The God « Ka » (« Who? »)


« Raimundo Panikkar »

More than two millennia before the times of Melchisedechi and Abraham, other wandering and pious men were already singing the hymns of Ṛg Veda. Passing them on faithfully, generation after generation, they celebrated through hymns and prayers, the mysteries of a Supreme God, a Lord creator of worlds, of all creatures, of all lives.

Intelligence of the divine did just not begin in Ur in Chaldea, nor sacred wisdom in Salem.

They probably already reigned, more than five thousand years ago, among chosen, attentive, dedicated spirits. These men left as a legacy the hymns they sang, in precise and chiselled phrases, evoking the salient mysteries that constantly assailed them:

Of the Creator of all things, what can be said? What is his name?

What is the primary source of « Being »? How to name the primordial « Sun », from which the entire Cosmos emerged?

‘Who’ is the Lord imposing his lordship on all beings, – and on the ‘Being’ itself ? But who is ‘Who’?

What is the role of Man, what is his true part in this Mystery play?

A Vedic hymn, famous among all, summarizes and condenses all these difficult questions into one single one, both limpid and obscure.

It is Hymn X, 121 of Ṛg Veda, often titled « To the Unknown God ».

In the English translation by Ralph T.H. Griffith, this Hymn is entitled « Ka ».ii Ka, in Sanskrit, means « who ? »

This Hymn is dedicated to the God whom the Veda literally calls « Who? »

Griffith translates the exclamation recurring nine times throughout this ten-verses Hymn as follows :

« What God shall we adore with our oblation ? »

But from the point of view of Sanskrit grammar, it is perfectly possible to personify this interrogative pronoun, Ka, as the very name of the Unknown God.

Hence this possible translation :

To the God ‘Who?’

1. In the beginning appeared the Golden Germ.

As soon as he was born, he became the Lord of Being,

The support of Earth and this Heaven.

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

2. He, who gives life force and endurance,

He, whose commandments are laws for the Gods,

He, whose shadow is Immortal Life, – and Death.

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

3. ‘Who?iii – in His greatness appeared, the only sovereign

Of everything that lives, breathes and sleeps,

He, the Lord of Man and all four-membered creatures.

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

4. To Him belongs by right, by His own power,

The snow-covered mountains, the flows of the world and the sea.

His arms embrace the four quarters of the sky.

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

5. ‘Who?’ holds the Mighty Heavens and the Earth in safety,

He formed the light, and above it the vast vault of Heaven.

‘Who?’ measured the ether of the intermediate worlds.

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

6. Towards Him, trembling, forces crushed,

Subjected to his glory, raise their eyes.

Through Him, the sun of dawn projects its light.

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

7. When came the mighty waters, carrying

The Universal Germ from which Fire springs,

The One Spirit of God was born to be.

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

8. This Unit, which, in its power, watched over the Waters,

Pregnant with the life forces engendering the Sacrifice,

She is the God of Gods, and there is nothing on Her side.

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

9. O Father of the Earth, ruling by immutable laws,

O Heavenly Father, we ask You to keep us,

O Father of the ample and divine Waters!

What God shall we adore with our oblation ? 

10. O Lord of creaturesiv, Father of all things,

You alone penetrate all that is born,

This sacrifice that we offer you, we desire it,

Give it to us, and may we become lords of oblation!

_________

What is this divine Germ (Hiraṇyagarbha , or ‘Golden Germ’, in Sanskrit), mentioned in verses 1, 7 and 8?

One does not know, but one can sense it. The Divine is not the result of a creation, nor of an evolution, or of a becoming, as if it was not, – then was. The Veda here attempts a breakthrough in the very nature of the divinity, through the image of the ‘germ’, the image of pure life. The idea of a ‘God’ is only valid from the creature’s point of view. The idea of ‘God’ appears only through its relation to the idea of ‘creature’. For Himself, God is not ‘God’, – He must be, in His own eyes, something completely different, which has nothing to do with the pathos of creation and the creature.

One can make the same remark about « Being ». The « Being » appears only when the beings appear. God creates the beings and the Being at the same time. He Himself is beyond Being, since it is through Him that Being comes. And before the beings, before the Being itself, it seems that a divine, mysterious life ‘took place’. Not that it ‘was’, since the Being was not yet, but it ‘lived’, hidden, and then ‘was born’. But from what womb? From what prior, primordial uterus? We do not know. We only know that, in an abyssmal mystery (and not in time or space), an even deeper mystery, a sui generis mystery, grew, in this very depth, which was then to come to being, but without the Mystery itself being revealed by this growth and by this outcoming of being.

The place of origin of the mystery is not known, but the Veda calls it ‘Golden Germ’ (hiraṇyagarbha). This metaphor of a ‘Germ’ implies (logically?) some ovary, some womb, some desire, some life older than all life, and older than the Being itself.

Life came from this Living One, in Whom, by Whom and from Whom, it was given to the Being ; it was then given to be, and it was given thereby to beings, to all beings.

This mysterious process, which the word ‘Germ’ evokes, is also called ‘Sacrifice’, a word that appears in verse 8: Yajña (यज्ञ). The Seed dies to Himself, He sacrifices Himself, so that out of His own Life, life, all lives, may be born.

May God be born to Himself, through His sacrifice… What a strange thing!

By being born, God becomes ‘God’, He becomes the Lord of Being, for the Being, and the Lord of beings. Hymn 121 takes here its mystical flight, and celebrates a God who is the Father of creatures, and who is also always transcendent to the Being, to the world and to his own ‘divinity’ (inasmuch as this divinity allows itself to be seen in its Creation, and allows itself to be grasped in the Unity that it founds).

But who is this God who is so transcendent? Who is this God who hides, behind the appearance of the Origin, below or beyond the very Beginning?

There is no better noun, one might think, than this interrogative pronoun: ‘Who?’. Ka.

This ‘Who?’ , this Ka, does not call for an answer. Rather, it calls for another question, which Man addresses to himself: To whom? To whom must Man, seized by the unheard-of depth of the mystery, in turn offer his own sacrifice?

A haunting litany: « What God shall we adore with our oblation ? » 

It is not that the name of this God is strictly speaking unknown. Verse 10 uses the expression Prajāpati , ‘Lord of creatures’. It is found in other texts, for example in this passage from Taittirīya Saṁhitā :

« Indra, the latest addition to Prajāpati, was named ‘Lord of the Gods’ by his Father, but they did not accept him. Indra asked her Father to give her the splendor that is in the sun, so that she could be ‘Lord of the Gods’. Prajāpati answered her:

– If I give it to you, then who will I be?

– You will be what You say, who? (ka).

And since then, it was His name. »v

But these two names, Prajāpati , or Ka, refer only to something related to creatures, referring either to their Creator, or simply to their ignorance or perplexity.

These names say nothing about the essence of God. This essence is undoubtedly above all intelligibility, and above all essence.

This ka, ‘who?’, in the original Sanskrit text, is actually used in the singular dative form of the pronoun, kasmai (to whom?).

One cannot ask the question ‘who?’ with regard to God, but only ‘to whom? One cannot seek to question his essence, but only to distinguish him among all the other possible objects of worship.

God is mentally unknowable. Except perhaps in that we know that He is ‘sacrifice’. But we know nothing of the essence of His ‘sacrifice’. We can only ‘participate’ in the essence of this divine sacrifice (but not know it), more or less actively, — and this from a better understanding of the essence of our own sacrifice, of our ‘oblation’. Indeed, we are both subject and object of our oblation. In the same way, God is both subject and object of His sacrifice. We can then try to understand, by anagogy, the essence of His sacrifice through the essence of our oblation.

This is what Raimundo Panikkar describes as the ‘Vedic experience’. It is certainly not the personal experience of those Vedic priests and prophets who were chanting their hymns two thousand years before Abraham, but it could be at least a certain experience of the sacred, of which we ‘modern’ or ‘post-modern’ could still feel the breath and the burning.

____________________

iמַלְכֵּי-צֶדֶק , (malkî-ṣedeq) : ‘King of Salem’ and ‘Priest of the Most High (El-Elyôn)’.

iiRalph T.H. Griffith. The Hymns of the Rig Veda. Motilal Banarsidass Publihers. Delhi, 2004, p.628

iiiIn the original Sanskit: , Ka ? « To Whom ? »

iv Prajāpati :  » Lord of creatures « . This expression, so often quoted in the later texts of the Atharva Veda and Brāhmaṇa, is never used in the Ṛg Veda, except in this one place (RV X,121,10). It may therefore have been interpolated later. Or, – more likely in my opinion, it represents here, effectively and spontaneously, the first historically recorded appearance (in the oldest religious tradition in the world that has formally come down to us), or the ‘birth’ of the concept of ‘Lord of Creation’, ‘Lord of creatures’, – Prajāpati .

vTB II, 2, 10, 1-2 quoted by Raimundo Panikkar, The Vedic Experience. Mantramañjarī. Darton, Longman & Todd, London, 1977, p.69

La naissance du Dieu ‘Qui ?’


Plus de deux millénaires avant Melchisédechi et Abraham, des hommes errants et pieux chantaient déjà les hymnes du Ṛg Veda. Les transmettant fidèlement, génération après génération, ils célébraient, non dans le sang, mais par le chant, les mystères d’un Dieu Suprême, un Seigneur créateur des mondes, de toutes les créatures, de toutes les vies.

L’intelligence n’a pas commencé à Ur en Chaldée, ni la sagesse à Salem.

Elles régnaient déjà sans doute, il y a plus de cinq mille ans, parmi des esprits choisis, attentifs, dédiés. Ces hommes ont laissé en héritage les hymnes qu’ils psalmodiaient, en phrases sonores et ciselées, évoquant les mystères saillants, qui les assaillaient sans cesse :

Du Créateur de toutes choses, que peut-on dire ? Quel est seulement son nom?

Quelle est la source première de l’ « Être » ? Comment nommer le soleil primordial, d’où le Cosmos tout entier émergea ?

‘Qui ?’ est le Seigneur imposant sa seigneurie à tous les êtres, – et à l’« Être » même. Mais qui est ‘Qui ?’ ?

Quel est le rôle de l’Homme, quelle est sa véritable part dans le Mystère ?

Toutes ces difficiles questions, un hymne védique, fameux entre tous, les résume et les condense en une seule d’entre elles, à la fois limpide et obscure :

« À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice? »

On a souvent donné pour titre à l’Hymne X, 121 du Ṛg Veda, cette dédicace: « Au Dieu inconnu ».

Il vaudrait mieux, me semble-t-il, la dédier plus littéralement au Dieu que le Véda appelle ‘Qui ?’.

Au Dieu ‘Qui ?ii

1. Au commencement parut le Germe d’or.

Aussitôt né, il devint le Seigneur de l’Être,

Le soutien de la Terre et de ce Ciel.

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

2. Lui, qui donne force de vie et dure vigueur,

Lui, dont les commandements sont des lois pour les Dieux,

Lui, dont l’ombre est Vie immortelle, – et Mort.

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

3. ‘Qui ?iii – dans Sa grandeur est apparu, seul souverain

De tout ce qui vit, de tout ce qui respire et dort,

Lui, le Seigneur de l’Homme et de toutes les créatures à quatre membres.

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

4. À Lui, appartient de droit, par Sa propre puissance,

Les monts enneigés, les flux du monde et la mer.

Ses bras embrassent les quatre quartiers du ciel.

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

5. ‘Qui ?’ tient en sûreté les Cieux puissants et la Terre,

Il a formé la lumière, et au-dessus la vaste voûte du Ciel.

Qui ?’ a mesuré l’éther des mondes intermédiaires.

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

6. Vers Lui, tremblantes, les forces écrasées,

Soumises à sa gloire, lèvent leurs regards.

Par Lui, le soleil de l’aube projette sa lumière.

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

7. Quand vinrent les Eaux puissantes, charriant

Le Germe universel d’où jaillit le Feu,

L’Esprit Unique du Dieu naquit à l’être.

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

8. Cette Unité, qui, dans sa puissance, veillait sur les Eaux,

Enceinte des forces de vie engendrant le Sacrifice,

Elle est le Dieu des Dieux, et il n’y a rien à Son côté.

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

9. Ô Père de la Terre, gouvernant par des lois immuables,

Ô Père des Cieux, nous Te prions de nous garder,

Ô Père des amples et divines Eaux!

À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice?

10. Ô Seigneur des créaturesiv, Père de toutes choses,

Toi seul pénètres tout ce qui vient à naître,

Ce sacrifice que nous t’offrons, nous le désirons,

Donne-le nous, et puissions-nous devenir seigneurs de l’oblation!

Quel est ce Germe divin, cité aux vers 1, 7 et 8 ? On ne sait, mais on le pressent. Le Divin n’est pas le résultat d’une création, ni d’une évolution, ou d’un devenir, comme s’il n’était pas, – puis était. Le Véda tente ici une percée dans la nature même de la divinité, à travers l’image du ‘germe’, image de vie pure. L’idée d’un ‘Dieu’ ne vaut en effet que par rapport au point de vue de la créature. L’idée de ‘Dieu’ ne paraît que par sa relation à l’idée de ‘créature’. Pour Lui-même, Dieu n’est pas ‘Dieu’, – Il est à Ses yeux tout autre chose, qui n’a rien à voir avec le pathos de la création et de la créature.

Il en est de même de l’être. L’être ne paraît que lorsque paraissent les êtres. Dieu crée les êtres et l’Être en même temps. Lui-même est au-delà de l’Être, puisque c’est par Lui que l’Être advient. Et avant les êtres, avant l’Être même, il semble bien qu’une vie divine, mystérieuse ‘avait lieu’. Non qu’elle ‘fût’, puisque l’être n’était pas encore, mais elle ‘vivait’, cachée, pour arriver ensuite à ‘naître’. Mais de quelle matrice ? De quel utérus préalable, primordial ? On ne sait. On sait seulement que, dans le mystère (et non dans le temps, ni dans l’espace), croissait, mais dans sa profondeur même, un mystère plus profond encore, un mystère sui generis, qui devait advenir à l’être, sans pour autant que le Mystère Lui-même ne se révèle par là.

Le lieu de la provenance du mystère n’est pas connu, mais le Véda l’appelle ‘Germe d’Or’ (hiraṇyagarbha). Ce ‘Germe’ suppose quelque ovaire, quelque matrice, quelque désir, quelque vie plus ancienne que toute vie, et plus ancienne que l’Être même.

La Vie vint de ce Vivant, en Qui, par Qui et de Qui, elle fut donnée à l’Être, elle fut donnée à être, et elle fut donnée par là aux êtres, à tous les êtres.

Ce processus mystérieux, que le mot ’Germe’ évoque, est aussi appelé ‘Sacrifice’, mot qui apparaît au vers 8 : Yajña ( यज्ञ). Le Germe meurt à Lui-même, Il se sacrifie, pour que de Sa propre Vie, naisse la vie, toutes les vies.

Que Dieu naisse à Lui-même, de par Son sacrifice… Quelle étrange chose !

En naissant, Dieu devient ‘Dieu’, Il devient pour l’Être le Seigneur de l’Être, et le Seigneur des êtres. L’hymne 121 prend son envol mystique, et célèbre un Dieu Père des créatures, et aussi toujours transcendant à l’Être, au monde et à sa propre ‘divinité’ (en tant que celle-ci se laisse voir dans sa Création, et se laisse saisir dans l’Unité qu’elle fonde).

Mais qui est donc ce Dieu si transcendant ? Qui est ce Dieu qui se cache, derrière l’apparence de l’Origine, en-deça ou au-delà du Commencement même ?

Il n’y pas de meilleur nom, peut-on penser, que ce pronom, interrogatif : ‘Qui ?’

Ce ‘Qui ?’ n’appelle pas de réponse. Il appelle plutôt une autre question, que l’Homme s’adresse à lui-même : À Qui ? À Qui l’Homme, saisi par la profondeur inouïe du mystère, doit-il, à son tour, offrir son propre sacrifice ?

Lancinante litanie : « À quel Dieu offrirons-nous notre sacrifice? »

Ce n’est pas que le nom de ce Dieu soit à proprement parler inconnu. Le vers 10 emploie l’expression Prajāpati , ‘Seigneur des créatures’. On la retrouve dans d’autres textes, par exemple dans ce passage de la Taittirīya Sahitā :

« Indra, le dernier-né de Prajāpati, fut nommé ‘Seigneur des Dieux’ par son Père, mais ceux-ci ne l’acceptèrent pas. Indra demanda à son Père de lui donner la splendeur qui est dans le soleil, de façon à pouvoir être ‘Seigneur des Dieux’. Prajāpati lui répondit :

– Si je te la donne, alors qui serai-je ?

– Tu seras ce que Tu dis, qui ? (ka).

Et depuis lors, ce fut Son nom. »v

Mais ces deux noms, Prajāpati , ou Ka, ne désignent que quelque chose de relatif aux créatures, se référant soit à leur Créateur, soit simplement à leur ignorance ou leur perplexité.

Ces noms ne disent rien de l’essence même du Dieu. Cette essence est sans doute au-dessus de tout intelligible, et de toute essence.

Ce ka, ‘qui ?’, dans le texte sanskrit original, est en réalité employé dans la forme du datif singulier du pronom, kasmai (à qui?).

On ne peut pas poser la question ‘qui ?’ à l’égard du Dieu, mais seulement ‘à qui ?’. On ne peut chercher à interroger son essence, mais seulement chercher à le distinguer parmi tous les autres objets possibles d’adoration.

Le Dieu est mentalement inconnaissable. Sauf peut-être en cela que nous savons qu’Il est ‘sacrifice’. Mais nous ne savons rien de l’essence de Son ‘sacrifice’. Nous pouvons seulement ‘participer’ à l’essence de ce sacrifice divin (mais non la connaître), plus ou moins activement, — et cela à partir d’une meilleure compréhension de l’essence de notre propre sacrifice, de notre ‘oblation’ . En effet, nous sommes à la fois sujet et objet de notre oblation. De même, le Dieu est sujet et objet de Son sacrifice. Nous pouvons alors tenter de comprendre, par anagogie, l’essence de Son sacrifice par l’essence notre oblation.

C’est cela que Raimundo Panikkar qualifie d’ ‘expérience védique’. Il ne s’agit certes pas de l’expérience personnelle de ces prêtres et de ces prophètes védiques qui psalmodiaient leurs hymnes, deux mille ans avant Abraham, mais il pourrait s’agir du moins d’une certaine expérience du sacré, – dont nous pourrions encore, nous ‘modernes’, ou ‘post-modernes’, sentir encore le souffle, et la brûlure.

iמַלְכֵּי־צֶדֶק , (malkî-ṣedeq) : ‘Roi de Salem’ et ‘Prêtre du Très-Haut (El-Elyôn)

iiṚg Veda X, 121. Trad. Philippe Quéau

iii En sanskit :  Ka

ivPrajāpati : « Seigneur des créatures ». Cette expression, si souvent citée dans les textes plus tardifs de l’Atharva Veda et des Brāhmaṇa, n’est jamais utilisée dans le Ṛg Veda, excepté à cet unique endroit (RV X,121,10). Il a donc peut-être été interpolé plus tardivement. Ou bien, – plus vraisemblablement à mon sens, il représente ici, effectivement, et spontanément, la première apparition historiquement consignée (dans la plus ancienne tradition religieuse du monde qui soit formellement parvenue jusqu’à nous), ou la ‘naissance’ du concept de ‘Seigneur de la Création’, de ‘Seigneur des créatures’,– Prajāpati .

vTB II, 2, 10, 1-2 cité par Raimundo Panikkar, The Vedic Experience. Mantramañjarī. Darton, Longman & Todd, London, 1977, p.69