Why did YHVH Attack Moses, Seeking to Kill him?


“The LORD met him, and sought to kill him. Then Zipporah took a flint, and cut off the foreskin of her son, and cast it at his feet; and she said: ‘Surely a bridegroom of blood art thou to me’. So He let him alone. Then she said: ‘A bridegroom of blood in regard of the circumcision’.”i

This text is off-putting, disjointed, enigmatic and raises many questions.

For example, is Zipporah addressing her son or her husband when she pronounces these words: « You are for me a bridegroom of blood »? Both interpretations are possible, and both have been defended by learned commentators.

According to some, Zipporah has just circumcised her son and she calls him « blood husband » because he is bleeding.

According to others, Moses neglected to circumcise his child, which is why God « attacked him » and « sought to kill him”. When Moses was close to death, Zipporah called him « blood husband, » because she had saved him with her son’s blood.

The first interpretation is preferred by the majority of commentators. But it poses a problem. One could ask whether Zipporah is operating a kind of symbolic incest. The mother calls her son twice: « blood husband » and « blood husband because of circumcision ». There would undoubtedly be there, for psychoanalysis, a form of symmetry with the true husband, Moses, who made Zipporah bleed « because of » her defloration.

Moses tore Zipporah’s hymen, as a husband of flesh. Zipporah cut off Eliezer’s foreskin, as a « husband of blood ». A symbolic parallel, heavy with analytical consequences, but also a saving act. Just after Zipporah cut off the foreskin, YHVH released Moses, and it is then that Zipporah clarified: « A husband of blood because of circumcision. »

But why would Zipporah feel the need to « touch » the feet of her son Eliezer with her foreskin?

The second interpretation is perhaps deeper. Zipporah saves her husband’s life by circumcising her son Eliezer in a hurry, while YHVH (or his angel) is about to kill Moses. Then she touches « his feet » with her foreskin. Whose feet? In the second interpretation, they are the « feet » of Moses, and it is to him that she addresses herself. But why the “feet”? Why touch the feet of Moses with his son’s foreskin?

In biblical Hebrew, “feet” are a metaphor often used to signify sex, as in Isaiah 7:20: « He shall shave the head and the hair of the feet ». Zipporah touched the sex of Moses with his son’s foreskin and said to him: « You are a blood husband to me », because it was also his blood that flowed, with the blood of his son. Circumcision is the figure of a new marriage, not with the son (which would be incest), but with Moses, and this in a symbolic sense, the sense of the Covenant, which is physically concluded in the blood of both spouses, as they are united by the blood of Eliezer.

In other words, Zipporah saved the life of Moses (who was uncircumcised) by simulating his circumcision. She touches the sex of Moses with the foreskin of her son, who has just been circumcised, and thus appeases the divine wrath, which was twofold: because the father and the son had not yet been circumcised.

At that very moment, YHVH « let him [Moses] alone ». This translation does not render the richness of the original Hebrew word. The verb used, rafah, has as its first meaning « to heal »; in a second sense, it means « to decline, to weaken, to desist, to release ». Healing is a weakening of the disease. It is worth noting this double meaning. YHVH « releases » Moses, « desists » from him, and thus He « heals » him. He « heals » Moses of his capital fault, and he also « heals » the child who is bleeding, and who might have died as a result of the operation, carried out with a stone in the middle of the desert, without much hygiene, and in an emergency.

There is yet another angle to this story.

Rachi comments: « He deserved to die because of this negligence. A Baraïta teaches us: Rabbi Yosef said: God forbid, Moses was not guilty of negligence. But he thought, « Shall I circumcise the child and set off? Will the child be in danger for three days? Shall I circumcise the child and wait three days? Yet the Holy One Blessed be He, who commanded me: Go, return to Egypt. Why then should he deserve death? Because he had first taken care of his bed at the stage instead of circumcising him without delay. The Talmud in the Nedarim Treaty (32a) says that the angel took the form of a snake, and swallowed him starting from the head to the hips, then rejected him and swallowed him again starting from the feet to the place in question. That’s how Zipporah understood that it was because of the circumcision. »

Rashi presents Moses in the throes of procrastination. Which of God’s commandments should be obeyed first: that of returning to Egypt, or that of circumcising his son? He falls into the fault when he does not immediately take care of the circumcision. But the Nedarim Treaty goes further. It evokes Moses swallowed by a snake. The snake starts at the head and stops at the hips (at the sex), then spits him out and starts again by swallowing him, starting by the feet.

Let’s try our own interpretation.

One can speculate that this « snake » metaphorically represents disease. Moses, uncircumcised, may have been the victim of a genital infection, which resulted in high fevers, with pain extending to the sex. Then, after a remission, the infection would start again from the « feet » (the sex). The kind of fellatio performed by the « snake » is a rather crude metaphor, but « biblical » after all. In any case, the Talmudists thought about it allusively, and felt that this was how Zipporah understood what she had to do.

But if Moses had a genital infection, why did Zipporah operate on her son’s sex rather than on Moses’?

As an unrepentant rationalist, I shall attempt a medical explanation.

Zipporah touched her husband’s sex with her son’s bloody foreskin. The son’s blood contained antibodies, which cured Moses’ genital infection.

Quite a rational solution. Yet it was a (rather irrational) angel who suggested it to Zipporah…

iEx. 4, 24-26

Yahvé attaqua Moïse et chercha à le tuer


Yahvé attaqua Moïse et chercha à le tuer. Et Sippora prit un caillou et elle coupa le prépuce de son fils et elle toucha ses pieds et elle dit « Tu es pour moi un époux de sang ». Alors il le relâcha. Elle dit alors : « Époux de sang à cause de la circoncision. »i

Ce texte heurté, décousu, énigmatique, suscite les questions.

Par exemple, Sippora s’adresse-t-elle à son fils ou à son mari lorsqu’elle prononce ces paroles : « Tu es pour moi un époux de sang » ? Les deux interprétations sont possibles, et elles ont été défendues par de savants commentateurs.

D’après les uns, Sippora vient de circoncire son fils et elle l’appelle : « époux de sang », parce qu’il saigne.

Selon d’autres, Moïse avait négligé de circoncire son enfant, raison pour laquelle Dieu « l’attaqua » et « chercha à le tuer ». Moïse étant près de mourir, Sippora l’appela « époux de sang », parce qu’elle l’avait sauvé avec le sang de son fils.

La première interprétation a la préférence de la majorité des commentateurs. Mais elle pose problème. On pourrait demander si Sippora opère une sorte d’inceste symbolique. La mère appelle deux fois son fils : « époux de sang » et « époux de sang à cause de la circoncision ». Il y aurait sans doute là, pour la psychanalyse, une forme de symétrie avec le véritable époux, Moïse, qui a fait saigner Sippora « à cause » de sa défloration.

Moïse a déchiré l’hymen de Sippora, comme époux de chair. Sippora a coupé le prépuce d’Eliézer, comme « époux de sang ». Parallèle symbolique, lourd de conséquences analytiques, mais aussi acte salvateur. Juste après que Sippora a coupé le prépuce, Yahvé relâche Moïse, et c’est alors que Sippora précise: « Un époux de sang à cause de la circoncision. »

Mais pourquoi Sippora éprouverait-elle le besoin de « toucher » les pieds de son fils Eliézer avec son prépuce ?

La deuxième interprétation est peut-être plus profonde. Sippora sauve la vie de son mari en circoncisant son fils Eliézer dans l’urgence, alors que Yahvé (ou son ange) s’apprête à tuer Moïse. Puis elle touche « ses pieds » avec le prépuce. Les pieds de qui ? Dans la seconde interprétation, ce sont les « pieds » de Moïse, et c’est à lui qu’elle s’adresse. Mais pourquoi les pieds ? Pourquoi toucher les pieds de Moïse avec le prépuce de son fils ?

Les pieds sont, dans l’hébreu biblique, une métaphore souvent utilisée pour signifier le sexe, comme dans Is. 7, 20 : « Il rasera la tête et le poil des pieds ». Sippora touche le sexe de Moïse avec le prépuce de son fils et lui dit : « Tu es pour moi un époux de sang », parce que c’est aussi son sang qui a coulé, avec le sang de son fils. La circoncision est la figure de nouvelles épousailles, non avec le fils (ce qui serait un inceste), mais bien avec Moïse, et ceci dans un sens symbolique, le sens de l’Alliance, qui se conclut physiquement dans le sang des deux époux, en tant qu’ils sont unis par le sang d’Eliézer.

Autrement dit, Sippora sauve la vie de Moïse (qui était incirconcis) en simulant sa circoncision. Elle touche le sexe de Moïse avec le prépuce de son fils, qui vient d’être circoncis, et apaise ainsi la colère divine, qui était double : du fait de l’incirconcision du père et du fils.

A ce moment précis, Yahvé « relâche » Moïse. Cette traduction ne rend pas la richesse de l’hébreu. Le verbe utilisé, rafah, a pour premier sens « guérir » ; dans une acception seconde, il signifie « décliner, s’affaiblir, se désister, relâcher ». La guérison est un affaiblissement de la maladie. Il vaut la peine de noter ce double sens. Yahvé « relâche » Moïse, « se désiste » de lui, et ainsi il le « guérit ». Il « guérit » Moïse de sa faute capitale, et il « guérit » aussi l’enfant qui saigne, et qui serait peut-être mort des suites de l’opération, réalisée avec un caillou en plein désert, sans trop d’hygiène, et dans l’urgence.

Il y a un autre angle encore dans cette histoire.

Rachi commente: « C’est pour s’être laissé à cette négligence qu’il méritait la mort. Une Baraïta nous apprend : Rabbi Yossé a dit : Dieu garde, Moïse ne s’est pas rendu coupable de négligence. Mais il s’était dit : Vais-je circoncire l’enfant et me mettre en route ? L’enfant sera en danger pendant trois jours ? Vais-je circoncire l’enfant et attendre trois jours ? Le Saint Béni soit-Il m’a pourtant ainsi ordonné : Va, retourne en Égypte. Pourquoi alors mériterait-il la mort ? Parce qu’il s’était occupé d’abord de son gîte à l’étape au lieu de procéder sans retard à la circoncision. Le Talmud, au Traité Nedarim (32a) dit que l’ange avait pris la forme d’un serpent, qu’il l’avalait en commençant par la tête jusqu’au hanches, puis le rejetait pour l’avaler à nouveau en commençant par les pieds jusqu’à l’endroit en question. C’est ainsi que Sippora a compris que c’était à cause de la circoncision. »

Rachi présente Moïse plongé dans les affres de la tergiversation. A quel commandement de Dieu faut-il obéir d’abord : celui de retourner en Égypte, ou celui de circoncire son fils ? Il tombe dans la faute lorsqu’à l’étape il ne s’occupe pas immédiatement de la circoncision. Mais le Traité Nedarim va plus loin. Il évoque Moïse avalé par un serpent. Le serpent commence par la tête et s’arrête aux hanches (au sexe), le recrache alors puis recommence en l’avalant par les pieds.

On peut conjecturer que ce « serpent » représente métaphoriquement la maladie. Moïse, incirconcis, a pu être victime d’une infection génitale, qui se traduisait par de fortes fièvres, les douleurs s’étendant jusqu’au sexe. Puis, après une rémission, l’infection reprenait à partir des « pieds » (du sexe). L’espèce de fellation effectuée par le « serpent » est une métaphore assez crue, « biblique » somme toute. En tout cas, les talmudistes y ont pensé allusivement, et ont estimé que c’était ainsi que Sippora comprit ce qu’il lui restait à faire.

Mais si Moïse était victime d’une infection due à son incirconcision, pourquoi Sippora a-t-elle opéré le sexe de son fils plutôt que celui de Moïse ?

En tant que rationaliste impénitent, on peut tenter une explication médicale.

Sippora toucha le sexe de son mari avec le prépuce sanglant de son fils. Le sang du fils contenait des anticorps, qui guérirent l’infection génitale de Moïse.

iEx. 4, 24-26

Moïse, le prépuce coupé et l’infection génitale


 

Iahvé attaqua Moïse et chercha à le tuer. Et Sippora prit un caillou et elle coupa le prépuce de son fils et elle toucha ses pieds et elle dit « Tu es pour moi un époux de sang ». Alors il le relâcha. Elle dit alors : « Époux de sang à cause de la circoncision. »i

Ce texte, brutal, énigmatique, ne permet pas de distinguer clairement si Sippora s’adresse à son fils ou à son mari lorsqu’elle prononce ces paroles : « Tu es pour moi un époux de sang ». Les deux interprétations sont possibles, quoique l’une soit plus naturelle que l’autre.

D’après les uns, c’est son fils qu’elle vient de circoncire, que Sippora appelle : « époux de sang », parce qu’il saigne, ou encore parce que Moïse a manqué de perdre la vie à cause de son enfant, qu’il avait négligé de circoncire, raison pour laquelle Dieu voulait le faire mourir. Selon d’autres, ces paroles de Sippora s’adresse en fait à Moïse.

La première interprétation a la préférence de la majorité des commentateurs. Mais elle pose problème. On pourrait en déduire que Sippora effectue ainsi une sorte d’inceste nominal ou symbolique. La mère appelle deux fois son fils : « époux de sang » et « époux de sang à cause la circoncision ». Il y aurait sans doute là, pour la psychanalyse, une forme de symétrie avec le véritable époux, Moïse, qui a fait saigné Sippora lors de sa défloration.

Moïse a déchiré l’hymen de Sippora, comme époux de chair. Sippora a coupé le prépuce de Eliézer, comme « époux de sang ». Symétrie symbolique, lourde de conséquences analytiques, mais aussi acte salvateur. Juste après que Sippora a coupé le prépuce, Yahvé relâche Moïse, et c’est alors que Sippora précise: « Un époux de sang à cause de la circoncision. »

Mais pourquoi Sippora éprouve-t-elle le besoin de « toucher » les pieds de son fils Eliézer avec son prépuce ?

La deuxième interprétation est peut-être plus profonde. Sippora sauve la vie de son mari en circoncisant son fils Eliézer dans l’urgence, alors que Yahvé (ou son ange) s’apprête à tuer Moïse. Puis elle touche « ses pieds » avec le prépuce. Les pieds de qui ? Dans la seconde interprétation, ce sont les « pieds » de Moïse, et c’est à lui qu’elle s’adresse. Mais pourquoi les pieds ? Pourquoi toucher les pieds de Moïse avec le prépuce de son fils ?

Les pieds sont, dans l’hébreu biblique, une métaphore souvent utilisée pour signifier le sexe, comme dans Is. 7, 20 : « Il rasera la tête et le poil des pieds [du sexe] ». Sippora touche le sexe de Moïse avec le prépuce de son fils et lui dit : « Tu es pour moi un époux de sang », parce que c’est aussi son sang qui a coulé, dans le sang de son fils, tout comme le sang de sa mère. La circoncision est la figure de nouvelles épousailles, non avec le fils (ce qui serait un inceste), mais bien avec Moïse, et ceci dans un sens symbolique, le sens de l’Alliance, qui se conclut physiquement dans le sang des deux époux, en tant qu’ils sont unis par le sang d’Eliézer.

Autrement dit, Sippora sauve la vie de Moïse (qui était incirconcis) en simulant sa circoncision. Elle touche le sexe de Moïse avec le prépuce de son fils, qui vient d’être circoncis, et apaise ainsi la colère divine, qui était double : du fait de l’incirconcision du père et du fils.

Alors Yahvé « relâche » Moïse. Cette traduction ne rend pas la richesse de l’hébreu. Le verbe utilisé rafah a pour premier sens « guérir » ; dans une acception seconde, il signifie « décliner, s’affaiblir, se désister, relâcher ». La guérison est un affaiblissement de la maladie. Il vaut la peine de noter ce double sens. Yahvé « relâche » Moïse, « se désiste » de lui, et ainsi il le « guérit ». Il « guérit » Moïse de sa faute capitale, et il « guérit » aussi l’enfant qui saigne, et qui serait peut-être mort des suites de l’opération, réalisée avec un caillou en plein désert, sans trop d’hygiène, et dans l’urgence.

Il y a un autre angle encore à cette histoire.

Rachi apporte de commentaire: « C’est pour s’être laissé à cette négligence qu’il méritait la mort. Une Baraïta nous apprend : Rabbi Yossé a dit : Dieu garde, Moïse ne s’est pas rendu coupable de négligence. Mais il s’était dit : Vais-je circoncire l’enfant et me mettre en route ? L’enfant sera en danger pendant trois jours ? Vais-je circoncire l’enfant et attendre trois jours ? Le Saint Béni soit-Il m’a pourtant ainsi ordonné : Va, retourne en Égypte. Pourquoi alors mériterait-il la mort ? Parce qu’il s’était occupé d’abord de son gîte à l’étape au lieu de procéder sans retard à la circoncision. Le Talmud, au Traité Nedarim (32a) dit que l’ange avait pris la forme d’un serpent, qu’il l’avalait en commençant par la tête jusqu’au hanches, puis le rejetait pour l’avaler à nouveau en commençant par les pieds jusqu’à l’endroit en question. C’est ainsi que Sippora a compris que c’était à cause de la circoncision. »

Rachi présente Moïse plongé dans les affres de la tergiversation. A quel commandement de Dieu faut-il obéir d’abord : celui de retourner en Égypte, ou celui de circoncire son fils ? Il tombe dans la faute lorsqu’à l’étape il ne s’occupe pas immédiatement de la circoncision. Mais le Traité Nedarim va plus loin. Il évoque Moïse avalé par un serpent. Le serpent commence par la tête et s’arrête aux hanches (au sexe), le recrache alors puis recommence en l’avalant par les pieds.

On peut conjecturer que ce « serpent » est une maladie. Moïse, incirconcis, a pu être victime d’une infection, qui se traduisait par de fortes fièvres, les douleurs s’étendant jusqu’au sexe. Puis, après une rémission, l’infection reprenait à partir des « pieds » (ou du sexe). L’espèce de fellation effectuée par le « serpent » est une métaphore assez crue, très biblique, somme toute. En tout cas, les talmudistes y ont pensé allusivement, et ont estimé que c’était ainsi que Sippora comprit ce qu’il lui restait à faire.

Mais si Moïse était victime d’une infection due à son incirconcision, pourquoi Sippora a-t-elle opéré le sexe de son fils plutôt que celui de Moïse ?

Nous butons, chaque fois que nous voulons faire entrer cette histoire dans le cadre d’une logique prophylactique ou médicale, sur certaines inconsistances.

De tout cela reste une image. Sippora touche le sexe de son mari avec le prépuce sanglant de son fils, et lui dit : « Tu es pour moi un époux de sang », lui sauvant ainsi la vie.

Pour les effrontés rationalistes, pour les incroyants irréductibles, il y a peut-être encore une autre interprétation : le sang du fils contenait de précieux anticorps, de précieux antibiotiques qui guérirent l’infection génitale de Moïse.

iEx. 4, 24-26