allah invokes by the same token the thousand names contained in all the revealed books. »vii

The name « Allah » comes from the contraction of the definite article al, ال, « the », and the common noun ilah, إِلَه , « god, divinity », plural âliha آلِهة.

In pre-Islamic times, a creator god named Allah already existed within the Arab polytheistic pantheon.

« The god », or « the deity », al ilah, merge into the word allah (the capital letter does not exist in Arabic), ٱللَّه which is traditionally written الله. viii

Henri Meschonnic, a serialpolemicist, never one to rest on sharp points and sarcastic persiflings, notes on this subject: « The very name of Allah, according to the commonly accepted etymology, has nothing that distinguishes it. It is by designating the god, that it signifies him. A name that is ‘a defect of a name’, where we have seen ‘repercussions on Islam whose mystical elements seem to create uncertainty as to the true name of God »ixx.

In this field, uncertainty seems to be universal. Thus, Jewish solutions as to the « true name of God » increase the number of questions by multiplying the nominalization of God’s attributes, or their antonyms. Or again by artificially presenting the word « name » שֵׁם (chem) for the Name of God (which one does not name):

וְקָרָאתִי בְשֵׁם יְהוָה, לְפָנֶיךָ

v’qarati bishem Adonai lefanikh

« And I will call by the ‘Name’ YHVH, in front of your face.»xi

What is that Name (chem) that the word YHVH can’t tell?

A little later, the Lord came down from the cloud, approached Moses, and : « He called by the Name, YHVH », וַיִּקְרָא בְשֵׁם, יְהוָה . xii

What is this Name? Not just « YHVH », only, – but rather a very long enumeration, beginning with a triple enunciation (twice YHVH and once EL), and continuing with a litany of attributes, the first of which are:

וַיִּקְרָא, יְהוָה יְהוָה, אֵל רַחוּם וְחַנּוּן–אֶרֶךְ אַפִַם, וְרַב-חֶסֶד וֶאֱמ

« And He calls YHVH YHVH God (El) Merciful Clement Slow to Anger Rich in Grace and Faithfulnessxiii.

And the Litany of Names continues, precise and contradictory, and extending endlessly through the generations: « Custodian of His grace to thousands, Tolerating fault, transgression and sin, Leaving nothing unpunished, Punishing the faults of fathers on children and grandchildren, until the third and fourth generation. » xiv

Let’s summarize. The real Name of YHVH is quite a long name:

יְהוָה יְהוָה אֵל רַחוּם וְחַנּוּן–אֶרֶךְ אַפִַם, וְרַב-חֶסֶד וֶאֱמ

נֹצֵר חֶסֶד לָאֲלָפִים נֹשֵׂא עָוֺן וָפֶשַׁע וְחַטָּאָה; וְנַקֵּה, לֹא יְנַקֶּה–פֹּקֵד עֲוֺן אָבוֹת עַל-בָּנִים וְעַל-בְּנֵי בָנִים עַל-שִׁלֵּשִׁים וְעַל-רִבֵּעִים

Does this Name seem a bit long?

Actually all the letters of the Torah put together may also form His Name.

So which solution is better?

An unpronounceable name (יְהוָה), a name of six hundred thousand letters, or الله, a « defect of a name »?

I find Hallâj’s solution to this question very elegant.

Hallâj simply calls Him: « You! »

_______________

iSulamî, tabaqât; Akhb., n°1. Quoted by Louis Massignon. The passion of Husayn Ibn Mansûr Hallâj. Volume III. Gallimard. 1975, p. 183.

iiEx 33.20

iiiMs. London 888, f. 326 b. Quoted by Louis Massignon. The passion of Husayn Ibn Mansûr Hallâj. Volume III. Gallimard. 1975, p. 184

ivLouis Massignon. The passion of Husayn Ibn Mansûr Hallâj. Volume III. Gallimard. 1975, p. 184

vI consulted the Larousse Arab-French Dictionary, as well as Kazimirsky’s Arab-French Dictionary.

viLouis Massignon. The passion of Husayn Ibn Mansûr Hallâj. Volume III. Gallimard. 1975, p. 184

viiIbn ‘Ata’ Allah, Treatise on the Name Allah, p.106.

viiiThe Wikipedia article on Allah states: Most opinions converge on the view that the word is composed of al and ilāh (the deity, a definite case) and that the first vowel of the word (i) has been removed by apocope, because of the frequency of use of the word. This opinion is also attributed to the famous grammarian Sībawayh (8th century). The word consists of the article ال al, which marks the determination as the French article « le » and has an unstable hamza (letter), and ilāh إِلَاه or ilah إِلَه, which means « (un) god ». Al followed by ilāh is the determined form, would give Allāh (« the God »)2 by apocope of the second term. The word would then have been univerbé. The term Allah is etymologically related to the terms for the deity in the Semitic languages: He or El. Allah is the Arabic form of the generic divine invocation in the Bible: « Elijah, » « Eli » or « Eloi » meaning « My God » in Hebrew. The Akkadians already used the word ilu to say « god » between 4000 and 2000 BC. In pre-Islamic times, the Arabic term Ilâh was used to designate a deity2. The name Allâhumma, sometimes used in prayer, could be the counterpart of the name « Elohim » (plural of majesty of Eloha meaning « God » in the Bible). (…)

For some, this explanation is not valid and would be based on popular etymology. It would be all the more astonishing since the apocope of the i in ʾilāh is not very credible because it is the first vowel of the word really meaning « god ». They also put forward the fact that terms considered sacred are often preserved by taboo. On the other hand, the radical ʾel or ʾil designating a deity is frequent in other Semitic languages: in Hebrew, אל El (« god »), אלהים Elohim (« gods »), ʾāllāhā in Aramaic, could be at the origin of the Arabic word by borrowing then amuising the final ā (which is in Aramaic a disinential vowel, which are rarely pronounced in common Arabic) and finally shortening the first ā by metanalysis and confusion with the article ʾal. One approach would be to derive the name of Allah from another root than إِلَهٌ. For some, the name would derive from al and lâh, from the verb لَاهَ which means « veiled », « elevated », which could associate this name with the meaning of the « Most High ».

ixJ. Chelhod. The structures & of the sacred among the Arabs. Paris, 1964. p.98

xHenri Meschonnic. « God absent, God present in language « . In L’utopie du Juif. Edition Desclée de Brouwer. Paris, 2001, p. 198-199

xiEx 33.19

xiiEx 34.5

xiiiEx 34, 6

xivEx 34.7

« I don’t Need a Face »


-Angelus Novus. Paul Klee-

Gershom Scholem immigrated to Israel in 1923 and settled in Jerusalem. He was very disappointed, there. With raw and disenchanted words, his poems testify to his feelings.

Under the title « Sad Redemption », Scholem wrote in 1926:

« The glory of Zion seems to be over.

Reality has been able to resist

Will its rays know unexpectedly

how to penetrate to the heart of the world?

(…)

God could never be closer to you.

When despair eats away at you

In the light of Zion, itself shipwrecked. »i

It is possible that these poems were also, maybe, the bearers of yet another hope, a secret one, – obviously a burning one, which could however not be formulated.

But it is fact that he had lost his faith.

For him it was already nightfall.

« I lost that faith

Who led me here.

But since I recanted

It is dark all around. » ii

On June 23, 1930, he wrote another poem, which shows the depth of his dereliction, – and also opens a path, pierces every fence, projects himself in the broad, in the vast, – in the world, and exile himself, in thought, again.

« But the day has desecrated us.

What grows requires night.

We are delivered to powers,

By us unsuspected.

Incandescent history

Threw us into its flames,

Ruined the secret splendor,

Offered to the market, too visible, then.

It was the darkest hour

An awakening out of the dream.

Yet those who were wounded to death

Barely noticed it.

What was inside

Transformed, passing outside,

The dream has turned violent,

We are out again,

And Zion is formless. » iii

How to interpret this radical change in his state of mind?

Should we understand it as the terrible disappointment of an idealistic soul, unable to bear the violence of the reality, the one he had before his eyes, or to stomach the repetition of yet another violence, known to him, under other forms, and under other longitudes?

Or should we understand it as a terrible naivety, not suspecting what was inevitably to come, and which was already looming in 1930, on the slimy, red and black threatening stage of History?

Two years before leaving for Israel, Gershom Scholem had addressed a poem to Walter Benjamin, on July 15, 1921, – entitled « The Angel’s Salute ».

At his friend’s request, he had kept on his behalf Paul Klee’s famous drawing (belonging to Walter Benjamin) at home and had placed it on the wall in his Berlin apartment.

Klee’s « Angelus Novus » was to be later on called the « Angel of History », by Walter Benjamin himself, shortly before his suicide in France.

In his poem, « The Angel’s Salute », Scholem made the « Angel of History » say :

« I’m on the wall, and beautiful,

I don’t look at anyone,

Heaven sent me,

I am the angelic man.

In the room where I am, the man is very good,

But I’m not interested in him.

I am under the protection of the Most High

And I don’t need a face ». iv

Gershom Scholem obviously sees himself as this « good man », who houses the Angel in his « room », – but Scholem, apparently, was struck that he did not interest the « angelic man ».

In fact, Klee’s Angel really does not « look at anyone ».

But it was Scholem’s idea that the Angel allegedly did not « need any face »…

Why this angelic indifference?

Maybe because Klee’s Angel only sees Elyon’s Face?

Or maybe because any angel’s face is already « all faces » (panim)?

Or perhaps because any face, as the Hebrew word panim teaches it, is in itself a plurality.

And then all the faces of History form an infinite plurality of pluralities.

Or maybe the Angel does not need plurality, nor the plurality of pluralities, but only needs the One?

There is something overwhelming to imagine that the « Angel of History » is not interested in the « good man » in the 1930’s, and that he does not need to look at his good face, or at any other human face for that matter.

What does this jaded Angel come to do, then, on this wall, in this room, in the center of Berlin, in the 1920’s?

Thinking of it, a century later, I had to turn to yet another voice.

« At least one face had to answer

To all the names in the world.» v

_________________

iGershom Scholem. The Religious Origins of Secular Judaism. From Mysticism to Enlightenment. Calmann-Lévy, 2000, p. 303.

iiGershom Scholem. « Media in Vita ». (1930-1933) The Religious Origins of Secular Judaism. From Mysticism to Enlightenment. Calmann-Lévy, 2000, p. 304.

iiiGershom Scholem. « Encounter with Zion and the World (The Decline) « . (June 23, 1930). The Religious Origins of Secular Judaism. From Mysticism to Enlightenment. Calmann-Lévy, 2000, p. 304.

ivGershom Scholem. « Hail from the angel (to Walter for July 15, 1921) ». The Religious Origins of Secular Judaism. From Mysticism to Enlightenment. Calmann-Lévy, 2000, p. 304

vPaul Éluard . Capitale de la douleur. XXIX – Poetry/Gallimard 1966 (my translation)

La puissance du continu et les portes de la mort


-Charles S. Peirce-

Charles Sanders Peirce affirma en 1893 l’idée d’un principe fondamental de continuité, gouvernant le champ tout entier de la réalité expérimentale, et jusqu’à la moindre de ses parties.i

Une conséquence de ce principe, s’il venait à être confirmé, serait que toute assertion, toute proposition, quelle qu’elle soit, devrait être considérée comme relativement indéfinie, c’est-à-dire impossible à qualifier de façon absolue. Comme notre expérience ne peut jamais dépasser ici-bas une certaine limite, en soi intangible, que l’on peut appeler l’Absolu, elle ne peut donc pas être absolument définissable. On sait qu’une proposition qui n’a aucune relation avec l’expérience est en général dépourvue de toute significationii. De là on peut déduire qu’une proposition qui n’a qu’une relation partielle avec l’expérience totale (ou l’expérience de l’Absolu), ne peut être que relative, et donc indéfinie.

Pour marquer les esprits, Peirce forgea un néologisme, celui de « synechism » à partir du mot grec συνεχισμός, tiré de συνεχής, « continu ». De même que le matérialisme est la doctrine selon laquelle tout est « matière », que tout est « idée » pour l’idéalisme, ou tout peut être divisé en deux pour les tenants du dualisme, de même, selon le synékhisme tout peut être considéré comme « continu ».

Appliqué aux questions métaphysiques, le principe du synékhisme induit des conséquences curieuses, paradoxales et même franchement énigmatiques.

On connaît la célèbre phrase de Parménide, ἒστι γὰρ εἶναι μηδέν δ’οὐκ ἒστιν, « l’être est et le non-être n’est pas »iii.

C’est là une assertion qui semble plausible, mais le synékhisme en nie tout bonnement la validité, affirmant plutôt qu’il y a seulement plus ou moins d’être, et que, à la marge, l’être se fond donc insensiblement avec le non-être.

Quand nous disons qu’une chose est, c’est aussi dire que, dans la perspective d’un progrès intellectuel ad hoc, cette chose pourrait atteindre un statut permanent dans le royaume des idées.

Cependant, comme aucune question relevant de l’expérience actuelle ne peut être traitée avec une absolue certitude, selon le synékhisme, de même on ne peut jamais être certain qu’une idée particulière restera établie éternellement, ou au contraire sera un jour absolument réfutée.

Cela revient à dire que quelque objet ou quelque étant que ce soit n’a qu’une existence imparfaite, et que l’on ne peut porter sur lui qu’un jugement a priori relatif.

Si ce principe de continuité, le synékhisme, a bien une valeur universelle, et pour quelle raison ne l’aurait-il pas?, alors il ne s’applique pas seulement à la petite province que nous appelons la « matière », mais il s’applique aussi à l’immense empire des idées, et à celui de l' »esprit ».

Ce principe ne peut pas non plus s’appliquer seulement aux phénomènes apparents, mais il s’étend aussi à la substance qui leur est sous-jacente, et qui leur donne d’être.

Le synékhisme ne peut traiter, à l’évidence, de ce qui est par nature inconnaissable, mais en l’occurrence, quoiqu’il ne puisse prétendre traiter de la substance en soi, il n’admettra pas une séparation nette entre les phénomènes et la substance dont ils émanent. Car cette substance qui est sous-jacente au phénomène et qui le détermine est elle-même, dans une certaine mesure, un phénomène.

Le synékhisme, en tant que principe du « continu », ne peut se conformer aux philosophie dualistes. Mais il ne tient pas pour autant à exterminer la notion du « deux ». Car le deux, ou la dyade, Platon nous l’a montré, est une émanation de l' »un ».

On sait que le dualisme, pris dans son sens large, est une philosophie qui opère ses analyses à la hache, laissant après coup, comme éléments ultimes, des brisures d’être ou des morceaux d’étants, désormais non reliés entre eux; ce résultat sanglant est parfaitement étranger à la conception synékhiste.

En particulier, le synékhisme refuse de considérer que les phénomènes physiques et psychiques sont entièrement distincts, qu’ils relèvent de deux catégories différentes de substance, et qu’ils sont séparés par une sorte de mur ontologique.

Pour le synékhisme, tous les phénomènes possèdent la même essence, bien que certains apparaissent plus spontanés et « psychiques », et d’autres plus « matériels » et réguliers. De fait, tous les phénomènes présentent un mélange de liberté et de déterminisme, qui leur permet d’être, et surtout d’être orientés (vers une fin).

C’est pourquoi jamais un synékhiste ne dira: « Je suis seulement moi-même, et pas du tout vous. » Le synékhisme abjure cette métaphysique de la différence, qui induit une philosophie du mal.

Pour le synékhisme, le prochain est dans une certaine mesure nous-même. Réellement, le « soi » que l’on aime s’attribuer, est pour une part essentielle, la vulgaire illusion résultant de notre propre vanité.

Tous les êtres qui nous ressemblent, ou qui se trouvent être dans des circonstances analogues aux nôtres, sont aussi, d’une certaine façon, nous-même, quoique pas tout-à-fait de la même façon que notre prochain est aussi nous-même.

Est tout-à-fait dans l’esprit du synékhisme, l’hymne brahmanique qui commence par ces mots: « Je suis le Soi, pur et infini, je suis la béatitude, l’éternel, le manifeste, j’emplis tout, je suis la substance de tout ce qui a nom et forme ».iv

Il exprime sans fards le rabaissement nécessaire, l’humiliation consentie du pauvre Soi individuel, emporté par l’esprit de la prière, et s’unissant continûment au Soi.

Tout homme est capable de jouer un rôle dans le grand drame de la Création, et s’il se perd dans ce rôle, quelle que soit son humilité, alors il s’identifie avec son Créateur.

Le synékhisme, bien compris, fait voir que toute communication d’esprit à esprit ne se fait que grâce à la continuité synékhiste de l’être, et surtout qu’elle est effectivement possible grâce à elle.

Le synékhisme nie qu’il y ait des différences absolues entre les phénomènes quels qu’ils soient, de même qu’il nie qu’il y a une différence absolue entre le sommeil et l’éveil. « Je dors, mais mon cœur veille »v

Le synékhisme refuse de croire que la conscience charnelle disparaît aussitôt que la mort vient. Comment cela se peut-il? C’est difficile à dire, puisque nous manquons de données observées.

L’assurance synékhiste d’une vie après la mort peut sembler n’être qu’une sorte de proclamation oraculaire, aux fondements énigmatiques.

Shakespeare lui aussi l’a mise en scène, cette question, la seule question qui vaille d’être reposée sans cesse :

« …To die — to sleep —

To sleep! perchance to dream; – Ay, there’s the rub,

For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,

When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,

Must give us pause. »vi

Oui, il faut faire ici une pause, une petite minute de silence au moins, avant la grande éternité de la Nuit. Nous sommes si pusillanimes, devant le grand saut dans l’Inconnu, et celui-ci pourrait se révéler bien différent de tout ce qu’on imagine:

« …Who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death
The undiscover’d country, from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of? »vii

Le synékhisme reconnaît comme évident que la conscience charnelle n’est qu’une petite partie de ce qui constitue l’homme.

Il y a aussi la conscience sociale, par laquelle l’homme s’incarne dans les autres hommes. Cette conscience sociale continue de vivre et de respirer après la mort pendant bien plus longtemps que ce que des observateurs superficiels pourraient croire.viii

Enfin, il y a la conscience spirituelle de l’homme. C’est elle qui le constitue comme vérité éternelle, comme idée de lui-même, et qui a vocation, après la mort, à être désormais incarnée dans l’Univers pris dans son infinie totalité. L’homme spirituel devient l’archétype de lui-même, et cet archétype est immortel et indestructible, il vit dans le monde à venir, et il est destiné à bénéficier d’une nouvelle incarnation, spirituelle, singulière, unique. Peut-être même glorieuse, en tout cas lumineuse.

Lorsque notre conscience charnelle passera à travers les portes de la mort, nous percevrons alors que nous avions aussi en nous, pendant toute notre vie, une conscience spirituelle, qui vivait de sa vie propre, secrète, dont nous n’étions pas vraiment conscient, et dont nous confondions les signes et les appels, avec ceux de notre conscience charnelle et ses désirs.

Le synékhisme n’est pas une religion, je tiens à le dire, c’est une hypothèse philosophique, dotée d’un fort degré de probabilité.

____________________

iCharles S. Peirce. « Immortality in the Light of Synechism » (4 Mai 1893) in The Essential Peirce. Selected Philosophical Writings. Vol.2. The Peirce Edition Project. Indiana University Press, 1998, p.1

ii« Continuity governs the whole domain of experience in every element of it. Accordingly, every proposition, except so far as it relates to an unattainable limit of experience (which I call the Absolute), is to be taken with an indefinite qualification; for a proposition which has no relation whatever to experience is devoid of all meaning. » Ibid.

iiiParménide, fragment B VI, Les Présocratiques, traduction du grec par Jean-Paul Dumont, Bibliothèque de la Pléiade, 1988, p.260

ivThe Metaphysics of the Upanishads, or Vichar Sagar, by Niscaladasa, trad. Lala Sreeram, Calcutta, Heeralal Dhole, 1885. p.1

vCt 5,2. Cf. mon article, Les quatre états de la conscience, https://metaxu.org/2021/10/10/les-quatre-etats-de-la-conscience/

viSkakespeare. Hamlet. Acte III scène 1

viiSkakespeare. Hamlet. Acte III scène 1

viiiCf. Gustave Freytag. The Lost Manuscript. 1865, Préface à l’édition américaine: « A noble human life does not end on earth with death. It continues in the minds and the deeds of friends, as well as in the thoughts and the activity of the nation. » (Une noble vie humaine ne finit par sur terre avec la mort. Elle continue dans l’esprit et les actions des amis, et dans les pensées et les activités de la nation.)

Gustav Freytag a aussi écrit, dans son livre « Autobiographical Reminiscences »: « It is well that from us men usually remains concealed, what is inheritance from the remote past, and what the independent acquisition of our own existence; since our life would become full of anxiety and misery, if we, as continuations of the men of the past, had perpetually to reckon with the blessings and curses which former times leave hanging over the problems of our own existence. But it is indeed a joyous labor, at times, by a retrospective glance into the past, to bring into fullest consciousness the fact that many of our successes and achievements have only been made possible through the possessions that have come to us from the lives of our parents, and through that also which the previous ancestral life of our family has accomplished and produced for us. »

Ce passage a suscité le commentaire d’un préfacier, dont je donne l’extrait suivant parce qu’il propose une interprétation « sociale » de la transmigration des âmes, et forge de plus une intéressante métaphore « éditoriale » de la progression de la vie psychique:

« Is not this a revival of the old idea of the transmigration of souls? To be sure, the soul is not a material thing made of an invisible and airy substance, fluttering about after death and entering into another body. There are no material migrations of soul taking place, however tenuous the substance of the soul might be imagined to be. The memories of the present, our recollection of our past existence, depend on the fact that the living matter which is constantly replacing itself in us by other living matter, like the water in a wave rolling on the surface of the sea, always assumes the same form. It is the form that is constantly reproducing. In this sense, man (that is his soul) is the product of education. The soul of the future man stands in the same relation to our soul as the future edition of a book, revised and enlarged, stands to its present edition. One man impresses his modes of thought, his habits, his methods of action, his ideals upon his fellow men, and thus implants his very soul into their lives. In this sense a transmigration of souls is taking place constantly, and he who opens his eyes will see it. »

Les quatre états de la conscience


« Je dors mais mon cœur veille » (Ct 5,2).

Le Cantique des cantiques a fait couler beaucoup d’encre, et suscité de multiples interprétations.

Parmi elles, beaucoup me chaut (du verbe chaloir) la figure de la Sulamite comme métaphore de la conscience, face à son propre mystère, et face à son Créateur.

« Je dors mais mon cœur veille ». Ani yéchnah, vé libbi ‘er.i

Quand la conscience est assoupie, une autre forme de conscience, — dont nous n’avons pas clairement conscience –, semble veiller encore.

Comment, et pourquoi? Existe-t-il d’autres formes de ‘conscience’ encore, dont nous n’aurions pas conscience, et qui par exemple opéreraient lors du sommeil profond?

Quand notre conscience active est apparemment « endormie », reste en éveil une conscience dans la nuit, qui semble résider dans le « cœur », et qui « veille » sur le sommeil de la conscience du jour. Cette conscience sise dans le « cœur » n’est pas de l’ordre du mental, puisqu’en l’occurrence le mental dort. Relève-t-elle alors de l’intuition, de la psyché, de l’âme, ou de quelque autre entité spirituelle?

Que signifie d’ailleurs le ‘cœur’ (levav, en hébreu, lev en chaldéen), particulièrement dans le contexte biblique?

Le dictionnaire offre une large gamme de sens.ii

A les examiner attentivement, il apparaît clairement que le cœur est lui-même bien plus profond et plus complexe qu’on ne saurait l’exprimer, et que son essence ne saurait être rendue par quelque acception que ce soit. Non seulement une formule singulière ne saurait le définir, mais toutes celles que l’on peut lui attribuer ouvrent incessamment de nouvelles pistes à la recherche.

Si le cœur veille sur la conscience qui sommeille, on peut en induire en principe la possible mise en parallèle de la conscience classique avec d’autres modalités plus cachées et plus diversifiées de conscience. D’autres formes de conscience, plus subtiles, peuvent habiter souterrainement le même moi…

Pour fixer les idées, et entamer le débat, je distinguerai ici cinq formes possibles de conscience.

Mais comme la conscience est un phénomène éminemment complexe, il pourrait y en avoir bien davantage. Des dizaines de niveaux de conscience pourraient être envisagés a priori.

On pourrait même postuler l’hypothèse d’une infinité de niveaux de conscience, si l’on se représente que la conscience divine est infiniment repliée sur elle-même, ou, ce qui revient au même, qu’elle se déplie infiniment elle-même dans l’infini de sa puissance. Dans ses plis, elle cache ce qu’elle fut (en puissance), et dans ses replis elle donne de la lumière à ce qu’elle est en train de devenir (en acte).

Les cinq formes possibles de conscience que j’énonce ici représentent diverses manières de conjuguer conscience et inconscient, ou au contraire de les séparer:

1.Il y a la conscience qui sent, pense, raisonne, cogite, veut, et qu’on appellera ‘conscience consciente’.

2.Il y a la conscience du ‘cœur’, pour reprendre l’image du Cantique des cantiques. Elle semble sub-consciente et elle ne se révèle que lorsque la ‘conscience consciente’ s’assoupit, montrant alors qu’elle veille, sur notre sommeil, nos rêves, et nos aspirations.

3.Il y a, comme l’enseignent Freud et Jung, chacun à sa manière, un inconscient (personnel) dont on a bien conscience qu’il existe en effet, sans avoir exactement conscience de la profondeur et de la nature de son contenu.

A propos de l’inconscient personnel, la ‘conscience consciente’ et la ‘conscience du cœur’ se forment une conscience sous-jacente, implicite, latente, et peu informée, en fait, de la réalité de l’inconscient cosmique.

4. Il y a dans cet ‘inconscient cosmique’, infini en soi, plusieurs niveaux de profondeurs et d’obscurité. On y trouve par exemple le ça, le Soi, et les archétypes de l’inconscient dit « collectif », auxquels on pourrait ajouter tous les archétypes du vivant non-humain, et même, pourquoi pas les archétypes du non-vivant animé (comme les virus, les prions, ou les particules élémentaires…).

Cet inconscient infini est pour partie ‘conscient’ du Soi. Cette conscience du Soi représente une quatrième forme de conscience.

5. Mais, et c’est là une hypothèse, il y a aussi une part infinie de l’inconscient cosmique qui reste ‘inconsciente’ du Soi.

Notons que ces cinq catégories hybrident de façon spécifique conscience et inconscient. Elles sont seulement indicatives, et elles seraient propres à de nouvelles hybridations, et dépassements, sur d’autres bases, restant à découvrir.

On pourrait d’ailleurs, comme on l’a dit, imaginer que Dieu Lui-même dispose d’une infinité de niveaux de conscience.

Pourquoi parler d’une infinité de niveaux et non pas d’une seule conscience (divine) puisque le Dieu unique est un Dieu Un?

Dans le contexte du judaïsme, pourtant peu suspect de renoncer facilement au principe du Dieu Un, la Cabale juive n’hésite pas à poser dix Sefirot, comme autant d’émanations du Dieu Un, susceptibles de le « représenter » dans le monde ici-bas, d’une manière plus singularisée.

Si le Dieu du monothéisme juif se fait représenter par dix Sefirot, et si la Torah enseigne que le Dieu unique est apparu à Abraham sous la forme de trois « hommes », on pourrait formuler l’idée que, après tout, certaines synthèses supérieures sont peut-être possibles entre monothéisme et polythéisme.

Les théologies de l’Un et du Multiple, de la transcendance ou de l’immanence, sont-elles irréconciliables? En apparence oui.

En réalité, il se pourrait que l’Un ne soit pas réellement « un », comme le disait déjà Damascios, citant Platon: « L’Un, s’Il est, n’est même pas un. »iii

L’Un, qu’il soit platonicien, plotinien ou hébraïque, dans sa pure transcendance, ne peut certes pas être limité par un attribut quantitatif, comme l’idée toute arithmétique de « l’un ». Et s’il n’est pas numériquement « un », c’est que le concept infiniment riche de « l’Un » inclut et intègre nécessairement le multiple dans son unitéiv.

Plutôt que d’employer la formule de « l’Un », Damascios préfère d’ailleurs l’expression grecque ‘panté aporêton, qui peut se traduire comme « l’absolument indicible ». Elle rend compte de l’idée de Platon selon laquelle l’Un est inconnaissable (agnostôn) et indicible (arrêton).v

Si la Divinité est « absolument indicible », peut-être n’est-Elle pas entièrement dicible pour Elle-même, et à Elle-même?

Elle serait donc en partie inconsciente d’Elle-même.

Certes il faudrait alors, provisoirement, renoncer au dogme de l’omniscience divine, et reporter la mise en acte de cette omniscience à quelque fin des Temps, éminemment reculée…

Mais ce dogme est fortement problématique, de toutes façons.

En effet si Dieu était effectivement absolument omniscient et omnipotent, Il aurait alors les moyens de prévenir dès avant la Création l’existence de tout Mal. Ce qu’Il n’a pas fait. C’est donc, soit qu’Il n’est pas Omniscient et Omnipotent, soit qu’Il n’est pas Bon.

Dans les deux cas, il y a place pour un Inconscient divin…

Autrement dit, et par contraste, il se pourrait que dans l’infinité en puissance de la Divinité, il y ait bien, latente, une infinité de niveaux de conscience et d’inconscient.

Mais revenons aux cinq niveaux de conscience que je décrivais un peu plus haut.

Dans la tradition védique, on trouve explicitement énoncés quatre niveaux de conscience, présentés comme les quatre états de l’Ātman, ou du Soi.

La Divinité, une et suprême, que les Upaniṣad appellent le brahman, se présente elle-même ainsi:

« Je suis le Voyant, pur, et par nature, Je ne change pas. Par nature, il n’y a pas d’objet pour Moi, étant l’Infini, complètement plein, de face, à travers, en haut, en bas et dans toutes les directions. Je suis non-né, et Je réside en Moi-même. »vi

Puis la Divinité décrit les trois niveaux de conscience des créatures rationnelles et humaines (éveil, rêve, sommeil profond) et indique qu’ils sont absolument incapables d’entrer en rapport avec Elle-même de manière signifiante.

Elle oppose en fait ces trois niveaux de la conscience humaine à un quatrième niveau de la conscience, qui correspond à la sienne propre, et qu’elle nomme elliptiquement « le Quatrième ».

« Que ce soit dans l’état de sommeil profond, d’éveil ou bien de rêve, aucune perception trompeuse n’apparaît dans ce monde-ci, qui puisse Me concerner. Comme ces trois états de conscience n’ont aucune existence, ni autonome ni dépendante, Je suis toujours le Quatrièmevii, le Voyant et le non-duel. »viii

Ces quatre états de la conscience sont finement explicités par la Māṇḍūkya-Upaniṣad.

« Car le brahman est ce Tout. Le brahman est ce Soi (ātman), et ce Soi a quatre quarts.

L’état de veille, connaissant ce qui est extérieur, ayant sept membres, dix-neuf bouches, faisant l’expérience du grossier, est Vaiśvānara « l’universel »ix — le premier quart.

L’état de rêve, connaissant ce qui est intérieur, ayant sept membres, dix-neuf bouches, faisant l’expérience du subtil, est Taijasa « le lumineux » — deuxième quart.

Lorsque, endormi, on ne désire aucun désir, on ne voit aucun rêve, c’est le sommeil profond. L’état de sommeil profond est un, il est un seul bloc de connaissance car, fait de félicité, il fait l’expérience de la félicité. Il est la bouche de la conscience, il est le connaissant (prājña) — troisième quart.

C’est lui le Seigneur de tout, lui le connaisseur de tout, lui le maître intérieur; il est la matrice de tout, car l’origine et la fin des êtres.

Ni connaissant ce qui est intérieur, ni connaissant ce qui est extérieur, ni connaissant l’un et l’autre ensemble, ni bloc de connaissance, ni connaissant ni non-connaissant, ni visible, ni lié à l’action, insaisissable, indéfinissable, impensable, innommable, essence de la connaissance du Soi unique, ce en quoi le monde se résorbe, tout de paix, bienveillant, non duel — on le considère comme le Quatrième. C’est lui, le Soi qu’il faut discerner. »x

Le « Quatrième » (état de conscience). En sanskrit: turīya. On voit qu’il ne se définit que par une série de négations, mais aussi deux affirmations positives: il est « tout de paix » et « bienveillant ».

Il est intéressant de s’arrêter un instant sur la racine du mot turīya (तुरीय): TṜ (तॄ) dont le sens est « traverser ». Louis Renouxi estime qu’elle révèle l’essence du mot « quatrième » (turīya), qu’il faut comprendre comme « ce qui traverse, ce qui est ou ce qui conduit au-delà ».

On ne peut résister au plaisir de rapprocher cette racine sanskrite TṜ (तॄ) de la racine hébraïque ‘abar (עבר) qui a le même sens: « passer, aller au travers, traverser; aller au-delà, franchir, dépasser », et qui est aussi la racine même du mot « hébreu »…

Comme on a vu, la Sulamite est consciente de deux états, celui de la veille et celui du sommeil, pendant lequel c’est le cœur qui veille.

Mais que se passe-t-il, pourrait-on demander, quand la Sulamite n’est même plus consciente que son cœur veille?

Que se passe-t-il pour elle quand elle entre dans le « sommeil profond »?

Un autre commentaire de Śaṅkara permet de cerner cette notion de sommeil profond, et ce qu’elle implique.

« Lorsque l’on pense: ‘Je n’ai rien vu du tout dans l’état de sommeil profond’, on ne dénie pas sa propre Vision, on nie seulement ses propres notions. »xii

Autrement dit, on ne nie pas sa capacité à voir, qui reste intacte dans le sommeil profond, on constate seulement qu’il n’y a alors rien à voir, du moins apparemment.

En effet on peut arguer qu’il reste à voir dans le sommeil profond qu’il n’y a rien à y voir, et aussi qu’il reste à observer la conscience en train de prendre conscience de sa singulière nature, qui est de continuer d’exister, alors qu’elle est censée n’être plus consciente d’elle-même, ce qui est un paradoxe, admettons-le, pour une « Pure Conscience »…

La Pure Conscience continue d’exister, bien qu’elle n’ait (momentanément) rien à considérer, mais comment prend-elle conscience de sa pure existence, sans avoir le moyen de l’exercer sur quelque réalité « visible »?

« Personne ne voit rien dans l’état de sommeil profond, mais ceci ne veut pas dire que dans le sommeil profond, la Pure Conscience cesse d’exister. C’est seulement parce qu’il n’y a aucun objet visible que rien n’est vu dans le sommeil profond, et non pas parce que la Pure Conscience cesse d’être. C’est grâce à la Pure Conscience que l’on peut dénier alors l’existence d’objets visibles. »xiii

Les Écritures (védiques) affirment « l’existence de la Conscience et son immuabilité, disant que telle personne atteint sa propre ‘illumination’xiv et que ‘il n’y a pas de disparition de la vision pour le voyant, à cause de son indestructibilité’xv, déclarant la périssabilité des notions. Ainsi les Écritures elles-mêmes séparent les notions de l’Éveil. »xvi

La tradition védique, on le voit, a longuement théorisé ces quatre états de la conscience: la veille, le rêve, le sommeil profond, et ce qu’elle appelle le « quatrième » [état], à savoir l’Éveil.

Il y a là une sorte d’échelle de Jacob de la conscience, avec quatre niveaux successifs.

Ceci n’épuise pas le tout du mystère.

On subodore que chacun de ces niveaux de conscience développe en lui-même des profondeurs propres.

Reprenant l’image de la conscience dont la Sulamite nous offre l’image inoubliable, on en vient à imaginer d’autres ordres de complexité encore.

Chaque niveau de conscience possède sa richesse propre, qui est développable horizontalement, en quelque sorte, et pas seulement verticalement, par intrication avec des niveaux supérieurs.

Pour aider à percevoir ces phénomènes d’intrication entre l’horizontal et le vertical, l’hébreu biblique peut fournir de précieuses indications, comme langue mémorielle, au moins autant que le sanskrit, langue sacrée, chacune avec son génie propre.

Partons du mot « veille »,עֵר, ‘er, employé par la Sulamite.

Ce mot vient du verbe hébreu עוּר, ‘iwer, « être éveillé, veiller, se réveiller ». Cette racine verbale possède un autre sens, particulièrement remarquable dans le contexte où nous nous situons: « aveugler, rendre aveugle ».

Tout se passe comme si « être éveillé » équivalait à une sorte de cécité.

Lorsque l’on cherche dans le texte biblique toutes les racines verbales associées d’une façon ou une autre à l’idée de ‘veille’, on en trouve principalement cinq:

עוּר (iwer) « être éveillé, se réveiller »

צפה (tsafah) « voir, regarder, surveiller, épier, observer, espérer »xvii

שָׁקֵד (chaqed) « veiller »xviii

נָצַר (natsar) « garder, veiller avec soin, observer avec fidélité, conserver (la Loi) »xix

שָׁמַר(chamar) »garder, surveiller, protéger ».xx

Ces cinq racines représentent une espèce de spectrographie de la gamme des sortes de conscience que le génie hébraïque porte en lui, et qui peuvent se caractériser selon les thèmes suivants:

S’ÉVEILLER – DORMIR (La conscience dort ou s’éveille).

VOIR – ESPÉRER (La conscience voit, ou bien elle pressent, et si elle ne voit pas, elle espère).

VEILLER – PRÉVENIR (La conscience veille toujours, et elle peut de ce fait annoncer l’avenir au bénéfice de ce qui en elle dort encore).

GARDER – CONSERVER (La conscience conserve la mémoire. On peut ajouter qu’elle « crée » aussi le présent, car « conserver » = « créer » selon la 3ème Méditation métaphysique de Descartesxxi).

SURVEILLER – PROTÉGER (La conscience garde du mal et elle protège).

Philosophiquement, on en déduit ces caractérisations:

La conscience est une figure de la naissance et de la mort.

La conscience est intuition — de la réalité, ou des possibles.

La conscience (prémonitoire) relie l’avenir au présent.

La conscience (inductrice) noue mémoire et création.

La conscience protège l’homme du monde et de lui-même.

Sans la conscience, donc:

Pas de différence entre la vie et la mort; entre la réalité et le possible.

Pas de liens entre l’avenir et le présent; entre la mémoire et l’invention.

Pas de séparation entre l’homme et le monde, l’homme et le mal.

Autrement dit: l’inconscient relie la vie et la mort; la réalité et le possible; il sépare l’avenir du présent; et la création de la mémoire. Il assimile l’homme au monde et au mal.

Plus profondément encore, on voit que dans la conscience, comme dans l’inconscient, il y a à la fois une forme de séparation entre ce qui relève de la ‘séparation’ et ce qui ressort du ‘lien’, et une forme de continuité entre ce qui relève de la ‘séparation’ et ce qui ressort de la ‘continuité’.

Ceci peut être subsumé par l’idée d’intrication, non pas quantique, mais métaphysique.

Autrement dit:

Toute forme de conscience possède une part d’inconscient, et réciproquement.

Ceci s’applique aussi à la conscience divine, et à l’inconscient cosmique.

______________________

iCt 5,2 :אֲנִי יְשֵׁנָה, וְלִבִּי עֵר

ii On relève dans le Sander-Trenel les acceptions suivantes: a) Le cœur comme incarnant la vie elle-même. « Vos cœurs vivront dans l’éternité » (Ps. 22,27). b)Le cœur comme siège des sens et des passions (joie, tristesse, confiance, mépris, amertume, colère, dureté), et surtout de l’amour. « (Aime Dieu) de tout ton cœur. » (…be-kal levev-ḥa, Dt 6,5). c) Le cœur comme siège des sentiments moraux. Un cœur ‘pur’, ‘fidèle’, ‘droit’, ‘simple’, ‘profond’, ‘impénétrable’, ‘fier’, ou au ‘contraire’, ‘pervers’, ‘corrompu’, ‘hypocrite’, ‘double’. d) Le cœur comme siège de la volonté et du jugement.

iiiDamascius dit que selon Platon « l’Un s’il est, n’est même pas un; et s’il n’est pas, aucun discours ne lui conviendra, de sorte que de lui il n’y a même aucune négation (apophasis), ni aucun nom, de sorte que l’Un est incomplètement inconnaissable (agnostôn) et indicible (arrêton) ». Damascius Pr. t.1, p.9, 3-8 . Cf. Platon, Parménide 141 e 10-12 , 142 a

ivDe tout ceci on pourrait aussi tirer l’idée que Dieu est un infini en puissance, non un infini en acte (comme le pensait Descartes). Si Dieu était un infini en acte, alors il n’y aurait aucune place en Lui pour du fini (ou du non-infini) ou encore pour de l’être en puissance, puisque tout en Lui serait infini et en acte. La kénose consisterait alors pour Dieu à se vider de son actualité infinie, pour laisser en dehors de Lui une possibilité d’existence à des créatures finies, toujours en puissance de se transformer.

vPlaton, Parménide 141 e 10-12 , 142 a

vi« I am Seeing, pure and by nature changeless. There is by nature no object for me. Beeing the Infinite, completely filled in front, across, up, down, and in every direction, I am unborn, abiding in Myself. » Śaṅkara. A Thousand Teachings,traduit du sanskrit en anglais par Sengaku Mayeda. University of Tokyo Press, 1979. I, ch. 10, « Seeing », p.123 §2

viiLe commentaire de Śaṅkara explique ce terme de cette façon: « The ātman in the waking state is called vaiśvānara (Upad I, 17,65), that in the dreaming state taijasa (Upad I,15,24), and that in the state of deep sleep prājña(Upad I, 15,25).These three kinds of ātman are not the true Ātman. The true Ātman transcends all these three, and It is called Turīya (Upad I, 10,4). »

viii« Whether in the state of deep sleep or of waking or of dreaming, no delusive perception appears to pertain to Me in this world. As those [three states] have no existence, self-dependent or other-dependent, I am always the Fourth, the Seeing and the non-dual. » Ibid.§4

ixIl est Vaiśvānara « car il mène diversement tous les êtres (viśnara) à leur bonheur » (MaUB 3)

xMāṇḍūkya- Upaniṣad. 2-7. Trad. du sanskrit par Alyette Degrâces. Les Upaniṣad, Ed. Fayard, 2014, p. 506-508

xi L. Renou. »Sur la notion de Brahman ». in L’Inde fondamentale, 1978, p.86

xiiŚaṅkara. A Thousand Teachings,traduit du sanskrit en anglais par Sengaku Mayeda. University of Tokyo Press, 1979. I, ch. 18, §97, p.182

xiiiŚaṅkara. A Thousand Teachings,traduit du sanskrit en anglais par Sengaku Mayeda. University of Tokyo Press, 1979. Introduction, p.45.

xiv« En vérité, cet Homme, le Puruṣa, a deux états: ce monde-ci et l’autre monde. L’état de rêve, un troisième, en est la jonction. Se tenant dans cet état de jonction, il voit les deux états, ce monde-ci et l’autre monde. Et quelle que soit l’approche par laquelle il advient dans l’autre monde, par cette approche il est entré et il voit l’un et l’autre, les maux et les joies. Quand il rêve, il reprend le matériel de ce monde en son entier, il le détruit par lui-même, il le crée par lui-même. Il rêve par son propre rayonnement, par sa propre lumière. En ce lieu, l’Homme devient sa propre lumière. » Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad 4,3,9 (Trad. du sanskrit par Alette Degrâces)

xvBṛhadāraṇyaka Upaniṣad 4,3,23. Trad. du sanskrit par Alette Degrâces, in op.cit. p.288

xviŚaṅkara. A Thousand Teachings,traduit du sanskrit en anglais par Sengaku Mayeda. University of Tokyo Press, 1979. I, ch. 18, §98, p.182. J’ai employé ici le mot « Éveil » pour traduire le mot anglais « Awareness » employé par S. Mayeda.

xvii« Les yeux sur les nations, il veille » Ps 66,7

xviii« Voici, je vais veiller sur eux pour leur malheur » Jr 44,27

« Alors le Seigneur a veillé sur ces malheurs » Bar 2,9

« Je répondis, je vois une branche de veilleur » Jr 1,11

« YHVH a veillé à la calamité, il l’a fait venir sur nous » וַיִּשְׁקֹד יְהוָה עַל-הָרָעָה Dan 9,14

« je veille et je suis comme un oiseau seul sur un toit » Ps 102,8

« le gardien veille en vain » Ps 127,1

« je veille contre eux (pour leur faire du mal) » Jr 44,27

 » tous ceux qui veillent pour commettre l’iniquité » Is 29,20

« Tu as bien vu que je veille sur ma parole pour l’accomplir » Jr 1,12

 שָׁקֵד signifie aussi « amandier » (un arbre qui fleurit tôt dans l’année et donc veille à la venue du printemps)

xix « Plus que toute chose veille sur ton cœur » Pr 4,23

« toi qui veilles sur les hommes (notzer ha-adamah) » Job 7,20

« Veille sur ton âme (v-notzer nafchekh) » Pr 24,12

xx« Garde avec soin ton âme (vou-chmor nafchekh méor) » Dt 4,9

« Prenez garde à vos âmes (tichamrou b-nafchoutéikhem) » Jr 17,21

« Veilleur où en est la nuit? veilleur où en est la nuit?

 שֹׁמֵר מַה-מִּלַּיְלָה chomer ma mi-laïlah ? שֹׁמֵר מַה-מִּלֵּיל chomer ma mi-leïl? » Is 21,11

« Tu veillais avec sollicitude sur mon souffle, ( שָׁמְרָה רוּחִי, chamrah rouḥi) » Job 10,12

« Ces jours où Dieu veillait sur moi, (אֱלוֹהַּ יִשְׁמְרֵנִי , Eloha yichmréni)« Job 29,2

xxi« Car tout le temps de ma vie peut être divisé en une infinité de parties, chacune desquelles ne dépend en aucune façon des autres; et ainsi, de ce qu’un peu auparavant j’ai été, il ne s’ensuit pas que je doive maintenant être, si ce n’est qu’en ce moment quelque cause me produise et me crée, pour ainsi dire, derechef, c’est-à-dire me conserve. » Descartes. Méditations métaphysiques. 3ème Méditation. GF Flammarion, 2009, p.134-135

The Ambiguous Ishmael


– Ishmael and Hagar –

The important differences of interpretation of Ishmael’s role in the transmission of the Abrahamic inheritance, according to Judaism and Islam, focused in particular on the question of the identity of the son of Abraham who was taken to the sacrifice on Mount Moriah. For the Jews, it is unquestionably Isaac, as Genesis indicates. Muslims claim that it was Ishmael. However, the Koran does not name the son chosen for the sacrifice. In fact, Sura 36 indirectly suggests that this son was Isaac, contrary to later reinterpretations of later Islamic traditions.

It may be that, contrary to the historical importance of this controversy, this is not really an essential question, since Ishmael appears as a sort of inverted double of Isaac, and the linked destinies of these two half-brothers seem to compose (together) an allegorical and even anagogical figure – that of the ‘Sacrificed’, a figure of man ‘sacrificed’ in the service of a divine project that is entirely beyond him.

The conflict between the divine project and human views appears immediately when one compares the relatively banal and natural circumstances of the conception of Abram’s child (resulting from his desire to ensure his descent ii, a desire favored by his wife Sarai), with the particularly improbable and exceptional circumstances of the conception of the child of Abraham and Sarah.

One can then sense the tragic nature of the destiny of Ishmael, the first-born (and beloved) son of Abraham, but whose ‘legitimacy’ cannot be compared to that of his half-brother, born thirteen years later. But in what way is it Ishmael’s ‘fault’ that he was not ‘chosen’ as the son of Abraham to embody the Covenant? Was he ‘chosen’ only to embody the arbitrary dispossession of a mysterious ‘filiation’, of a nature other than genetic, in order to signify to the multitudes of generations to come a certain aspect of the divine mystery?

This leads us to reflect on the respective roles of the two mothers (Hagar and Sarah) in the correlated destiny of Ishmael and Isaac, and invites us to deepen the analysis of the personalities of the two mothers in order to get a better idea of those of the two sons.

The figure of Ishmael is both tragic and ambiguous. I will attempt here to trace its contours by citing a few ‘features’ both for and against, by seeking to raise a part of the mystery, and to penetrate the ambiguity of the paradigm of election, which can mean that « the election of some implies the setting aside of others », or on the contrary, that « election is not a rejection of the other ».iii

Elements Against Ishmael :

a) Ishmael, a young man, « plays » with Isaac, a barely weaned child, provoking the wrath of Sarah. This key scene is reported in Genesis 21:9: « Sarah saw the son of Hagar mocked him (Isaac). » The Hebrew word מְצַחֵק lends itself to several interpretations. It comes from the root צָחַק, in the verbal form Piel. The meanings of the verb seem at first glance relatively insignificant:

Qal :To laugh, rto ejoice. As in : Gen 18,12 « Sara laughs (secretly) ». Gen 21:6 « Whoever hears of it will rejoice with me.

Piël : To play, to joke, to laugh. As in Gen 19:14 « But it seemed that he was joking, that he said it in jest. » Ex 32:6 « They stood up to play, or to dance ». Judge 16:25 « That he might play, or sing, before them ». Gen 26:8 « Isaac played or joked with his wife. Gen 39:14 « To play with us, to insult us ».

However, Rashi’s meanings of the word in the context of Gen 21:9 are much more serious: ‘idolatry’, ‘immorality’, and even ‘murder’. « Ridicule: this is idolatry. Thus, ‘they rose up to have fun’ (Ex 32:6). Another explanation: This is immorality. Thus ‘for my own amusement’ (Gen 39:17). Another explanation: this is murder. So ‘let these young men stand up and enjoy themselves before us’ (2 Sam 2:14). Ishmael was arguing with Isaac about the inheritance. I am the elder, he said, and I will take double share. They went out into the field and Ishmael took his bow and shot arrows at him. Just as in: he who plays the foolish game of brandons and arrows, and says: but I am having fun! (Prov 26:18-19).»

Rashi’s judgment is extremely derogatory and accusatory. The accusation of ‘immorality’ is a veiled euphemism for ‘pedophilia’ (Isaac is a young child). And all this derived from a special interpretation of the single word tsaḥaq, – the very word that gave Isaac his name… Yet this word comes up strangely often in the context that interests us. Four important biblical characters ‘laugh’ (from the verb tsaḥaq), in Genesis: Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Ishmael – except Hagar, who never laughs, but cries. Abraham laughs (or smiles) at the news that he is going to be a father, Sarah laughs inwardly, mocking her old husband, Isaac laughs while wrestling and caressing his wife Rebecca (vi), but only Ishmael, who also laughs while playing, is seriously accused by Rashi of the nature of this laughter, and of this ‘game’.

b) According to the commentators (Berechit Rabbah), Ishmael boasted to Isaac that he had the courage to voluntarily accept circumcision at the age of thirteen, whereas Isaac underwent it passively at the age of eight days.

c) Genesis states that Ishmael is a ‘primrose’, a misanthropic loner, an ‘archer’ who ‘lives in the wilderness’ and who ‘lays his hand on all’.

d) In Gen 17:20 it says that Ishmael « will beget twelve princes. « But Rashi, on this point, asserts that Ishmael in fact only begat ‘clouds’, relying on the Midrash which interprets the word נְשִׂיאִים (nessi’im) as meaning ‘clouds’ and ‘wind’. The word nessi’im can indeed mean either ‘princes’ or ‘clouds’, according to the dictionary (vii). But Rashi, for his own reason, chooses the pejorative meaning, whereas it is God Himself who pronounces this word after having blessed Ishmael.

Elements in Favor of Ishmael:

a) Ishmael suffers several times the effects of Sarah’s hatred and the consequences of Abraham’s injustice (or cowardice), who does not defend him, passively obeys Sarah and remorselessly favors his younger son. This has not escaped the attention of some commentators. Ramban (the Nahmanides) said about sending Hagar and Ishmael back to the desert: « Our mother Sarai was guilty of doing so and Abram of having tolerated it ». On the other hand, Rashi says nothing about this sensitive subject.

Yet Abraham loves and cares for his son Ishmael, but probably not enough to resist the pressures, preferring the younger, in deeds. You don’t need to be a psychoanalyst to guess the deep psychological problems Ishmael is experiencing about not being the ‘preferred’, the ‘chosen’ (by God) to take on the inheritance and the Covenant, – although he is nevertheless ‘loved’ by his father Abraham, – just as Esau, Isaac’s eldest son and beloved, was later robbed of his inheritance (and blessing) by Jacob, because of his mother Rebekah, and despite Isaac’s clearly expressed will.

(b) Ishmael is the son of « an Egyptian handmaid » (Genesis 16:1), but in reality she, Hagar, according to Rashi, is the daughter of the Pharaoh: « Hagar was the daughter of the Pharaoh. When he saw the miracles of which Sarai was the object, he said: Better for my daughter to be the servant in such a house than the mistress in another house. » (Commentary of Genesis 16:1 by Rashi)

One can undoubtedly understand the frustrations of a young man, first-born of Abraham and grandson of the Pharaoh, in front of the bullying inflicted by Sarah.

c) Moreover, Ishmael is subjected throughout his childhood and adolescence to a form of disdain that is truly undeserved. Indeed, Hagar was legally married, by the will of Sarah, and by the desire of Abraham to leave his fortune to an heir of his flesh, and this after the legal deadline of ten years of observation of Sarah’s sterility had elapsed. Ishmael is therefore legally and legitimately the first-born son of Abraham, and of his second wife. But he does not have the actual status, as Sarah jealously watches over him.

d) Ishmael is thrown out twice in the desert, once when his mother is pregnant with him (in theory), and another time when he is seventeen years old (being 13 years old at the time of Isaac’s birth + 4 years corresponding to Isaac’s weaning). In both cases, his mother Hagar had proven encounters with angels, which testifies to a very high spiritual status, which she did not fail to give to her son. Examples of women in the Hebrew Bible having had a divine vision are extremely rare. To my knowledge, in fact, there are none, except for Hagar, who had divine visions on several occasions. Rashi notes of Gen 16:13: « She [Hagar] expresses surprise. Could I have thought that even here in the desert I would see God’s messengers after seeing them in the house of Abraham where I was accustomed to seeing them? The proof that she was accustomed to seeing angels is that Manoë when he first saw the angel said, « Surely we will die » (Jug 13:27). Hagar saw angels four times and was not the least bit afraid. »

But to this, we can add that Hagar is even more remarkable because she is the only person in all the Scriptures who stands out for having given not only one but two new names to God: אֵל רֳאִי , El Ro’ï, « God of Vision »viii , and חַי רֹאִי , Ḥaï Ro’ï, the « Living One of Vision »(ix). She also gave a name to the nearby well, the well of the « Living One of My Vision »: בְּאֵר לַחַי רֹאִי , B’ér la-Ḥaï Ro’ï. x

It is also near this well that Isaac will come to settle, after Abraham’s death, – and especially after God has finally blessed him, which Abraham had always refused to do (xii). One can imagine that Isaac had then, at last, understood the depth of the events which had taken place in this place, and with which he had, in spite of himself, been associated.

In stark contrast to Hagar, Sarah also had a divine vision, albeit a very brief one, when she participated in a conversation between Abraham and God. But God ignored Sarah, addressing Abraham directly, asking him for an explanation of Sarah’s behavior, rather than addressing her (xiii). She intervened in an attempt to justify her behavior because « she was afraid, » but God rebuked her curtly: « No, you laughed.

Making her case worse, she herself later reproached Ishmael for having laughed too, and drove him out for that reason.

e) Ishmael, after these events, remained in the presence of God. According to Genesis 21:20, « God was with this child, and he grew up (…) and became an archer. « Curiously, Rashi does not comment on the fact that « God was with this child. On the other hand, about « he became an archer », Rashi notes proudly: « He was a robber… ».

f) In the desire to see Ishmael die, Sarah twice casts spells on him (the ‘evil eye’), according to Rashi. The first time, to make the child carried by Hagar die, and to provoke his abortionxv, and the second time to make him sick, even though he was hunted with his mother in the desert, thus forcing him to drink much and to consume quickly the meager water resources.

g) At the time of his circumcision, Ishmael is thirteen years old and he obeys Abraham without difficulty (whereas he could have refused, according to Rashi, the latter counts to his advantage). Abram was eighty-six years old when Hagar gave birth to Ishmael (Gen 16:16). Rashi comments: « This is written in praise of Ishmael. Ishmael will therefore be thirteen years old when he is circumcised, and he will not object. »

h) Ishmael is blessed by God during Abraham’s lifetime, whereas Isaac is blessed by God only after Abraham’s death (who refused to bless him, knowing that he was to beget Esau, according to Rashi).xvi

i) Ishmael, in spite of all the liabilities of his tormented life, was reconciled with Isaac, before the latter married Rebekah. Indeed, when his fiancée Rebekah arrives, Isaac has just returned from a visitexvii to the Well of the Living of My Vision, near which Hagar and Ishmael lived.

Moreover, his father Abraham ended up « regularizing the situation » with his mother Hagar, since he married her after Sarah’s death. Indeed, according to Rashi, « Qeturah is Hagar. Thus, for the second time, Ishmael is « legitimized », which makes it all the more remarkable that he gives precedence to his younger brother at Abraham’s funeral.

(j) Ishmael lets Isaac take the precellence at the burial of their father Abraham, as we know from Gen 25:9: « [Abraham] was buried by Isaac and Ishmael, his sons. « The preferential order of the names testifies to this.

k) The verse Gen 25:17 gives a final positive indication about Ishmael: « The number of years of Ishmael’s life was one hundred thirty-seven years. He expired and died. « Rashi comments on the expression « he expired » in this highly significant way: « This term is used only in connection with the righteous. »

Let’s now conclude.

On the one hand, Islam, which claims to be a ‘purer’, more ‘native’ religion, and in which the figure of Abraham represents a paradigm, that of the ‘Muslim’ entirely ‘submitted’ to the will of God, – recognizes in Isaac and Ishmael two ‘prophets’.

On the other hand, Ishmael is certainly not recognized as a ‘prophet’ in Israel.

These two characters, intimately linked by their destiny (sons of the same father, and what a father!, but not of the same mother), are also, curiously, figures of the ‘sacrifice’, although in different ways, and which need to be interpreted.

The sacrifice of Isaac on Mount Moriah ended with the intervention of an angel, just as the imminent death of Ishmael in the desert near a hidden spring ended after the intervention of an angel.

It seems to me that a revision of the trial once held against Ishmael, at the instigation of Sarah, and sanctioned by his undeserved rejection outside the camp of Abraham, and the case againt Ishmael should be re-opened.

It seems indispensable, and not unrelated to the present state of the world, to repair the injustice that was once done to Ishmael.

_______________

i Qur’an 36:101-113: « So we gave him the good news of a lonely boy. Then when he was old enough to go with him, [Abraham] said, « O my son, I see myself in a dream, immolating you. See what you think of it. He said, « O my dear father, do as you are commanded: you will find me, if it pleases God, among those who endure. And when they both came together and he threw him on his forehead, behold, We called him « Abraham »! You have confirmed the vision. This is how We reward those who do good. Verily that was the manifest trial. And We ransomed him with a bountiful sacrifice. And We perpetuated his name in posterity: « Peace be upon Abraham. Thus do We reward those who do good, for he was of Our believing servants. And We gave him the good news of Isaac as a prophet of the righteous among the righteous. And We blessed him and Isaac. »

This account seems to indicate indirectly that the (unnamed) son who was taken to the place of the sacrifice is, in fact, Isaac, since Isaac’s name is mentioned twice, in verses 112 and 113, immediately after verses 101-106, which describe the scene of the sacrifice, – whereas the name Ishmael, on the other hand, is not mentioned at all on this occasion. Moreover, God seems to want to reward Isaac for his attitude of faith by announcing on this same occasion his future role as a prophet, which the Qur’an never does about Ishmael.

ii Gen 15, 2-4. Let us note that the divine promise immediately instils a certain ambiguity: « But behold, the word of the Lord came to him, saying, ‘This man shall not inherit you, but he who comes out of your loins shall be your heir. If Eliezer [« this one, » to whom the verse refers] is clearly excluded from the inheritance, the word of God does not decide a priori between the children to come, Ishmael and Isaac.

iiiCourse of Moïse Mouton. 7 December 2019

ivTranslation of the French Rabbinate, adapted to Rachi’s commentary. Fondation S. et O. Lévy. Paris, 1988

« v » Hagar raised her voice, and she cried. (Gen 21:16)

viGn 26.8. Rachi comments: « Isaac says to himself, ‘Now I don’t have to worry anymore because nothing has been done to him so far. And he was no longer on guard. Abimelec looked – he saw them together. »

viiHebrew-French Dictionary by Sander and Trenel, Paris 1859

viiiGn 16.13

ixGn 16, 14: Rachi notes that « the word Ro’ï is punctuated Qamets qaton, because it is a noun. He is the God of vision. He sees the humiliation of the humiliated. »

xGn 16, 14

xi Gn 25.11

xiiiGn 18.13

xivGn 18.15

xvRachi comments on Gen 16:5 as follows: « Sarai looked upon Agar’s pregnancy with a bad eye and she had an abortion. That is why the angel said to Hagar, « You are about to conceive » (Gen 16:11). Now she was already pregnant and the angel tells her that she will be pregnant. This proves that the first pregnancy was not successful. »

xviRachi explains that « Abraham was afraid to bless Isaac because he saw that his son would give birth to Esau. »

xviiGn 24, 62

The Divine Wager


— Carl Gustav Jung —

Some Upaniṣad explain that the ultimate goal of the Veda, of its hymns, songs and formulas, is metaphysical knowledge.

What does this knowledge consist of?

Some wise men have said that such knowledge may fit in just one sentence.

Others indicate that it touches on the nature of the world and the nature of the Self.

They state, for example, that « the world is a triad consisting of name, form and action »i, and they add, without contradiction, that it is also « one », and that this One is the Self. Who is the Self, then? It is like the world, in appearance, but above all it possesses immortality. « The Self is one and it is this triad. And it is the Immortal, hidden by reality. In truth the Immortal is breath ; reality is name and form. This breath is here hidden by both of them. » ii

Why do we read ‘both of them’ here, if the world is a ‘triad’?

In the triad of the world, what ‘hides’ is above all the ‘name’ and the ‘form’. Action can hide, in the world, but it can also reveal.

Thus the One ‘acts’, as the sun acts. The divine breath also acts, without word or form. The weight of words differs according to the context…

We will ask again: why this opposition between, on the one hand, ‘name, form, action’, and on the other hand ‘breath’? Why reality on the one hand, and the Immortal on the other? Why this cut, if everything is one? Why is the reality of the world so unreal, so obviously fleeting, so little immortal, and so separated from the One?

Perhaps reality participates in some way in the One, in a way that is difficult to conceive, and therefore participates in the Immortal.

Reality is apparently separated from the One, but it is also said to ‘hide’ It, to ‘cover’ It with the veil of its ‘reality’ and ‘appearance’. It is separated from It, but in another way, it is in contact with It, as a hiding place contains what it hides, as a garment covers a nakedness, as an illusion covers an ignorance, as existence veils the essence.

Hence another question. Why is it all arranged this way? Why these grandiose entities, the Self, the World, Man? And why these separations between the Self, the World and Man, metaphysically disjointed, separated? What rhymes the World and Man, in an adventure that goes beyond them entirely?

What is the purpose of this metaphysical arrangement?

A possible lead opens up with C.G. Jung, who identifies the Self, the Unconscious, – and God.

« As far as the Self is concerned, I could say that it is an equivalent of God ».iiiiv

The crucial idea is that God needs man’s conscience. This is the reason for man’s creation. Jung postulates « the existence of a [supreme] being who is essentially unconscious. Such a model would explain why God created a man with consciousness and why He seeks His purpose in him. On this point the Old Testament, the New Testament and Buddhism agree. Master Eckhart says that ‘God is not happy in His divinity. So He gives birth to Himself in man. This is what happened with Job: the creator sees himself through the eyes of human consciousnessv

What does it (metaphysically) imply that the Self does not have a full awareness of itself, and even that It is much more unconscious than conscious? How can this be explained? The Self is so infinite that It can absolutely not have a full, absolute consciousness of Itself. Consciousness is an attention to oneself, a focus on oneself. It would be contrary to the very idea of consciousness to be ‘conscious’ of infinitely everything, of everything at once, for all the infinitely future times and the infinitely past times.

An integral omniscience, an omni-conscience, is in intrinsic contradiction with the concept of infinity. For if the Self is infinite, it is infinite in act and potency. And yet consciousness is in act. It is the unconscious that is in potency. The conscious Self can realize the infinite in act, at any moment, and everywhere in the World, or in the heart of each man, but It cannot also put into act what unrealized potency still lies in the infinity of possibilities. It cannot be ‘in act’, for example, today, in hearts and minds of the countless generations yet to come, who are still ‘in potency’ to come into existence.

The idea that there is a very important part of the unconscious in the Self, and even a part of the infinite unconscious, is not heretical. Quite the contrary.

The Self does not have a total, absolute, consciousness of Itself, but only a consciousness of what in It is in act. It ‘needs’ to realize its part of the unconscious, which is in potency in It, and which is also in potency in the world, and in Man…

This is the role of reality, the role of the world and its triad ‘name, form, action’. Only ‘reality’ can ‘realize’ that the Self resides in it, and what the Self expects of it. It is this ‘realisation’ that contributes to the emergence of the part of the unconscious, the part of potency, that the Self contains, in germ; in Its infinite unconscious.

The Self has been walking on Its own, from all eternity, and for eternities to come (although this expression may seem odd, and apparently contradictory). In this unfinished ‘adventure’, the Self needs to get out of Its ‘present’, out of Its own ‘presence’ to Itself. It needs to ‘dream’. In short, the Self ‘dreams’ creation, the world and Man, in order to continue to make what is still in potency happen in act.

This is how the Self knows Itself, through the existence of that which is not the Self, but which participates in It. The Self thus learns more about Itself than if It remained alone, mortally alone. Its immortality and infinity come from there, from Its power of renewal, from an absolute renewal since it comes from what is not absolutely the Self, but from what is other to It (for instance the heart of Man).

The world and Man, all this is the dream of the God, that God whom the Veda calls Man, Puruṣa, or the Lord of creatures, Prajāpati, and whom Upaniṣads calls the Self, ātman.

Man is the dream of the God who dreams of what He does not yet know what He will be. This is not ignorance. It is only the open infinite of a future yet to happen.

He also gave His name: « I shall be who I shall be ». vi אֶהְיֶה אֲשֶׁר אֶהְיֶה, ehyeh acher ehyeh. If the God who revealed Himself to Moses in this way with a verb in an « imperfective aspect » ‘, it is because the Hebrew language allows one side of the veil to be lifted. God is not yet « perfective », as is the verb that names Him.

Pascal developed the idea of a ‘bet’ that man should make, to win infinity. I would like to suggest that another ‘bet’, this time divine, accompanies the human bet. It is the wager that God made in creating His creation, accepting that non-self coexists with Him, in the time of His dream.

What is the nature of the divine wager? It is the bet that Man, by names, by forms, and by actions, will come to help the divinity to accomplish the realization of the Self, yet to do, yet to create, the Self always in potency.

God dreams that Man will deliver Him from His absence (to Himself).

For this potency, which still sleeps, in a dreamless sleep, in the infinite darkness of His unconscious, is what the God dreams about.

In His own light, He knows no other night than His own.

iB.U. 1.6.1

iiB.U. 1.6.1

iiiC.G. Jung. Letter to Prof. Gebhard Frei.1 3 January 1948. The Divine in Man. Albin Michel.1999. p.191

ivC.G. Jung. Letter to Aniela Jaffé. September 3, 1943. The Divine in Man. Albin Michel.1999. p.185-186

vC.G. Jung. Letter to Rev. Morton Kelsey. .3 May 1958. The Divine in Man. Albin Michel.1999. p.133

viEx 3.14